Cab Franc yeast & mlb recommendation(s) for fruit forward wine?

Discussion in 'Wine Making from Grapes' started by NorCal, Jul 19, 2019.

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  1. Jul 19, 2019 #1

    NorCal

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    The availability of Mourvèdre fell through, so it looks like I’ll do another 60 gallon of Cab Franc. I want to make the absolute best Cab Franc possible, regardless of how much work it takes. I’m looking to make a real fruit forward wine, with minimal or no blending, as I have typically done in the past (Petite Sirah, Petit Verdot).

    Any recommendations on yeast(s), mlb or process steps to use for a wine that will be:
    Fruit forward wine (most important)
    Fruit from single shoot, head trained, 18 year old vines
    Lightly crushed and pressed
    25-26 brix / 3.5-3.7 pH
    Lightly oaked with French oak spirals
    Barrel aged 11-18 months
    AA6B2A58-5FCC-42A8-886A-4E02D749048F.jpeg
     
  2. Jul 20, 2019 #2

    cmason1957

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    Would there be any sense in not doing putting the wine through mlf to encourage it to be more fruit-forward?
     
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  3. Jul 20, 2019 #3

    CDrew

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    Subscribing to thread.

    You are far more experienced than me or most here. But, how about more of that Renaissance Yeast? That's a clean fermentor, should leave the fruit flavors intact. And maybe harvest at the upper end of the brix range for "ripe" fruit flavors. Then a light touch with the oak, and good to go. The Petite Sirah I fermented with that yeast is "fruit forward" even now still in the tank.

    The vines are looking great at Clos du Lac. It should be a nice harvest and if the schedule works, I hope to purchase some of the Cab Franc too. I'm thinking the proper way is through Sac Valley Home Winemakers? Unfortunately my job involves a lot of weekends and it makes counting on things difficult.

    Good luck with this year's project. And thanks again for inviting me to the tasting. I took the tasting notes home, and appreciated all the critique good and bad. My favorite was, "drink it up". Lol. I'll work on that.
     
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  4. Jul 20, 2019 #4

    NorCal

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    Great idea, I would also gain in the acid retention.
     
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  5. Jul 20, 2019 #5

    Johnd

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    I’d think that you’d need to taste it to see if you’ll skip MLF, most reds benefit, including those that are considered fruit forward. I’d propose that your best approach is from the fermenting process, and if I were attempting this, I’d approach from there.

    My yeast selection would be from the chart below, a combo of D-21 and D-254, I’d ferment very cool for fruit retention, do concurrent MLF (tartness may mask some of the fruity taste, a smooth wine let’s it all hang out), punch down easy or do gentle pumpovers, try not to extract too much tannin from your (probably) well ripened grapes, not do any barrel aging, do some taste testing to see what little smidges of sugar and glycerine do to the fruit taste, and bottle. But that’s me......... 4BBBA1FD-1DC7-4CBE-9040-BC02650B3D95.png
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2019
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  6. Jul 20, 2019 #6

    mainshipfred

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    As CDrew mentioned you all have more experience than me. I can't speak for Cab Franc, yeast or MLB but last year, for no particular reason, I did an oaked and unoaked Merlot and the unoaked is noticeably more fruit forward than the oaked.
     
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  7. Jul 20, 2019 #7

    Johnd

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    I've also noticed the same in my winemaking, particularly before I began barrel aging, and have read that this is a generally true characteristic. Wines also lose their "fruitiness" as they age, those "in your face" flavors giving way to more mature and mellow flavors with time in the bottle, hence, getting it bottled as soon as practical and enjoying it during its early years. Definitely not to say that it won't be good later in life!!!
     
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  8. Jul 20, 2019 #8

    jgmillr1

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    I would also look into limiting the skin fermentation to just a couple days. Seems to me the longer the skin contact time and punching down just drives away the fruity esters. This makes the wine more toward the Beaujolais style.
     
  9. Jul 20, 2019 #9

    NorCal

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    Thanks for the suggestions. I made a saignee Mourvèdre in 2015 that turned out fruity, I’m not sure the increased juice to skin ratio would have the same effect or not.
     

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