Degassing in a carboy....

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Rice_Guy

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We're done? I haven't even chimed in, man I missed the whole thing.
The web is BAD when the wife gets home tonight she is going to ask what did I do today? Well honey was on the web, didn’t do anything.

If you can"t have fun - Then I guess it is time for a Glass of Wine - or maybe more - LOL

Ought to get out of pajamas and do something useful . . . Could tell her I was playing with heating pex on the gas stove, , , not smart to say that. Steve did you want me to put a vacuum corking tool together for you?
 
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Scooter68

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I find it hard to believe that a properly aged wine will retain any appreciable CO2 after 12 months or more in a carboy with an airlock.

So I have never found any 'bite' or evidence of gas in my wines at bottling time - even after 9 months of aging on a few.
 

Rice_Guy

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I find it hard to believe that a properly aged wine will retain any appreciable CO2 after 12 months or more in a carboy with an airlock.

So I have never found any 'bite' or evidence of gas in my wines at bottling time - even after 9 months of aging on a few.
SYNERGISTIC EFFECT
I have found that if I age 9 months or a year at basement temp I have starved the yeast and can skip sorbate.
 
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SYNERGISTIC EFFECT
I have found that if I age 9 months or a year at basement temp I have starved the yeast and can skip sorbate.

I would not trust this effect, myself and wouldn't consider it best practices to encourage others to follow. Short of pushing the alcohol up very high, only sure ways to be certain of no further fermentation in a sweet wine are 1) Sterile filtration 0.45 micron absolute or tighter and 2) add potassium sorbate to act as birth control for the yeast and prevent further budding and risk of refermentation.
 

joecopp

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Been at this for 3 years now with 25 or so kits and fruit wines under my belt. The Vacuvin (I'm on my second one) is a pain in the butt to use for degassing 6 gallon carboys but it does get the job done.
Wow, that's a lot of wine you're making there. Wish I was a neighbor in good standing
 

Rice_Guy

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I would not trust this effect, myself and wouldn't consider it best practices to encourage others to follow. Short of pushing the alcohol up very high, only sure ways to be certain of no further fermentation in a sweet wine are 1) Sterile filtration 0.45 micron absolute or tighter and 2) add potassium sorbate to act as birth control for the yeast and prevent further budding and risk of refermentation.
Yeast is easier to kill than some potential bacterial contaminants. Basically wine is a multi variable preservative system. Wine is a complicated food product since combining two or three variables will change how lethal adding a third or fourth factor is. Decreasing a variable as targeting 8% alcohol will make the system less lethal on all other preservative factors, or storing the wine at 40 to. 45F (or a garage in winter) will lengthen the time needed to kill yeast.
I will assume most folks here do not read the Journal of Viticulture and Enology so you probably correct about best practices. From a practical point it probably is worth while to be aware how to kill yeast since some combinations will unintentionally produce a stuck fermentation.
A few ways to kill yeast
3- Pasteurize as at 120F for one hour or 140F for ten minutes or 250F for ten seconds (or 98 for a week or so)
4- Use a yeast which does not tolerate high alcohol ex an ale yeast
5- eliminate nutrients as nitrogen
6- cold shock, one of the speakers at winemaker mag conference suggested a one hour/ quick 10 C temperature drop from 80F (optimum growth temp), to 45 or 50F
7- high CO2 (basically changes pH)
8- reducing the pH
9- SO2 shock
10- increased osmotic pressure usually with sugar but salts do this too (and alcohol as you noted)
11- high pressure as 2000 psig for one minute
Each of the processing treatments will require some care as filtering at 0.45 micron and then contamination afterwards with hoses or in a poorly sanitized bottle filler/ bottling tank still produces a risk, or using sorbate which has been exposed to humidity will degrade a portion of the chemical. , , , ie all methods will have some risk, , , some we have yet to learn about ex when I was a kid food processors didn’t really worry about listeria and public health worry about misting systems containing legionnaires disease.
 

winemanden

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It's all matter of taste and time. Take it easy, build up your stock, then you can take the time to sit and enjoy a glass of what no one else in the world has made.
⚠ Gas? What gas?

PS. There's a shortage of CO2 in the UK. Send some over. :D
 

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