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Should high PH wines avoid MLF?

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Vinoors

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I was planning on doing an MLF, but with a PH level (no clue about TA) of around 3.8/3.9- do you think it should be avoided? My understanding is that MLF only increases PH, and I wouldn't want to do that considering I'm close to 4.0. This is for 85% Zin, 10% Petite Syrah, 5% Cabernet Sauvignon. Brix was around 26º, fermenting at the moment with RP15.
 

Smok1

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My syrah and merlot had high ph (3.9/4.0) i adjusted down to 3.6 with tartaric acid, ta was .7 after adjustment. Coinnoculated mlf and mlf completed in 7 days. Did a chromo test on the weekend. They both smell really good. After mlf ph is now at 3.8
 

Vinoors

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I see- given that I haven't added tartaric acid, in concerned I'll end up north of 4.0
 

Ajmassa

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I'm in the same boat. I Had a high Ph of 3.9. Didn't adjust.
Co-inoculated malo during fermentation
MLF finished in less than 2 weeks but brought my ph to 4.0. Literally doing the math and weighing some acid right now to add some tartaric to bring it down some.
Actually I'm going by TA. 7.25 before fermentation. Now 5.4. I'm going to add enough to bring it back up to 7.0.
And will add half of what I need 1st because tartaric has tendency to raise TA by more than what the numbers theoretically should do. (Learned that one the hard way initially)
 

Johny99

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I see- given that I haven't added tartaric acid, in concerned I'll end up north of 4.0
I’d say that is likely. So, if you don’t want to add acid, I’d avoid MLF. If you have a bit of acid, you can do as AJ is.

What does the taste tell you? Is the acid about right? Too much/too little? TA is about taste, pH protection. Usually they go hand in hand, but not always. If acid tastes right, I’d forgo mlf. I like mlf with my reds, but not if it is going to take a nice wine to flatness.
 

Ajmassa

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My wine has a long way to go and I'm going to be putting in some work over the next or weeks.
BUT.... in spite of that I can honestly say that my current batch with a high pH that went through successful MLF without a doubt just benefited from a tartaric acid addition. Just that little bit I could notice it was much more closer to being balanced I guess you'd say. And could even use a little more.
Going by TA and target of 7.0 g/l I added half and my numbers came in exactly half. Go figure.
From 5.4 to 6.15 And 4.0 ph to 3.8.

I would still feel more comfortable getting that pH down closer to 3.6. Not enough time in the day though.
What I'm saying is I think you could definitely benefit from doing MLF. And if needed making a tartaric acid in this afterward. You've got a bunch of demijohns going correct? Why not do MLF on a couple of them to see how it goes without risking the whole batch?
 

Vinoors

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Thanks for all the input. I'm going to play it by ear and try to avoid acidulating and probably will bypass MLF. On the one hand, this is the 1st year we've even used cultivated yeast and nutrients- so I'm curious to taste the difference relative to wild fermentation. Ive got a couple separate related questions that I will post in a new thread.
 
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