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making a fpac

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wildhair

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I do a LOT of canning (fruits, jams, vegies, etc.) and this is a really good idea. I have canned leftover syrup used in canning fruit, but I hadn't thought about this before for winemaking. Duh. I'm gonna do this for sure.

If I may make 1 suggestion -
Wash the jars and place them in the oven on low (or around 200 degrees) and pull them out of the oven to fill them. They are much less likely to break when filled with boiling syrup if the jar is
pre-heated close to the temp of the liquid. I've had room temp jars that " pop" when filled with boiling liquid. It makes a mess! You should also sterilize the lids in boiling water while the syrup is cooking - not only to kill bacteria but to soften the rubber for a better seal.
Once cooled - remove the rings - they will rust.
 

joeswine

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my jars are all placed in the washer prier to use along with the lids and screw tops,if you notice when I'm filling the liquid into the jars there in a shallow pan,the i run cool water in the pan that helps create a vacuum ,tighten down with stove mittens ,all's well,done for the better part of 20 years... it's all part of the process.
 

wildhair

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Like I said - just a suggestion. Canning the syrup is a great idea - I'll definitely be using it. I've been following this thread - actually read it all from the beginning. Lots of great info - thanks for taking the time.
 

joeswine

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Thanks for reading I hope you have pickup some usfull info and keep sharing everyone's info is welcome.
What did you think was the most interested you.?
 

wildhair

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I just started making wine in fall of 2016, so a lot of it is a bit advanced for me at this stage, to be honest. I had no idea what an "f-pac" even was when i started reading the posts. I found the whole concept of adding different flavors at different times to get different flavor profiles fascinating - it takes things to a level that I was unaware even existed. I hadn't read anywhere previously about making flavor packs or adding zests. As I get a little more confident in my basic skills - I will be trying to make some f-pacs .......... maybe this summer. The pictures and directions make it look like something I could do.

I appreciate the time you take to post all this info and for everyone whose answered my Q's the last year.
 

joeswine

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Summer is a great time for making fpacs fruit is fresh for the now and the cold wintery months, sauteed down vacuum sealed ,rem remem always think outside the box.
 

joeswine

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FPAC ARE FUN TO USE AND CAN EVEN BE FROZEN FOR WHEN YOU WANT TO MAKE WINE IN THE WINTER MONTHS AND DON'T HAVE A FRESH FRUIT INSIGHT ,THESE ARE SOME F TH MANY TYPES YOU CAN MAKE .ALWAYS KEEP THE BASE WINES PROFILE IN MIND AN THE PARTNERSHIP WITH THE ADDED FLOAVOR..GOT IT?
 

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wildhair

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OK - this is sort of an fpac related Q. I have 5 gal of Rhubarb wine I just put in the secondary. Sg is at .990. As I mentioned above, I also do a lot of canning and I have some rhubarb sauce on the shelf. It is essentially cooked down rhubarb + some sugar. So it's "kinda" like and fpac - but canned instead of frozen.
To add more rhubarb flavor to the wine (as well as residual sugar) - can I put the rhubarb sauce in a mesh bag and add it to the secondary? Would that add more flavor or would it cause problems - like spoilage or off flavor or something?

I did add 2 1/2 qt. in a mesh bag during primary fermentation and it worked fine - added a bit more color and flavor to the brew. I also have some canned cherries and black raspberries in light syrup - I should be able to turn those into fpac's, too - right?
Have you ever tried canning the f-pacs instead of freezing them?
 

joeswine

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As far as the rubarb goes how thick is this? Sometimes less is more don't over add is your taste buds ( I wouldn't add more) you can at the back end if you wanted to.As far as the cherries and blackberries go as long as they were fresh no problem,you need to decide if you want to partnership or background the flavor profile.Your thinking outside the box and that's great.
 

wildhair

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The rhubarb sauce is about as thick as applesauce and about the same consistency. The cherries and black raspberries were picked, prepped and canned by me. Doesn't get any fresher.

And if I remember your earlier posts correctly - "partner" the flavor would be to add the fpac in the primary and "background" the flavor profile is to add it in the secondary.
I'll need to go back and re-read to brush up on this. :) I'll hold off on adding anymore rhubarb and see how it turns out.

Would it work better (to boost the flavor and aroma) to add the extra rhubarb (sauce) when the primary fermentation was ALMOST done - like at SG -1.030 or 1.020?
I think that's when I added the fpac in the kit wine I did.
 

joeswine

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I think I wouldn't add anymore to this mix see how it finishes out first .Stop adding . As far as the berries go what was your canning process any additives?
 

wildhair

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Agreed - no more additions to this batch. The only additives for any of my fruit is some light sugar syrup. Sometimes a bit of lemon juice - depending on the fruit. Berries and cherries - only light syrup.
That's the advantage to home canning - you can eliminate the additives.
 

joeswine

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When using a Fpac I always get a starting reading then add my simple syrup 1 quart at a time,usually 1 will do so be careful let your hudrohydro be your best friend.stay the course.and always think outside the box.jp
 

joeswine

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ARE YOU READY FOR THE FRUIT TASTE OF SUMMER THEN LETS GET MAKING FPACS TO SUIT YOUR TASTE AND YOUR WINES BASE,,,EASY FUN AND TASTY
 

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joeswine

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PHASE #2...........................
To make Simple Syrup
We use Pure Can Sugar Only.

Simple syrup is a 2 to 1 blend (2 parts sugar, 1 part water)
We use ball jars as a measuring device because that is what I store it in.

So, this batch was 4-to-2 blend. (4 ball jars sugar, 2 ball jars water)
which equates to 4 full ball jars of simple syrup ready to use anytime.

First:
Measure out sugar to water ratio.
Next, add sugar to a large metal pot.
Now is a good time to take the ball jars and place them in the sink in a tray and have your lids ready and your hot mittens (cooking gloves, whatever you call them!)
Make a well in the center, then dump the water into the well and stir until blended (not disolved yet.)
Next, turn the heat up to high. Stirring frequently until you see it start to clear a little with a light foam on top. Once you see this, you want to stir it constantly. It will go from simmer to rapid boil almost instantly when it's ready to go. Continue to stir, being careful to NOT GET ANY ON YOU! It will take your skin off, it's very HOT!
With a metal spoon you should see through the simple syrup just like water, it will be clear. You will know you are done when this happens. (It will be at a hard boil when this happens.)
You should already have your ball jars clean and ready to go. I place mine in a tin tray in the sink and fill the tray half way up w/ water. I place a wide mouth funnel inside the jars and take the boiling hot simple syrup and CAREFULLY fill the ball jars. Use your mitten and put the lids and rings on the jars and tighten them up. Turn the cold water on them and allow it to run in the tray. The process of the water cooling down the simple syrup will cause a vacuum in the jars and you will hear a "POP!". This will seal your ball jars and by the morning they will be cool and ready for you to handle. This simple syrup will stay good indefinetily.
This is how I make simple syrup. Another tool in the toolbox.
 

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joeswine

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Basic Wine Chemistry




Chaptalization is the process of adding sugar to unfermented grape developed by the French chemist Jean-Antoine-Claude Chaptal, for whom it was named. Contrary to popular belief, this process does not make the wine sweeter but only artificially inflates the alcohol content. Additionally, the sugar in chaptalized wine cannot be tasted.

Potassium Metabisulfite is a common wine or must additive, where it forms sulfur dioxide gas (SO2). This both prevents most wild microorganisms from growing, and it acts as potent antioxidant, protecting both the color, and delicate flavors of wine.

Typical dosage is ¼ tsp potassium metabisulfite, per 6 gallon bucket of must (yielding roughly 75ppm of SO2) prior to fermentation, and ½ tsp per 6 gallon bucket (150 ppm of SO2) at bottling.

Winemaking equipment is sanitized by spraying with a 1% SO2 (2 tsp potassium metabisulfite per L) solution.

Potassium Sorbate is used to inhibit molds, and yeasts in wine. Also known affectionately as “wine stabilizer”, potassium sorbate produces sorbic acid when added to wine. It serves two purposes. When active fermentation has ceased and the wine is racked for the final time after clearing, potassium sorbate will continue fermenting any residual sugar into CO2 and alcohol, but when they die no new yeast will be present to cause future fermentation. When a wine is sweetened before bottling, potassium sorbate is used to prevent refermentation when used in conjunction with potassium metabisulfite. It is primarily used with sweet wines, sparkling wines and some hard cider but may be added to table wines which exhibits difficulty in maintaining clarity after fining.
 

joeswine

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MAKING A FPAC ON YOUR OWN CAN BE FUN AND REWAREDING ,JUST THINK OUTSIDE THE BOX AND HAVE FUN WITH YOUR DRINK...
 

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