Rescued vineyard, following 3 vines, pruned differently.

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VinesnBines

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I thought the variety determined the pruning and trellising methods. If the fruit is born closer to the ends of the cane, it was cane pruned. If the fruit is born closer to the cordon (or spurs), it was spur pruned.
I know Nebbiolo has to be cane pruned because it will not bear on the first four buds nearest the trunk or cordon. Otherwise, I don’t know which varieties bear close or far from the cordon.
 

TurkeyHollow

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On the vines @NorCal showed (the good, the bad & the ugly), is that a type of algae on them? I'm in the North East and have something very similar looking on trees. I'm now wondering if that is going to affect my vines or if it has any impact on the quality of vine/fruit health. Still fairly new to the vineyard side so all info is appreciated.
 

TurkeyHollow

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I know Nebbiolo has to be cane pruned because it will not bear on the first four buds nearest the trunk or cordon. Otherwise, I don’t know which varieties bear close or far from the cordon.
Good to know as I've looked for data on varieties and best trellis / pruning practices... I guess there are no hard fast rules. The things I've read aren't practiced in local vineyards. I'm just trying to understand their decisions so I can be comfortable with mine as we expand.
 

NorCal

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I personally would do a few things:

Preserve two well positioned canes in the head of the vine that could be used to replace the cordons.
Continue to shoot thin the spurs until there are 2-3 canes that reach pencil thickness on each spur.
Around harvest before the rains start either prune the spurs down to the lowest cane that reached 2 feet long, or decide the cordons are bad and cut them off and lay down the renewal canes you preserved.

Cutting off the cordons now will push the new canes and cause them to grow long internodes and that makes bad cordons. If that happens, the lateral shoots off a cane are good for new arms because of their short internodes.
I‘ll let this year ride. I was planning on pruning strategy in Januar of next year, given how the vines turned out. Of the ugly there will not be any well positioned shoots for next year, because of how I pruned it.
 

NorCal

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On the vines @NorCal showed (the good, the bad & the ugly), is that a type of algae on them? I'm in the North East and have something very similar looking on trees. I'm now wondering if that is going to affect my vines or if it has any impact on the quality of vine/fruit health. Still fairly new to the vineyard side so all info is appreciated.
It’s a lichen I believe. I know it can’t be good for the health of the vines. This vineyard went neglected for many years prior to my purchase last year. I knock it off when I can and hoping a few sprays with controlled copper will help eradicate it.
 

TurkeyHollow

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It’s a lichen I believe. I know it can’t be good for the health of the vines. This vineyard went neglected for many years prior to my purchase last year. I knock it off when I can and hoping a few sprays with controlled copper will help eradicate it.
I'm glad to hear that it was on neglected vines - not that you had to deal with it but that it may not happen on vines cared for. Like I said, I had what looks to be the same thing on some Hickory trees and it just brushed off (didn't have a real "grip" on the bark. It looks like your vines are well lignified so it may be fairly easily remediated. Either way, good luck - the vines all look like pruning will bring them right back.
 
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What is interesting to me is the lichen seems to indicate you have high humidity. I have never heard of lichen hurting the underlying plant. It does not extend deeper than the top of the bark. Sulfur spray might knock it back also.
 

NorCal

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Update. 3 sprayings to date, 4th planned tomorrow. No signs of mildew, which wiped the vineyard out last year, before I bought it. Minor hedging to keep the rows apart, with a fresh weed mowing. Have not started irrigation yet.
E0E075B6-39C6-4CA9-A384-EA7A6FAC20BB.jpeg

The Good, vigorous and 10 big clusters. Will leaf thin later, but we have some brutal 100 degree days coming up.

856CB70C-5564-4D6F-A850-643EF416968A.jpeg

The Bad, 13 medium clusters. Much more consistent growth, lots of fruit.

8EB781CD-8207-40E7-AF87-AC161851D290.jpeg

The Ugly, 3 clusters. Confirms I should have called it a lost year and focused on developing 2 new cordons, given the health of the current cordon.
3B3295DA-F90F-49EA-9227-F75D77CB05C0.jpeg
 
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I also have been trying to improve cordon health by half measures, cut of one arm then the other arm next year, etc. It's kind of working but I have seen new cordons have problems with eutypa also. I could have gotten a bud started down the trunk and top work that into a new cordon then chop off the old cordon. Now I am thinking I should cut off whole cordons and get some water shoots going and rework the cordon. Even if I lose 2 years, ugh.
 
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