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Extended kit instructions

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cpfan

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I have not tried these extended instructions. They do look fairly reasonable to me. I do make my kits on an 'informal' extended time table. This means that I follow the instructions but extend some of the time frames.

The following points caught my attention.

The modern kits that I know add the bentonite at the beginning not in the middle. I would add at the beginning.

All of the kits that I know recommend just sprinkling the yeast on the must in a primary. This is difficult if starting in a carboy. I will continue to start in a primary, and sprinkle the yeast.

I don't think stirring the yeast in primary is necessary. Stirring due to grape skins, other fruit, or oak...yeah...good idea, although I often forget.

Changing clarifying agents....I probably wouldn't, but to each their own.

Steve
 
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conboss

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I don't follow the instructions by the letter. I made Vinters Reserve Pinot Noir and Shiraz on Saturday. I added a cup of Light Dry Malt, boiled for 30 miniutes, into each of the musts. It adds body to the must and I top up with comerical wine when I rack. I let mine sit for 9 months in carboys, racking every 3 or 4 months. I also add biolees after 3 months it adds mouthfeel and some flavor to the wine. I am going to try Tancor tannin to each with some oak chips in the secondary.

Greg
 
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Davdef

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What is the purpose of starting in a primary fermenter versus a carboy? I thought it was to let some oxygen in during the primary phase but this "vino del vida" kit said that if you have a lid and an airlock to use it during primary, or just cover it...

Seems to me there is a big difference in the amount of oxygen involved between airlock and a cover.

That link to winemaker mag, says let the hydrometer be my guide. No problem, I can do that, but whats the point in racking after 6-10 days to a different vessle if there there will be no difference? is it just to get it off the lees after a week?

So should I take the air lock off and let it breath to start?
 

smurfe

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What is the purpose of starting in a primary fermenter versus a carboy? I thought it was to let some oxygen in during the primary phase but this "vino Del vida" kit said that if you have a lid and an airlock to use it during primary, or just cover it...

Seems to me there is a big difference in the amount of oxygen involved between airlock and a cover.

That link to winemaker mag, says let the hydrometer be my guide. No problem, I can do that, but whats the point in racking after 6-10 days to a different vessle if there there will be no difference? is it just to get it off the lees after a week?

So should I take the air lock off and let it breath to start?
I believe the reason it says place an airlock in the lid is to basically fill the hole in the lid of the primary so contaminants can not get in. You could throw a towel over the lid with the same results. You want the oxygen that is inside the container but you want to keep other stuff out like fruit flies.

There are a couple different reasons to rack out of the primary after 5-7 days or so, particularly when the SG reaches 1.010. First reason is the fermentation is not producing as much CO2 which blankets the must in the bucket and protects from oxygen. There is still CO2 present but not as high levels as the yeast are dying off. There is a chance oxygen can get to the wine. When you rack to the carboy, you still do not top up yet. There is still enough CO2 to blanket the wine as the surface area has been greatly reduced.

Second reason is if there is oak added to the kit you get the wine off of the oak. They normally use either chips or powder for oaking which extracts its flavor much faster than cubes. If you leave the wine in the primary for extended periods of time on oak, you could over oak the wine.

I follow the first few steps of the kit instructions very closely until I get the wine off of the gross lees. After that, I basically bulk age until I find time to bottle.

Smurfe :)
 

cpfan

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Another reason for a primary initially over a carboy is room for any foaming that occurs. I know these are low foaming yeasts but there is still some foam. Also with the larger surface area some of the CO2 will come out of solution.

The Vino del Vida instructions are trying to cover use of both styles of primary fermenters. If the air lock isn't mentioned, people ask about it. If the air lock is mentioned, people ask about it. Apparently if both are mentioned, people ask about it. Can't win.

Steve
 

dubulup

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Back from the dead!

I very much enjoy these extended instructions(big reds), however I do integrate into whatever kit I'm brewing at the time; as anothers have said. For the most part it seems mostly to rely on natural degassing and bulk aging.


These are my questions:



Why take a gallon of raw must, no oak treatment, and set aside for the primary fermenting to add later; day 7-9?
My guess...some what of a yeast nutrient? And maybe to smooth the oak treated must??


Why take 200ml out around day 30, stir in clarifier and add back after?
My guess...a little gassy wine to add to the blanket for clarifying.


I'd love to hear others thoughts on removing a portion of wine at certain times and adding back later.


I think the main reason I like these instructions is to remind me to slow down and not expect nice wine in 6 weeks...and I like tinkering.
 

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