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"domesticating" wild grapes

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BobF

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I recently did a bit of habitat restoration on part of my property. This involved removing overgrowth and brush with a bit of thinning to restore a savannah environment. Next step, seed with native grasses/forbs.

During this process I discovered quite a few wild grape vines. I haven't identified the specific variety ...

The larger ones ended up chopped back to anywhere from 3 to 8' in length. These have all developed new shoots. There are also a number of new vines popping up where sunlight has been restored to the floor.

Here's my question(s):

What is the best process for using these to start a planting for actual production?

Is it too late to dig up and relocate the new starts? Should I layer them in place instead?


These may not end up any good for wine, but they are obviously well adapted to the climate and local diseases/pests - so I have to give it a try!!
 

grapeman

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I don't think it is a good idea to begin a small vineyard or even home planting with an unknow-probably wild vine. Unless you know they were cultivated varieties at some time, they are probably native grape vines and will be inferior in almost all aspects of winemaking. They obviously are hardy and adaptable, but that doesn't make wine. Natives are generally extremely high in acids. They can be diluted, but then have low sugar and they can give way too many tannins.

I would begin with known varieties of grapes you like the wine from.
 

BobF

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I don't think it is a good idea to begin a small vineyard or even home planting with an unknow-probably wild vine. Unless you know they were cultivated varieties at some time, they are probably native grape vines and will be inferior in almost all aspects of winemaking. They obviously are hardy and adaptable, but that doesn't make wine. Natives are generally extremely high in acids. They can be diluted, but then have low sugar and they can give way too many tannins.

I would begin with known varieties of grapes you like the wine from.
Thanx. This is an experimental effort at most. I've decided to see what happens this year and possibly do cuttings this fall.
 

Boyd

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wid grapes

I would go for it.

I have made wine with wild grapes for a few years and I am told it is very good.

It is my youngest daughters favorite.

Have some vines I started from seed a year ago o see wha happens.
 

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