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Cibb

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I'm interested in trying a red kit wine. What kits would you recommend a beginner to start with.

I recently developed a taste for medium to full body red wines. I like pinot noir, and among the estimate I've had was a hickory creek winery cab franc wine.

I'd like to do a gewurztraminer also for the wife at some point.

Sorry if this is the wrong forum just trying to figure out where to get started.
 

Cibb

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Thanks. Can't wait to get some wine but I know it takes a while.

I looked at their prices and they are very good.

Any information on the fast fermenter?

Also any recommendations on the wine kits? Which ate good for starting out?
 
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bkisel

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Welcome to the forum!

Any 10L or larger kit from Winexpert or RJ Spagnols that tickles your fancy would be a good choice.

IMHO, stay with the standard primary bucket until you've got a half dozen or so batches of wine under your belt before experimenting with other less commonly used equipment.
 

Cibb

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Welcome to the forum!

Any 10L or larger kit from Winexpert or RJ Spagnols that tickles your fancy would be a good choice.

IMHO, stay with the standard primary bucket until you've got a half dozen or so batches of wine under your belt before experimenting with other less commonly used equipment.
I'm shooting for the bigger kits anyway as I drink a lot of wine.

Thanks for the recommendation about the fermenter.
 

StBlGT

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For a first time kit, i wouldn't do the larger 18L w/skins ones. Start with maybe a cru select merlot or pinot noir at best. Something that is easy for the first time....then work up to skins kits. The select will still make a nice wine since it is 16L.

Also, when the above poster said a 10L kit, it isn't going to just make 10L. You add water to the kit to get to the 6 gallon mark.
 

richmke

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Mid range kit for a first-timer (something in the 12L range). The wine is decent, but if you mess up, you limited your loss.

Regarding the fast fermentor - spend your money on the All-in-one wine pump first. Much more useful than the fast fermentor.

When you make the sweeter wines (those with an f-pack), add only 1/2 the f-pack, and refrigerate the rest. After a week, sample the wine. Adjust sweetness accordingly. 1/2 f-pack is sometimes too sweet for me.

Try this one as your first kit:
http://labelpeelers.com/wine-making/wine-kits/selection-international/selection-chilean-pinot-noir-16l-wine-kit/

If you can pick one up locally, this would be another good starter kit (takes you through all the steps):
http://labelpeelers.com/wine-making/wine-kits/world-vineyard-1-gallon-kits/world-vineyard-pinot-noir-1-gallon-wine-kit/
 
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Putterrr

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If you can follow instructions on a cheaper kit, then you can follow them on the premium kits. Purchase the best kit you can afford as you get what you pay for. The premium kits need to age a bit longer (12-24 months) to get the full benifit of the extra cost. That said all kits benifit from aging so take your time. White kits are more forgiving for early drinking than reds. Usually it it advised to make kits by the book at first and then you can decide if you want to make changes as you gain experience.

enjoy the ride

cheers
 

GaDawg

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I'm interested in trying a red kit wine. What kits would you recommend a beginner to start



I'd like to do a gewurztraminer also for the wife at some point.

I would do a 10L gewurzts 1st. Then follow up with a Pinot Noir. White wine will be drinkable sooner. You can enjoy your wine while you are aging your Pinot. I alternate quick drinkers and wine to age until I have an adequate wine cellar. I personally would not want to make a full bodied big bold red and then sit and look at it for a year waiting on it to age so I can drink it!

And you will make your wife happy! Happy wife happy life!
 

Spikedlemon

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When I started: I loved Pinot Noir and Beaujolais wines. Both light-body reds.

I made a batch of Pinot Noir and "Bergamais" (Beaujolais) from the Winexpert 10L series (World Vinyard and Vintners Reserve). Both are easy-drinking wines that I do not regret - the Bergamais was actually entirely an impulse-buy. I made a Pinot Gris kit for the missus as well that she loved.
FYI: Cab Franc is still a light/medium body red.

I'll agree with comments above with the logic that if you can follow directions on a basic kit: you can follow the instructions on a higher-end kit. The world of wine is your oyster.

If I were you: I'd start with the white for the wife (per @GaDawg) and follow up with whatever strikes your fancy. Keep in mind that you can get ANYTHING and use the time making your wife's wine to go out and taste-around.
 

Mismost

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When I started I started with the cheaper kits....just because I was cheap, and I've had a lot of fun doing them too. Couple of years down the road and now I am wishing I had started with the bigger better kits. Those could now be a couple of years old and be really nice wines after the aging time.

Then again, there's my way....do some cheaper kits (read the Tweaking Kits thread) and build up a stash. NOW I'm starting with the big boy kits!

AND I've started thinking ahead a little bit and I think I'm going to start a big kit, then a cheap tweaked kit, then big...repeat. So, I will have some early drinking wines, some getting aged, and some aged ready to drink....in a few years maybe I'll be at that point.

We have found that the Mezza Luna Red is a decent early drinking red wine from a cheap kit. Might be a good one to start and learn on....but, this ain't rocket science..it's just fun stuff.
 

bkisel

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I will often use the nearly spent grape skins from a higher end kit to tweak a lower end kit. It might very well be all in my mind but it does seem to enhance the lower end kit.
 

bandit33

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I started with some of the fun, cheaper kits like Cheeky Monkey and Glad Hatter. They are quicker kits and helped me gain some confidence. They are also considered "early drinkers" so they helped fill my wine supply while I let the more expensive kits bulk age. One of our favorite whites is the Atmosphere Muller Thurgau, we were plannning to do a Gewurztriminer but it was suggested, instead! Happy wine making!!...:)
 

Mismost

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I will often use the nearly spent grape skins from a higher end kit to tweak a lower end kit. It might very well be all in my mind but it does seem to enhance the lower end kit.
I did this to a batch of Jam and Jelly wine with my Bravado skins...too early to tell if it helped or if anything could help this batch....it may be my first "dumper batch"!

But, I have the Eclipse Old Vine Zin working right now. Debating on saving that bag of skins or doing the extended machination and leaving the skins in the bucket. Some times I love the ideas we get off this forum....sometimes, not so much!
 

bkisel

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I did this to a batch of Jam and Jelly wine with my Bravado skins...too early to tell if it helped or if anything could help this batch....it may be my first "dumper batch"!

But, I have the Eclipse Old Vine Zin working right now. Debating on saving that bag of skins or doing the extended machination and leaving the skins in the bucket. Some times I love the ideas we get off this forum....sometimes, not so much!
Yeah, I never heard of "extended machination" until just a week or two ago while browsing the forum. Sounds very interesting and promising but would I, so to speak, want to let go of the bird in the hand for the two in the bush?
 

tjgaul

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My recommendation for a Gewurztraminer would be the RJS Grand Cru. It's an entry level kit that's simple to make and tastes great early. No F-Pac involved, however I find that just a little bit of back sweetening really brings out both the flavor and aroma. I've made the Grand Cru and the Select (next level up) and everyone has agreed that the cheaper kit is just as good, if not better. I just finished my 2nd kit of the Grand Cru and it's really good as soon as it clears. Just my 2 cents.

Whatever your choice - good luck.
Tim
 

Mismost

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LOL. That was a copy and paste btw. You sure it was posted tongue in cheek?
I actually looked that one up...said plot or scheme...so it does fit, sorta! sometimes I am good...most of the time just lucky!
 

Spikedlemon

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I started with some of the fun, cheaper kits like Cheeky Monkey and Glad Hatter. They are quicker kits and helped me gain some confidence. They are also considered "early drinkers" so they helped fill my wine supply while I let the more expensive kits bulk age.
That is a very good point.

I don't regret starting with the 10L juice kits to build up a foundation. They were all pretty drinkable from day 1 and have only gotten better.
Drink those while you wait on the more expensive kits.
 

Cibb

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Another question. I'd ask is are the more expensive kts worth it?
 
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