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tommyb

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Started a 3 gallon batch with about 27 lbs of apples and quickly found out that even in a 6 gallon bucket I've not no free standing liquid. In other words I've got a mostly solid volume of crushed apples. It seems like most recipes call for that much apple, so I guess what people are doing are juicing the apples instead of using them whole?

I've gone ahead and applied the yeast but I've got a bad feeling about how this is going to turn out.
 

pgentile

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Started a 3 gallon batch with about 27 lbs of apples and quickly found out that even in a 6 gallon bucket I've not no free standing liquid. In other words I've got a mostly solid volume of crushed apples. It seems like most recipes call for that much apple, so I guess what people are doing are juicing the apples instead of using them whole?

I've gone ahead and applied the yeast but I've got a bad feeling about how this is going to turn out.
I learned the same lesson a few weeks ago making a pear/apple wine. My grape press was inadequate for the job, I guess that's why there are cider presses.

I ended up putting everything through the food processor, but I've read of using juicers. But out of 50lbs of fruit I have four gallons of wine. Pectic enzyme also helped.
 

CK55

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I learned the same lesson a few weeks ago making a pear/apple wine. My grape press was inadequate for the job, I guess that's why there are cider presses.

I ended up putting everything through the food processor, but I've read of using juicers. But out of 50lbs of fruit I have four gallons of wine. Pectic enzyme also helped.
Thats kind of what happened with my latest sangiovese batch, i had 60 pounds of big fat clusters thought i was going to get like 3 gallons but i think im going to get double that when im done pressing.
 

Scooter68

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For what it's worth - For large quantities of apples or any fruit a standard home juicer, even the good Omega ones, will wear you out. I know, I did it a year ago with about 3/4 bushel of apples. The juice was great but NOT a good method for anything above a bushel.

Those old fashioned Apple crushers and cider presses are going to work a lot better. I just don't have enough apples to justify it.

And don't spare the Pectic Enzyme.
 

meadmaker1

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To press apples you need to grind them first. And as @Scooter68 said a standard juicer does a good job but its a job for sure.
Using cut apples requires a liquid addition and water will leave you with a nice wine with little to no apple smell or taste. It takes a fat bunch of apples to make 5 gallons of juice.
 

tommyb

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Thanks to all, good to hear there is no magic bullet. I do have a juicer and a small press. Its a little strange that none of the apple wine recipes I read mentioned the problem with using whole fruit when dealing with apples. All of them just said to cut em up or use the food processor...just doesnt work when you have sturdy fruit like apples and up to 10 lbs per gallon.
 

meadmaker1

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There are very few recipes that can be followed as written. Use them as guidelines and post your plan. Folks here will suggest the problems you may encounter, as well as possible solutions.
 

abrewkat

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I'm having similar issues- I used 36 lbs of apples quartered and frozen (for a medium body apple wine) and added about 2 gal water and 2 gal apple cider (on sale at local grocery). Hardly any free liquid in it, so it's hard to stir, and yeast activity seems low. I have strained out half the apples so far and juiced them, think I'll pull out the rest and juice them too, and bring up volume with some more water and apple cider (probably a gallon of cider and balance water). LOTS of pulp in it so going to add some more pectic enzyme. I'm considering adding some more yeast (K1-V1116). This was started last weekend, yeast stalled. SG was high, that could be why. Started at 1.14 and has now reached 1.10. Sound reasonable? Will definitely juice or press apples next time! I'm headed for orchard country in a couple of weeks, think I'll take a look for a used fruit press while I'm there! Oh, did a batch of crab apple at the same time, halving and freezing those worked WAY better than the standard apple. It was racked to secondary a couple of days ago, and is cheerfully ticking along.
 

meadmaker1

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I recomend adding apple juice concentrate to match the added water. I add concentrate to apple juice to boost apple flavor.
Be sure to read the ingredient label. Labeling laws have more loop holes than tax law.
I was given some apple juice last year. Label said made from organically grown apples, which is probably true, but they added Ksorbate to give it shelf life. I didnt even think to look until fermentation didn't start
I was able to get it started but it took some doing and had to use a stronger yeast than planned.
 

abrewkat

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I hope it will be ok- the label on the cider I'm using only lists apples in the ingredients. It is a refrigerated product with a fairly short shelf life, so I'm thinking there are no preservatives. Thanks for the tip on the apple concentrate!
 

Scooter68

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A number of the 'folksy' wine recipes I've seen on site other than those dedicated to wine making use methods that stray far afield from well established methods for making wine. Their success may be more a result of good fortune than good practices.
 

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