Blending for deeper red wine

Discussion in 'Wine Making from Grapes' started by Tony_Tiz, Nov 10, 2019 at 7:12 PM.

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  1. Nov 10, 2019 at 7:12 PM #1

    Tony_Tiz

    Tony_Tiz

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    What grape variety can I add to my must to get a deeper color red in my wine? The last two years, the wine came out good but was on the lighter side. I've heard Alicante is a good grape for blending or maybe Petite Sirah.
     
  2. Nov 10, 2019 at 8:58 PM #2

    CDrew

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    If this is from grapes, you might try enzymes first, and maybe some sacrificial tannin too. I had the same issue as you 3 years ago. The wine was good but light in color and body. The issue was completely resolved with Lallzyme

    But Petite Sirah is very dark, and easy to find. Alicante is around, but much much less common. And make sure the flavors are complimentary. Like Petite Sirah is great blended 10-20% into Zinfandel but I probably wouldn't want it blended into an already high tannin wine.
     
  3. Nov 10, 2019 at 11:07 PM #3

    Tony_Tiz

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    Hey Thanks CDrew. I probably should've put this in a little more context. Yes, this is grapes not juice. To be specific, about 4 lugs on Sangiovese. I used RC212 and I did added Pectic Enzyme. I got the grapes late this year so there wasnt much of a choice. When you say Lallzyme, is that different than Pectic Enzyme? I know Pectic increases volume, does Lallzyme intense the color? I've only been doing this for about 2 seasons, what's sacrificial tannin?
     
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  4. Nov 11, 2019 at 12:52 AM #4

    CDrew

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    The Lallzyme is a pectinase and cellulase enzyme package. It must be highly refined because you use tiny amounts of it. It is said to release more color compounds from the skins and I believe it. I have used the EX and the EX-V and like both.

    Sacrificial tannins are small amounts of tannin that are said to increase the binding of the grape color compounds in the wine. Maybe that's true, and I've been happy with the results. I just use small amounts of FT Rouge as recommended by Morewine:
    https://morewinemaking.com/products/tannin-ft-rouge.html

    And BTW-Sangiovese doesn't tend to be a very dark wine. Yours is probably just fine.
     
  5. Nov 11, 2019 at 12:54 AM #5

    Tony_Tiz

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    thank you so much... that absolutely helps
     
  6. Nov 11, 2019 at 1:01 AM #6

    jgmann67

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    For a sangio, maybe blend a Cab or Merlot (or both) and make yourself a nice Super Tuscan.
     
  7. Nov 11, 2019 at 1:06 AM #7

    Tony_Tiz

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    You know jgmann67, I should've done that. I've already done my first rack, getting ready to degas. The purpose of this thread was for next year. I went to my local store the second week of October, and all they had left for red grapes was 10 cases of Merlot and 4 cases of Sangio. Looking back I should've taken a couple of cases of Merlot but I didnt. But thanks so much for the input, I may try that next year.
     
  8. Nov 11, 2019 at 1:23 AM #8

    jgmann67

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    There’s nothing that prevents you from blending this year’s sangio with next year’s Merlot or Cab.

    It’s going to be a couple (or three) years before it’s ready to drink anyway.
     
  9. Nov 11, 2019 at 1:45 AM #9

    Tony_Tiz

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    OHH...that I did not know. Does it take that long because of the Sangiovese grape or is that common no matter what grape you use?
     
  10. Nov 11, 2019 at 1:51 AM #10

    CDrew

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    Look what I found on Wiki:

    "The high acidity and light body characteristics of the Sangiovese grape can present a problem for winemaking. The grape also lacks some of the color-creating phenolic compounds known as acylated anthocyanins."
     
  11. Nov 11, 2019 at 2:00 AM #11

    Tony_Tiz

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    thanks CD. Maybe I'll takes JGs advice and blend it with next years wine.
     
  12. Nov 11, 2019 at 2:07 AM #12

    jgmann67

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    Reds generally take a few years to mature. Whites a year or two.
     
  13. Nov 11, 2019 at 2:08 AM #13

    Tony_Tiz

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    Ok thanks for that.
     
  14. Nov 11, 2019 at 1:51 PM #14

    buzi

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    You can try cold soaking too, but if you don't have a spare fridge or a cold environment, you have to pay attention to potential infection or natural fermentation. This year was great for it since we were a few weeks behind!
     
  15. Nov 11, 2019 at 1:51 PM #15

    bshef

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    Big, beefy, dry reds, take forever (2 years or more) to mature, mellow, meld, however you want to describe them.
     
  16. Nov 11, 2019 at 6:10 PM #16

    MiBor

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    I've added a lug of Alicante grapes to 5 lugs of Cab that I processed this fall, for the same reason - to improve color. I also cold soaked for 3 days and used the Lallzyme EX-V and I'm happy with the color extraction, but the chalky taste of Alicante definitely altered the Cabernet Sauvignon taste. It's still good, but had I added more Alicante, I probably wouldn't have been happy with the results. Just my $0.02 on using Alicante as a teinturer for other varietals.

    At this point, the only way to fix the light color of your wine without blending is to use something like this:
    https://www.piwine.com/grape-skin-extract-1-oz.html
    I've used it in the past with good results and it doesn't affect the taste of the wine it is added to. Just make sure you do all your acid adjustments and fining before adding the grape skin extract, otherwise some of it will fall to the bottom of your storage container.
     

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