Two different yeasts in 1 6 gallon batch. Why?

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BPL

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I have been making wine for about 3 years now, from fresh fruit wines to kits. I understand yeasts have different characteristics. I recently had a WE Dolcetto kit that came with 1118 and RC212. Of course I used both. My question centers around using two different yeasts in one batch. Looking at the Scott Labs handbook, 1118 has a neutral sensory effect and is competitive, and RC212 has a EVC/M sensory effect and a neutral competitive factor. So, why use the two yeasts together? It seems to me that if two packs of yeast was needed, two packs of RC212 would have been included. Sorry, I don't get it. And yes, I did do a search and read a bunch of posts, but nothing fit.
 

Ohio Bob

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For decades I only used 1 yeast per batch. A lot of my wines were “singular” in flavor, not very complex, boring.

After reading this forum for some time I discovered multiple yeasts. My juice buckets are only a few months old but I can taste that the nose is different from the middle, and the finish may be different as well. It’s still young but the wines seem to be more complex than when using a single yeast.
 

BPL

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EC-1118 is a reliable fermenter, that is not reputed to bring much other than that to the party. My guess is that these kit makers included EC-1118 to the package to make damn sure the fermentation completed.
Thanks. That is my thought also.
 
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Kit vendors formulate their products so beginners with no experienced help will produce a good result on the first try. EC-1118 is certainly the recommended yeast for that purpose.

I'm not sold on adding multiple yeasts to a batch, as it's more likely one will dominate. In the case of EC-1118 and RC-212, I'd expect the EC-1118 to win out, as it's a workhorse.

If it were me, I'd put the EC-1118 in the fridge, make an overnight starter with the RC-212, and inoculate the following day. Keep the EC-1118 in case you can't get a ferment going or if one gets stuck.
 

Ohio Bob

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Kit vendors formulate their products so beginners with no experienced help will produce a good result on the first try. EC-1118 is certainly the recommended yeast for that purpose.

I'm not sold on adding multiple yeasts to a batch, as it's more likely one will dominate. In the case of EC-1118 and RC-212, I'd expect the EC-1118 to win out, as it's a workhorse.

If it were me, I'd put the EC-1118 in the fridge, make an overnight starter with the RC-212, and inoculate the following day. Keep the EC-1118 in case you can't get a ferment going or if one gets stuck.
By multiple yeasts I meant 2g with one yeast, 2g with another yeast, and 2g with a third yeast. At S.G. of 1.020, rack each off the sludge and combine into a single carboy.
 

Nebbiolo020

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If you use more than 1 yeast one will take over and drive the fermentation and overwhelm or kill the other yeast, I have a Syrah I made where I split the must 3 ways and used 3 different yeasts individually in each fermentation vessel and then tasted the wines and blended after and it made a much better wine. If your going to use more than 1 yeast split the must and ferment them separate and then blend.
 

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