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Ajmassa

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So2 testing ain’t cheap. And I know lots of people avoid those titrets for red wine. It says so right on the packaging “recommended for white wines”.
But they CAN be used for red wine. It’s just not as easy to see color change. They give accurate enough readings for what we need. And if not investing in a more expensive method-there’s no need to choose to not test at all instead of using titrets.
This was checking the level after dosing at crush a couple months ago.
IMG_1968.jpg
A box of 10 tests is about $20. I also bought the “titrator” which makes it even easier to use.
IMG_1970.jpg
Each test is in a prefilled glass titret and a rubber tip for suction of sample. There is a white line and black line on the tip.
IMG_1969.jpg
The hose gets inserted into the tip and pushed down until it reaches the white line. The black mark is scored and the point where it needs to be broken.
Insert the titret up through the titrator, hose end first and push all the in. When you bring that lever down it will crack the tip on that black line
IMG_1973.jpg
IMG_1974.jpg
Once cracked and the solution drops into the glass it turns black. This is the starting color. Finishing color is when the sample turns back to original color of the wine.
IMG_1976.jpg
Now it’s just a matter of pulling enough sample until finished. Just need to start going slow when it gets close. No different than a TA test by color change. There’s a little bead within the plastic hose tip you press on to pull up some wine
IMG_1977.jpg
Now At the point when you start pulling in very small increments and checking color. This one is at 36ppm and color still darker.
IMG_1978.jpg
34ppm. Sample Still darker than the wine.
IMG_1979.jpg
31ppm still noticeable darker
IMG_1983.jpg
26ppm looks pretty close. Maybe a hair darker
IMG_1985.jpg
And 23ppm looks right on the money.

Not exact- but it’s definitely close enough. Better to have an idea than to not know at all. Figured this might be helpful to anyone who has dismissed using these for red wine without actually trying.
 
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Ajmassa

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Well I knew a lot people don’t really view these as a realistic so2 testing option for reds. But I’ve been using these without complaints for a few years now. I might test a wine 3x total. At crush- after MLF - and before bottling. And once in a blue I’ll test the level AFTER dosing- and always end up hitting the mark i was shooting for.
I use fermcalc http://web2.airmail.net/sgross/fermcalc/FermCalcJS.html to calculate the amount for whatever my target is. It takes everything into account. And i use the so2/ph chart to get my target.

62A1B5F8-0CAB-4BF4-888F-2F3331592492.jpeg
 
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Johnd

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Well I knew a lot people don’t really view these as a realistic so2 testing option for reds. But I’ve been using these without complaints for a few years now. I might test a wine 3x total. At crush- after MLF - and before bottling. And once in a blue I’ll test the level AFTER dosing- and always end up hitting the mark i was shooting for.
I use fermcalc http://web2.airmail.net/sgross/fermcalc/FermCalcJS.html to calculate the amount for whatever my target is. It takes everything into account. And i use the so2/ph chart to get my target. View attachment 49680
You do know that the chart you posted is the .8 molecular level chart.......the one we use for whites. See attached chart with both red and white depicted.

F3F2B308-16F6-4DA0-8230-D957F20F5E5E.png
 

FTC Wines

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A J , great presentation, tried using that a few years ago & gave up. Your tutorial should help many have sucess! Finally looked around the winery room, realized what we had invested then said $300 for a Vinmetric 300 is probably a good investment. LOL, Roy
 

Ajmassa

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You do know that the chart you posted is the .8 molecular level chart.......the one we use for whites. See attached chart with both red and white depicted.

View attachment 49682
Thanks John. Good catch. I will edit that so it’s clear for readers. For whatever reason I couldn’t find the actual chart I typically use. Maybe because it was 2 am! That one was from morewine so2 manual. And .8 Molecular would be the max to use in my “graph of choice” here. Regardless- I’m always rounding down my targets and dosage- and rounding up current level anyway to keep so2 at a minimum. I need to print one of these out one day and put it on the wall in the wineroom. IMG_3917.jpg.
 

Ajmassa

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A J , great presentation, tried using that a few years ago & gave up. Your tutorial should help many have sucess! Finally looked around the winery room, realized what we had invested then said $300 for a Vinmetric 300 is probably a good investment. LOL, Roy
Thanks. The vinmetrica is on my list 100%. But im going for broke— the vinmetrica SC-300 with the “pro-kit”. All the bells and whistles. And the add-on YAN testing kit to boot. Rather expensive- and not exactly at the top of life’s priority list.
Waiting for my ph meter to crap out on me before being forced to make a purchase. Until then- I’ll happily keep using these so2 titrets.
 

Mario Dinis

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So2 testing ain’t cheap. And I know lots of people avoid those titrets for red wine. It says so right on the packaging “recommended for white wines”.
But they CAN be used for red wine. It’s just not as easy to see color change. They give accurate enough readings for what we need. And if not investing in a more expensive method-there’s no need to choose to not test at all instead of using titrets.
This was checking the level after dosing at crush a couple months ago.
View attachment 49665
A box of 10 tests is about $20. I also bought the “titrator” which makes it even easier to use.
View attachment 49666
Each test is in a prefilled glass titret and a rubber tip for suction of sample. There is a white line and black line on the tip.
View attachment 49667
The hose gets inserted into the tip and pushed down until it reaches the white line. The black mark is scored and the point where it needs to be broken.
Insert the titret up through the titrator, hose end first and push all the in. When you bring that lever down it will crack the tip on that black line
View attachment 49669
View attachment 49670
Once cracked and the solution drops into the glass it turns black. This is the starting color. Finishing color is when the sample turns back to original color of the wine.
View attachment 49671
Now it’s just a matter of pulling enough sample until finished. Just need to start going slow when it gets close. No different than a TA test by color change. There’s a little bead within the plastic hose tip you press on to pull up some wine
View attachment 49672
Now At the point when you start pulling in very small increments and checking color. This one is at 36ppm and color still darker.
View attachment 49673
34ppm. Sample Still darker than the wine.
View attachment 49674
31ppm still noticeable darker
View attachment 49675
26ppm looks pretty close. Maybe a hair darker
View attachment 49676
And 23ppm looks right on the money.

Not exact- but it’s definitely close enough. Better to have an idea than to not know at all. Figured this might be helpful to anyone who has dismissed using these for red wine without actually trying.
A "bit" late, but thanks for sharing. Just learned something new.
 

Mario Dinis

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So2 testing ain’t cheap. And I know lots of people avoid those titrets for red wine. It says so right on the packaging “recommended for white wines”.
But they CAN be used for red wine. It’s just not as easy to see color change. They give accurate enough readings for what we need. And if not investing in a more expensive method-there’s no need to choose to not test at all instead of using titrets.
This was checking the level after dosing at crush a couple months ago.
View attachment 49665
A box of 10 tests is about $20. I also bought the “titrator” which makes it even easier to use.
View attachment 49666
Each test is in a prefilled glass titret and a rubber tip for suction of sample. There is a white line and black line on the tip.
View attachment 49667
The hose gets inserted into the tip and pushed down until it reaches the white line. The black mark is scored and the point where it needs to be broken.
Insert the titret up through the titrator, hose end first and push all the in. When you bring that lever down it will crack the tip on that black line
View attachment 49669
View attachment 49670
Once cracked and the solution drops into the glass it turns black. This is the starting color. Finishing color is when the sample turns back to original color of the wine.
View attachment 49671
Now it’s just a matter of pulling enough sample until finished. Just need to start going slow when it gets close. No different than a TA test by color change. There’s a little bead within the plastic hose tip you press on to pull up some wine
View attachment 49672
Now At the point when you start pulling in very small increments and checking color. This one is at 36ppm and color still darker.
View attachment 49673
34ppm. Sample Still darker than the wine.
View attachment 49674
31ppm still noticeable darker
View attachment 49675
26ppm looks pretty close. Maybe a hair darker
View attachment 49676
And 23ppm looks right on the money.

Not exact- but it’s definitely close enough. Better to have an idea than to not know at all. Figured this might be helpful to anyone who has dismissed using these for red wine without actually trying.
Just ordered this same kit to start experimenting.
 

rustbucket

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Ajmassa,
Thanks for the great write up on how to use titrets for red wine. I bought a box of titrets about 8 months ago but put them aside when I noticed that the box label said for while wines only. Now, as a result of your post, I will be using them. I'll be bottling six gallons of Malbec in January and will use the titrets to make sure that the batch has the proper sulfate level prior to bottling.
 

Mario Dinis

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Ajmassa,
Thanks for the great write up on how to use titrets for red wine. I bought a box of titrets about 8 months ago but put them aside when I noticed that the box label said for while wines only. Now, as a result of your post, I will be using them. I'll be bottling six gallons of Malbec in January and will use the titrets to make sure that the batch has the proper sulfate level prior to bottling.
Indeed it was a great post. I ordered one for myself.
 

jgmillr1

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I built an AO unit pretty inexpensively. (This method is essentially the gold standard.)

It is simplyIMG_20191211_085118936_resize_4.jpg a stand that holds a couple big test tubes, an aquarium pump to flow air, reagents you can buy anywhere, two 2-hole stoppers, glass tubing I cut to length and some hosing to fit over it.
 

Mario Dinis

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How do you manage to draw a wine sample with this thing? I gave up on it. The scored tip of vial stays in the rube and I squeezed the bead and nothing comes in. What a fiasco.
 
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