Sugar to Invert Sugar

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QuiQuog

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Let me start with some assumptions that I’ve learned recently, then I’ll get to my question.

Invert sugar is sweeter than table sugar because the fructose and glucose are separated and are somehow sweeter.

Invert sugar doesn’t get sweeter over time in wine.

Sugar gets sweeter over time in wine as the acid separates the fructose and glucose.

Now onto my question. During the clearing step using super kleer I had some excess SP that I separated into 3 different wine bottles. In one I used the recommended out of sugar, which turned out to be about 1/4 cup per bottle (feel free to check my math on that.) in another I added 1/8th of a cup. In the third I added 1/4 cup of invert sugar that went to caramel that I mentioned in a previous post. I want to be able to taste the various sweetness levels in the test bottles after they’ve reached maximum sweetness. How long does it take for the sugar in skeeter pee to reach maximum sweetness?
 

winemanden

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I don't know abour SP, but some yeasts leave a small amount of residual sugar in wine.
Generally speaking, if the original gravity is below the ABV tolerance of your yeast and the final gravity is down below 1.000 it' should be a dry wine.

Rightly or wrongly, I think the main advantage of invert sugar is a possibly quicker start to a ferment. In any case the yeast inverts the sugar naturally during the fermenation.
 

QuiQuog

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Maybe you’re right, but I’m talking about back sweetening. It’s common knowledge, at least in these forums, that if you back sweeten with plain sugar, it will get sweeter over time as the acid in the wine separates the two sugars. I’m wondering how long it takes for the regular sugar to reach maximum sweetness after it’s added.
 

winemanden

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It's all a matter of taste! There's pros and cons for all methods.
Just as a matter of curiousity, has anyone done bench tests on back sweetening? I mean by trying different sweeteners on the same batch of wine and doing a taste comparison after aging them.
 

BigDaveK

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As I understand it, yeast uses fructose and glucose. It has to break down the sucrose into those two. That's why invert sugar leads to a quicker starting ferment - the yeast doesn't have to work on converting, as winemanden said.
 

Hazelemere

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It's all a matter of taste! There's pros and cons for all methods.
Just as a matter of curiousity, has anyone done bench tests on back sweetening? I mean by trying different sweeteners on the same batch of wine and doing a taste comparison after aging them.
back sweetening with unpasteurized honey and sorbate can be excellent. I back sweeten with honey over and over. Sometimes honey instead of sugar in a fruit wine e.g. apple to increase SG to make a cyser and sometimes just to sweeten from a fruit wine e.g. Melomel or say a second run grape wine e.g. pressed white wine grape skins with pectic enzyme to make a white pyment.
 

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