Big bug

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Larryh86GT

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I was picking my raspberries this morning and spotted this large beetle on one of the brambles. It is about 1 1/4" long by 3/4" wide. It's a big bug. Anyone recognize it? I left it alone and hope it doesn't eat much. We are having our 4th wettest June since they began keeping records 140 years ago. There are a lot of bugs this year.

Larry

Bug 1  6 29 10.jpg

Bug 3  6 29 10.jpg

Bug 2   6 29 10.jpg
 

pwrose

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It looks alot like a June Bug, except for the size is way off, a June bug is smaller, about the size of a Japanese Beetle. I will get back to you on this, I am pretty sure I can find out it just might take a day or so to get a response from my bug expert.
 

Larryh86GT

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I think you have identified it:

The grapevine beetle, Pelidnota punctata, also known as Spotted June Beetle or the Spotted Pelidnota, is a member of the subfamily Rutelinae of the Scarab beetle family. Grapevine beetles are common in the north and central United States and Eastern Canada, but do relatively little damage to their host plants.
The adult beetle is approximately 2.5 cm (1 inch) long, but can reach 1.2 inches occasionally, off-yellow, with three spots running down each side. Fine black lines divide the edges of its elytra. At other times, the beetle may have been known as Pelidnota lutea. There are two different variations of pelidnota punctata, the southern variation lacks the darker legs, while the northern variation has darker legs.
Habitat and Diet
The beetle lives in the eastern coast of North America, as well as Florida, Nebraska and north western Missouri, and has been found in central Indiana. It lives, like many beetles, in forests, and is mostly seen during the summer, active flyers these beetles are commonly attracted to lights at night. It is also seen in vineyards and gardens.
The adult beetle eats the leaves and fruit of grapevines, both wild and cultivated, although it is not normally a major pest of vineyards.
Beetle eggs are laid in rotten wood or tree stumps, where they hatch into larvae. Larvae feed on the rotting wood and pupate to become adults from April to September[1].
Adult chafers eat the leaves and flowers of many deciduous trees, shrubs and other plants, but rarely cause any serious damage. However, their fat, white grubs (reaching 40-45 mm long when full grown) live in the soil and feed on plant roots, especially those of grasses and cereals, and are occasional pests in pastures, nurseries, gardens, and in grassy amenity areas like golf-courses. The injury to grassland and lawns results in poorly growing patches that quickly turn brown in dry weather; the grubs can be found immediately below the surface, usually lying in a characteristic comma-like position. The grubs sometimes attack vegetables and other garden plants, e.g. lettuce, raspberry, strawberry and young ornamental trees. Injury to the roots and rootstock causes small saplings and tender tap-rooted plants like lettuce, to wilt suddenly or to show stunted growth and a tendency to shed leaves prematurely. Plants growing in rows are usually attacked in succession as the grubs move along from one plant to the next. Chafer grubs feed below ground for 3-4 years before changing into adult beetles.

It looks the grubs are a bigger problem than the adult. I may have to relocate this one.
 
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Wade E

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Looks very similiar to a Jap. beetle except for the size huh? Thats a big beetle!!!!!!!
 

Larryh86GT

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I found another grapevine beetle this morning. And this one was chewing on my grapevines. As I took this picture a Japanese beetle flew across my field of view on the camera :pic coming in for a snack. Lots of bugs this year.

Grapevine beetle  7 4 10.jpg
 

Racer

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Over the last 3 seasons I've had a few of those guys on my vines. They can get pretty sneaky too. I have even seen them pull the leaf around themselves to hid better.
 
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