Help needed with choosing a variety: Prairie Star vs. E.S. 10-18-14

Wine Making Talk

Help Support Wine Making Talk:

Joined
Oct 9, 2020
Messages
17
Reaction score
7
Hello, I am trying to choose between those two varieties bred by Elemer Swenson. Never tasted a wine made from them. I would make a dry white wine. Both are said to be "neutral, full body, long finish". Problem is, that wine descriptions of those two varieties are similar. But maybe there are some differences? If someone is making a wine from any or both of them, i would ask for describing aroma and taste of the resulting wine. Of course- other aspects, like health, hardiness is also interesting. Which one You would reccomend?
 

VinesnBines

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 5, 2020
Messages
398
Reaction score
366
I don't have any experience with either though my research indicates that Prairie Star can have poor fruit set in some seasons. Also it is a neutral wine with good body and mouthfeel, good for blending with Louise Swenson.

I know nothing of ES 10-18-14 except is is one of the Swenson numbers.

How many vines are you planning to plant? If you have room, I suggest a few of each to evaluate. Are there other growers in your area that you can consult? I understand planting without tasting before hand but then every site is different so you will always be planting a new variety in YOUR vineyard without tasting the end result.
 

mgmarty

Shady Acres Winery
WMT Supporter
Joined
Apr 28, 2013
Messages
313
Reaction score
64
Location
Utah
I will let you know. I planted Prairie Star three years ago and will finally make wine with it this year. It is a different grape, not vigorous, in Utah’s heat anyway. They like top wire cordon training as well, they like to drape. I planted it to blend with my Seyval. I’ve drank wine made with Prairie Star from Minnesota. It’s got a wonderful nose!
 
Joined
Oct 9, 2020
Messages
17
Reaction score
7
I will let you know. I planted Prairie Star three years ago and will finally make wine with it this year. It is a different grape, not vigorous, in Utah’s heat anyway. They like top wire cordon training as well, they like to drape. I planted it to blend with my Seyval. I’ve drank wine made with Prairie Star from Minnesota. It’s got a wonderful nose!
Yes i found info that is good for blending. But for me it would be interesting to make varietal wine from it. "Wonderful nose"- wow- that's good news! But maybe it was blended with other variety?
 
Joined
Oct 9, 2020
Messages
17
Reaction score
7
I don't have any experience with either though my research indicates that Prairie Star can have poor fruit set in some seasons. Also it is a neutral wine with good body and mouthfeel, good for blending with Louise Swenson.

I know nothing of ES 10-18-14 except is is one of the Swenson numbers.

How many vines are you planning to plant? If you have room, I suggest a few of each to evaluate. Are there other growers in your area that you can consult? I understand planting without tasting before hand but then every site is different so you will always be planting a new variety in YOUR vineyard without tasting the end result.
I plan maybe 10 vines, approximately. I live in Lithuania. Swenson varieties are quite new here, so i try to find info in this forum- guess those varieties are already well known in USA :)
 

VillaVino

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2016
Messages
130
Reaction score
63
I’ve had Prairie Star for 11 years. You have your good years and not so good years. Fruit set is a problem. If the spring is not prefect, you will have problems with your clusters in the fall. The wine is very good. I liken it to a Riesling but that’s just me. Don’t know the other grape.
 
Joined
Oct 9, 2020
Messages
17
Reaction score
7
I’ve had Prairie Star for 11 years. You have your good years and not so good years. Fruit set is a problem. If the spring is not prefect, you will have problems with your clusters in the fall. The wine is very good. I liken it to a Riesling but that’s just me. Don’t know the other grape.
Thank you for reply. Yes, i have read about that poor fruit set problem in this variety. In one source, there was a possible explanation on why it is happening, and what should be done to prevent it:
Excessive shoot vigor prior to and during bloom. Very vigorously growing shoot tips divert carbohydrates from the flower cluster, starving it. Carbohydrates could be diverted to the flower by removing the tip plus 3 nodes from each shoot 3-4 days before bloom. Also, foliar nutrient sprays applied two times before bloom.
I can not check if this is correct, because i still don't have Prairie Star. If this method really helps, please let me know :)
 

VillaVino

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2016
Messages
130
Reaction score
63
I’ll have to run a test. I have PS in 2 sections of the vineyard. Thx
 

Latest posts

Top