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What beer should I brew next?

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Jhoinsmath

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I have recently dove (dived, diven, doved?) head first into home brewing and have to decide what beer to brew next. I have successfully brewed a St. Arnold's Amber, an Irish Red, an American Brown, and a honey Amber (extremely delicious).
The options I'm currently considering are:
Kolsch
English Brown
Weizen Bock (as an ale)
Honey Wheat
Hefeweizen
Octoberfest (although I'm thinking about holding off on this one for a month so it will be in it's prime for December)
Thoughts or other suggestions?
 

Wine&Ale

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Nothing like a nice pale ale in my opinion. Welcome to the forum. Do you also make wine or just beer?
 

smurfe

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I am guessing you are in the Houston TX area? I love St Arnold Amber. Their Brown Ale is pretty tasty to. I have to agree with the other poster, a Pale Ale would always be my first choice. Of your list though, I would do the Brown Ale. I am not a fan of wheat beers though. Can you lager? If so, I might do the Oktoberfest. Did you mean the Oktoberfest would be in its prime next December?
 
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TheTooth

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What you make next depends on what you want to drink next. The Oktoberfest is a tough one because it'll need some time to lager and age before you'll want to drink it. Unless you have other beer made that you can drink while it does this, I'd put it on the back burner while you brew up some others.

A Kolsch also likes to spend 4-6 weeks in cold aging after fermentation is complete, so I'd hold off on it. When summer comes, I'd make the hefeweizen, then the kolsch soon after. That way, you can enjoy the hefe (which is better young) while the Kolsch gets a little time in the chill chest.

Weizenbocks are typically pretty big beers. I made one early this year at 9%abv and it wasn't very good until it had 6 months of aging to mellow out that alcohol bite. It's great now, but that's 9 months after brewing.

So... if it were me I'd make the English brown. I'd do that now, but I already have a keg in my cellar waiting for an open tap. LOL
 

Malkore

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kolsch..its very cold fermenting ale yeast (you HAVE to use a kolsch yeast!) which means it'll be easy to control those ferm. temps this time of year.

I've made a good oktoberfest using kolsch yeast too, so you could always do that next and just reuse the yeast cake, save you some cash.
 

mxsteve625

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I don't thinink you can go wrong with an American Pale Ale. It's easy and forgiving. I just finished two cases of this and thought it to be the best of my brews to date. I am preparing another batch.
 
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gawine

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Hey, to late for that Stout, it will be ready in March, summer around the corner after that for us here in the South! I say Amber Ale or Copper Ale. I myself may try taht or this Liberty Cream Ale from Midwest just cause it's a crowd pleaser next.
 

TheTooth

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Hey, to late for that Stout, it will be ready in March, summer around the corner after that for us here in the South! I say Amber Ale or Copper Ale. I myself may try taht or this Liberty Cream Ale from Midwest just cause it's a crowd pleaser next.
It's never too late for a stout! We keep a stout and/or porter on tap year-round.
 

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