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RJ Spagnols Is the oak flavor prominent in kits?

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skyfire322

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Since the kit I was looking at ended up being out of stock (Cab, Malbec, Carmenere blend *sad face*), I was looking at a Sangiovese Merlot blend (RJS).

The oak is labeled as "Medium" so I was curious; if I want a bit more of an "oaky" flavor, would it be overkill since (I'm assuming) they add oak essence in the juice? Or does most of that oak aroma dissipate during fermentation?
 

Brian55

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Since the kit I was looking at ended up being out of stock (Cab, Malbec, Carmenere blend *sad face*), I was looking at a Sangiovese Merlot blend (RJS).

The oak is labeled as "Medium" so I was curious; if I want a bit more of an "oaky" flavor, would it be overkill since (I'm assuming) they add oak essence in the juice? Or does most of that oak aroma dissipate during fermentation?
We add extra oak to all our reds during bulk aging.
 

bkisel

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It really depends... I say generally no but to my wife's taste any amount of oak in a wine is to her "prominent".
 

ceeaton

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I'd ferment your kit and follow the directions. Then, depending on the type of oak and when it was added (if there are cubes later in the process you may have to wait longer), take a sample, degass it and try it and see what you think about the oak. Realize that the longer it ages the more oak will integrate into the wine and become less prevalent.

If you think it needs a bit more, add some cubes or a spiral or even some chips. Test every week or so, and when the oak becomes a little too much, take it out. As it ages it will integrate and become less prominent, and hopefully in a few years be what you were looking for.

Take good notes and modify your oak depending on the outcome you initially get. Never said it was a quick process, but at some point you will make a wine that YOU like, don't depend on others to define your oak preferences. Use some good note taking and methodical increments of oak to figure out what you like. And most of all have fun drinking your experiments!
 

DoctorCAD

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I don't think kits use oak essence. Every kit I have done that comes with oak has had sawdust or chips.

I use cubes when I want more oak. Medium toast Hungarian.
 

Boatboy24

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To my taste, many kits are light on oak - but certainly not all. I have some that I've oaked by the book and have thought it was very heavy. In general, I'd say follow the instructions early on, but save oak cubes for bulk aging after the wine is clear. Then add the oak and taste every few weeks. Cubes will give up oak for about 6 weeks. If you want more after that, go for it.
 

skyfire322

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Thanks for all the input! It seems that general consensus is adding it all during bulk aging which definitely makes much more sense then what I was thinking. Now that I know this, it's time to order that kit!!! :db
 
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