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WineMaker

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Hi, my name is Michael. I have been drinking wine for a little over 5 years. Right now, my favorite is Syrah. I do prefer the red wines over the white wines. As for the sweet wines, I do love Moscato.

I have just recently started researching on how to make my own wine, but have not made any, as of yet. I'm actually looking into purchasing a starter kit in the near future. I'm thinking about making either an apple or strawberry wine as my first one.

I look forward to getting advice from other members here. From what I have seen so far, this forum is really helpful.

Sincerely,

Michael
 

Tom

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Welcome,
Are you saying you want to make your 1st wine from fresh fruit? I dont know of any kits that can make apple or strawberry.
My suggestion is start with a wine kit. Keep in mind that the price of the kit is the quality of wine you will get.
Why not start with a Syrah kit for your 1st. after a few kits you will better understand the "process" in winemaking. Then go for the fresh fruit / juice wines.
 

TheTooth

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Hi Michael,

I second Tom's suggestion. I have been making beer/mead/cider for a few years now, but I just started making wine. I'm still making kits and starting to look into branching out into fresh grape/juice and/or fruit wines, but I learned a lot about the process with kits without having to worry about PH levels, acid levels, nutrients, what types of acids are in what fruits, pectins, etc... The kits stabilize the juice so all you need to worry about is following the directions and getting comfortable with the process.

Have you ever made beer, mead, cider, or another fermented beverage of some sort?
 

WineMaker

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I'm sorry... Yes, I am going to start with a kit. I'm not going to start with the fresh fruit. Like both of you have said, I basically have to get my feet wet from the beginning and learn the whole process with the kit (that's what I intend to do).

No, I have never made any beer, cider or mead before. This is a whole new project/hobby for me for 2010.

Michael
 

TheTooth

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I'm sorry... Yes, I am going to start with a kit. I'm not going to start with the fresh fruit. Like both of you have said, I basically have to get my feet wet from the beginning and learn the whole process with the kit (that's what I intend to do).

No, I have never made any beer, cider or mead before. This is a whole new project/hobby for me for 2010.

Michael
Cool... Welcome to the hobby!
 

Runningwolf

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Michael welcome aboard. I agree with Tom about starting out with a kit. I am not so sure I agree with calling wine making a hobby. Start buying a surplus of carboys. It's an obsession! :b
 

Tom

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OBSESSION??
DID I HEAR
OBSESSION???? :a1


Just look below. And to think I am "low"
 

Dufresne11

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Agreed

A friend started me out slow but this is like an addiction. I am completely obesseed with wine making. I check this site at least once an hour to see if there are things being talked about that I need to know about.

It seems like a great pastime.... enjoy this site it has given me quite a bit more than I have put into it:fsh
 

Wade E

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My recommendation to you is spend a little more then bare bones on the equipment kit. Get a floor corker and a drill mounted Fizz X Degasser, not the plastic wine whip. I would also get an auto siphon. Here is a great place to get your supplies and kits. When buying kits I will usually tell you that with red wines that are supposed to be big and chewy like a Ca or a Syrah to get the bigger grape skin kits, they are a little more work and need more aging but will make what you are looking or. If yo like a wine more like a Pinot Noir that is a thinner more table like wine then the smaller kits will do OK but the bigger ones will still beat them. The only advantage to the smaller kits is that they are earlier drinkers but dont believe what they read about being good at bottling time.
here is the link to buy stuff online. there are many other places also but this is where I do lots of my business. http://finevinewines.com/
 

WineMaker

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LOL!! I guess I have found a new obsession!! :)

Thanks for the information Wade E.. I will definately have to look into those pieces of equipment and the website.

Michael
 

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