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Johnd

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As someone who has lived around that architecture for the last 33 years let me just say this. While it is unique, different, and seen quite frequently here in the Southwest especially NM it is one of the worst roofs to maintain. You will be doing good to get 10 years out of a flat roof before it needs repair/replacement. You have no attic either so if you decide you want to add something to the ceiling like a fan or another light fixture your hosed. You want to run another cable drop for TV or internet, your not going in the attic for that either. I have seen people actually put a pitched roof on a flat roof many times but I have never seen anyone get rid of a pitched roof and go with a flat roof on a home remodel. Water/snow will stand on them even if they put a small pitch on it. The new membrane material they are using is better than the old tar and gravel method but still they are a royal PITA to maintain.

Caveat Emptor!

Stucco exterior is definitely the way to go in this part of the country for sure!

Funny, first thing I thought when I saw it was, “where’s the roof?”, second thought was “oh, it’s a DD drawing with no roof yet”, third thought, when I realized it was flat roof with parapets and internal / thru-wall drainage, was pity for the contractor who builds and warrants it for a year, then the owner who has to maintain it. I’m with Mike, roof it!!
 

ibglowin

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I would look at a Pro-Panel (metal) roof of sorts. Quite popular these days in the SW. Many colors to pick from including a new really cool looking IMHO faux-copper color. Lifetime warranty and (pretty much) hail proof which is important as there is no such thing as a gentle summer rain in the desert southwest. Every time it rains it usually hails for some portion of it. You never know if its gonna stay at tiny pea sized or go to all out assault aka golf ball sized at any given moment.
 

jswordy

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Congratulations, Mike! House design looks good, I thought it was way more that ~ 2,300 SF. Nice and casual and open! I like the informal eating arrangement, which allows what otherwise would have been an occasional space for dining to be used as living area. The large living room area would provide plenty of space for tables, etc., if you ever wanted to entertain big at a catered affair, etc.

Most if all, LOTS OF WINDOWS! I like that a lot! Have you looked into the ones with the automatic shades inside? They also make auto tint windows that are pretty awesome. Don't want ay more of that radiant heat inside than necessary! I remember a friend in Phoenix said couches are placed about 18" inside the room from the walls because of the heat penetration in many homes.

Looking at the plat, and oooooh it would be so tempting to buy the neighbor's lot and just leave it be.

Again, congrats, and remember...
3778025697_80667fc362.jpg
 

jswordy

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I would look at a Pro-Panel (metal) roof of sorts. Quite popular these days in the SW. Many colors to pick from including a new really cool looking IMHO faux-copper color. Lifetime warranty and (pretty much) hail proof which is important as there is no such thing as a gentle summer rain in the desert southwest. Every time it rains it usually hails for some portion of it. You never know if its gonna stay at tiny pea sized or go to all out assault aka golf ball sized at any given moment.

Metal roof is the way to go, whether standing seam or other. Around here in the SE, you can even get them with 50-year warranties now. They have them that look like adobe tiles, shingles, shakes - you name it! Also, be sure to get the reflective coating, if you get it coated. That's a special paint designed to reflect heat better. (Used to be a federal tax credit for using that, but I think it is gone now.)

Under the roofing, I would install a layer of aluminum-faced double bubble insulation directly on the decking, topped with 1x4 purlins and then the metal to provide a 1" air gap between the metal and the insulation. Ideally, you want aluminum on both faces, but sometimes all you can get is white on one side. In that case, put the white side down.

This is a subject I know well, having speced it on my house. I use it in conjunction with the standard fiberglass insulation in my attic. In summer, the system reflects radiant heat off the foil and into the 1" air space, where it is conducted to a continuous roof vent. In winter, the 1" gap provides added insulation against heat loss. It also minimizes condesation on the underside of the metal roofing, which often happens when it is directly attached to a roof deck.

My house was the first such insulated roof the roofers had ever installed and it made a huge difference in cooling costs and a more modest difference in heating costs. The cooling is what counts in hot climes. I think this added ~ $400 in material costs to my roof, plus the labor to staple it down and tape the seams with silver tape. It paid for itself in one summer's savings.

Regarding exposed conduits and ductwork, etc., please remember that every exposed surface will catch dust and draw cobwebs eventually! I have friends who built cathedral ceiling exposed beam houses with exposed ducts, and they created a real cleaning chore. Just my .02.
 

Kraffty

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Thanks all for taking the time regarding the roof. I'm also a little wary about the life and maintenance of a "flat" roof design. I was actually planning on a 3/12 pitch, behind the parapets, peaked in the center over the main area and sloped outward over the bedroom wings, just couldn't figure out how to make it happen with the software. I hadn't considered the metal roof idea other than possibly over the patio, will definitely add that option to the list when talking with the architect. The bottom line is that I want it to last at least one day longer than I do. There's so much to consider, I'll take all the imput, advice and suggestions I can get.
Mike
 

balatonwine

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Metal roof is the way to go

We had to re-roof. 80 year of old clay tile roof was at its life span limits. I wanted to put on a metal roof. But the local building codes (Historical regulations) would not let me. :(

We went with tile again. But a modern tile design. About 1/2 the tiles and 1/2 the weight. Which was good since the we could move that weight inside when renovating the interior as we are turning an uninsulated attic into an insulated space.
 
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balatonwine

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Just remember all this advice and $1 will buy you a coke (if your lucky) from a vending machine! LOL

I agree 100%. One really should trust the knowledge and experience of their local architect (okay to rough out an idea yourself, but hire a pro to do the final plan). With of course copious question and requests for information about such things as roof type longevity in their region (i.e. I doubt there will be much snow at this site, so comments about snow on a flat roof at this site may be a non-sequitur).
 
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Kraffty

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Time to start spending some actual money and get the ball rolling. We drove up Friday (445 miles) for a couple of appointments with architectural drafts-men / people / persons. Quoted 4 companies, interviewed 2 and hired one based on his career history. He worked as a city plan checker for new residential construction for about 10 years leading up to the crash in 08. After being laid off he drafted for local contractors and after about 6 years went out on his own. His office is in Prescott Valley (about 40 miles away) but he regularly runs permits through the cottonwood city building division because of his connections, experience with their processes and relationships with the staff, including the inspectors. I just can't see how that couldn't help make the entire process easier and smoother right from the beginning. While his prices were about 10% higher than the other company we interviewed, his services included scheduling the Engineering company for the soils testing. Meeting with the Engineers on site for layout of the house and with the excavation company for the site prep. I'm hoping he is as valuable a resource as I believe he will be to the project. We ended the day by meeting up with two very old friends for dinner. We'd only seen them once in the last 4 years because the made a similar move, but to the Prescott area, about 5 years ago.

Saturday we did an amateur job of staking out the "house" in position on the lot and found it needed to be adjusted about 25 feet south and rotated about 15 degrees counterclockwise to better fit the topography and to give us the very best view off the back deck and out the living room windows. We spent a couple of hours visiting with the neighbors across the street and met another neighbor who is a general contractor. Between the two I've already gained a couple of experienced local resources and was able to ask questions about what to expect over the next few months. I also learned that Jim, the guy across the street, who owns an excavation company and grows grapes and makes wine......... plays golf too! I love this village already!

Sunday morning we headed home very early, it's a little over 6 hours at about 80mph most of the way. At the suggestion of our dinner companions Friday night we stopped to take a picture from the center of our deck at sunrise. I'm starting to feel like a "short-timer" here in the office. We're due to sign another year lease in a couple of months and very seriously considering not doing that. Lori could work from home and I could spend more time prepping our house for sale in the spring and working on the new house. We'll know better by the end of the month. Lot's to get done and the sooner, and more we do early, the easier it'll be next spring.

Next up, building plans get done - maybe 6 to 8 weeks, start clearing the site of some of the plants and rocks for the footprint of the house and maybe grading a temporary driveway path so we can drive down to the building area easier. In the mean time Sunrise from our soon-to-be Deck in Cottonwood.
MikeCWsunrise copy.JPG
 

ibglowin

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Sounds like that horse has left the barn and he ain't coming back! LOL Congrats on all the progress made this weekend!
 

ibglowin

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LOL I think I have 27 more work days between now and mid October. My retirement date will be Oct 31 but my last work day will be Oct 11. After that I will be burning the rest of my vacation leave until the end of the month. I had a close call a few weeks ago. Guy texting on his phone drifted into my lane going home for lunch and I was coming down a two lane road with a steep hill with guard rails on both sides so no place to bail out. I started honking and braking and pulling to the right as far as I could go without hitting the rail and he finally looked up I guess and saw me and yanked it back into his lane. I had to pull over at the bottom and call Mrs IB. as I was literally shaking. I just said to heck with it not going to worry about making it until January. Going at my earliest possible departure date.

Said the guy trying to figure out how to show up to work 3 outta the next 6 months before heading into the sunset.
 

geek

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LOL I think I have 27 more work days between now and mid October. My retirement date will be Oct 31 but my last work day will be Oct 11. After that I will be burning the rest of my vacation leave until the end of the month. I had a close call a few weeks ago. Guy texting on his phone drifted into my lane going home for lunch and I was coming down a two lane road with a steep hill with guard rails on both sides so no place to bail out. I started honking and braking and pulling to the right as far as I could go without hitting the rail and he finally looked up I guess and saw me and yanked it back into his lane. I had to pull over at the bottom and call Mrs IB. as I was literally shaking. I just said to heck with it not going to worry about making it until January. Going at my earliest possible departure date.

Wow, glad nothing happened..!!
 

Kraffty

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Over the last 10 weeks or so I got quotes from 3 different companies to dig test holes and test soils at the site so that foundation footings could be designed to handle the build. They’ll be required by the city during the permit process so why not get it done now. My excavator, neighbor Jim, who dug the holes for me, called to tell me before samples were taken that he encountered a type of material call “Caliche” which can be a common problem in Arizona. It’s a buried layer of soil cemented together by calcium carbonate and can be varying thicknesses. Worst case is digging extra wide and deep trenches and filling with engineered materials before pouring the footings. While I figured this was probably the first of many “that’s going to cost a little more” moments, the test results came back fine and no special treatment was specified for foundation. It does make me wonder how I’m going to dig for grape vines down the road. With that certificate in hand my blueprints could finally get going in earnest. I got schooled by my architect a bit about different types of roofs and what I could or couldn’t have - affordably - and still have the interior space I wanted in the center of the house. There are going to be a lot of parts of this where I just have to lean on the experience of the people I’ve hired. It’s been about a week since giving an official OK to start the drawings and I hope to see a draft soon.

I also got my first taste of dealing with municipal utilities with mixed results but I wouldn’t give it a bad rating so far. In order to get an accurate estimate to hook up utilities the Water Company has to have a filed permit application before giving any numbers, it’s too early to file for permits and yet they won’t give me a rough idea with out it. I talked to the Gas Company yesterday and they were at the other end of the spectrum, Rhonda emailed me maps of the neighborhood and our lot with gas line placements and a rough estimate of just a few hundred dollars to basically hook up a double meter next to the neighbors meter which is on the property line. I was expecting several thousand dollars on this one. She just emailed me that she drove out and checked it in person and confirmed that there would be no extra charges involved. Hope to run into more of those kind of people.

We’ve shut the office down, moved home and set up shop in the house temporarily. We were originally going to share Lori’s office on the big secretary type desk I built for her but at the last minute I opted to take over the spare room instead. After two weeks I can say it was a good decision. My focus is split between our existing business and house planning and I have much more room this way, she does too. (I finally have my “corner office” Pic attached along with goofy pics of the grandkids on the walls) Lastly it’s reward time. Buying a pickup truck has been in my plans, if for no other reason, as an essential tool as we build this house - not to mention the upcoming move. Ford is offering 0% financing on F150’s and I want a base XL model 2 door with full size bed. Friends are suggesting or advising getting a super cab instead and say the 6.5 bed will be fine for 99.9% of what I need, guess I’ll consider that option as well. Plan to look at some tomorrow and will hopefully pick one up. It’s nice not to be in a rush mode, if we get a decent deal we’ll buy, if not there’s always next month.
newoffice.jpg

We’re somewhere between 16 and 20 weeks from putting our house up for sale. An agent we’ve worked with in the past has been given the heads up that the listing is her’s. Neither Lori or I have an interest in hanging around for the process so we’ll rent a house near our new property - ahead of listing our house - and move at that point. I guess temporary house hunting is on the horizon…..

I’d also like to share an important note. Lori can be an organizational fool when needed. The logistics of closing down and moving our business went very smoothly, even finished way ahead of schedule. She’s been constantly reminding my of how quickly time’s passing and where we need to be at certain stages of this process. If I can stay half as organized as her I think this project may actually succeed, as if that’s an option once we get even deeper in to it.

Mike
 

balatonwine

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Buying a pickup truck has been in my plans,

Just curios: Why?

I had a pickup once. Turned out to not be what I really needed. Ended up finally with an SUV and a trailer. Much better for me since most of what I needed to move "daily" and long term (such as beyond just "moving" which is a one off issue) needed some weather protection, and all else could go in the trailer.

But that was just me of course. :)
 

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