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KCCam

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Back to residual glue. A really cheap and easy way is to mix equal parts of vegetable oil and baking soda. Mix it into a paste and apply it to the glue. Wait for it to dry, then wash off the paste and the glue. Hardly have to do any scrubbing at all. For 2-3 bottles, 1 TBSP of oil and baking soda is usually enough.
First time I’ve heard that one. I’ll have to try it. Naphtha is cheap, simpler, and much quicker, but it’s also toxic and flammable. Nothing I’ve tried come close to removing residue as completely and cleanly (it leaves no residue). Maybe this will.
 

Lukaswine

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Tried the oven, tried all the other methods. Some worked on some plenty didn't work on others. Residual glue is a pain and I'm not inclined to use harsh noxious chemicals. So, I quit using used commercial bottles and started buying new ones and using easy peel labels that I read about on another thread here and they are great. Buying bottles isn't too bad if they are easy to wash and peel. Plus they come with a box. Worth it to me anyway.
I haven’t tried the oven method yet and probably won’t. Like you I purchase new ones because it’s easier. I found a place in Olympia WA @ $12/case.
 

LeeInCS

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We soak in hot, soapy water for a couple of hours and peal. Residue is scraped with a razor then scrubbed with scrubby sponge (scrunge). No big deal
 

Ted Brumleve

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Floppy disks, I laugh at those. How about back when you had to know what switches to have up and which ones down to boot a Dec (Digital Equipment Company) PDP 11 computer?? and an 80 Mb disk platter was a big round thing with 8 or 10 read heads. Everything you wrote had to reside in 32K of address space or was it even less, it has been a long time since I thought about that.
PDP->VAX->Alpha Those were soooo much better than PCs for controls in a chemical plant. PCs just for the operator interface.
 

cmason1957

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PDP->VAX->Alpha Those were soooo much better than PCs for controls in a chemical plant. PCs just for the operator interface.
Yes sir, I worked putting robots onto thre shop floor and we used VT220 and thre color ones (I forget the number now) for the operator UI. And add I recall the number pdp 11-73 which wad a ship floor hardened version of PDP 11/70, this would have been 198x. Before Vax was every thought about and prior to that Perkin Elmer something or other to replace machine tool readers.
 

sour_grapes

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Ok, since we are going ancient here, how about making up punch cards to feed into a computer?
I also did that in college. I must admit, I never had to do it after college, so I guess that makes me young! 😇
 

Chuck E

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Ok, since we are going ancient here, how about making up punch cards to feed into a computer?
I did that at Bradley University in the '70s. If you had an error, they returned the deck to you with the error message. You had to troubleshoot the rest yourself. Near finals time, there would be lines outside to turn the decks for processing... at 3am!
 

cmason1957

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Ok, since we are going ancient here, how about making up punch cards to feed into a computer?
Did that at my first year of college, only undergraduate computer science class I took, Fortran IV, I believe on am IBM of some kind. And one other time, I can't remember what for, but I had to write a program in RPG, what a stupid language.
 

DizzyIzzy

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The hard disk drives were as big as clothes washing machines. Purple and orange switches... set them & enter, set them & enter, REPEAT...
To Val, KC and others commenting on the "good ole days" with early computers. I have you ALL beat...............I am old enough to remember when there was no such thing as a computer, nor cell phones for that matter. We had to search for a pay phone to call someone, and cashiers in super markets had cash registers, and they actually "counted out" your cash............noone counts today (have you noticed?) But, Val, I can relate to one thing you said. I, too, paid $2,600 for my first computer. It was a Gateway, and I am still using its keyboard because I am used to the feel of it, kinda like the old-fashioned typewriters. Any of you have memories of those?....................Like Archie Bunker: those were the days...........................................Dizzy
 

Venatorscribe

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To Val, KC and others commenting on the "good ole days" with early computers. I have you ALL beat...............I am old enough to remember when there was no such thing as a computer, nor cell phones for that matter. We had to search for a pay phone to call someone, and cashiers in super markets had cash registers, and they actually "counted out" your cash............noone counts today (have you noticed?) But, Val, I can relate to one thing you said. I, too, paid $2,600 for my first computer. It was a Gateway, and I am still using its keyboard because I am used to the feel of it, kinda like the old-fashioned typewriters. Any of you have memories of those?....................Like Archie Bunker: those were the days...........................................Dizzy
I remember in the late 70s my boss writing a business case to buy a fax machine. Also remember the constant chattering of a telex machine. Crickey - tech has moved a long way in such a short time
 

sour_grapes

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I am old enough to remember when there was no such thing as a computer,
The first computer was ENIAC, in 1945. (First electronic, general-purpose computer, that is.) I used to walk by it every day! (Of course, it hadn't been used since 1955, but there is kind of a "shrine" to it to this day.)
 

Jal5

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For some reason I cannot stand the smell of goo gone! Can’t use it on my Wine bottles. I stick to heatgun then will try the baking soda and oil on leftover glue.
 

Darrell Hawley

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To Val, KC and others commenting on the "good ole days" with early computers. I have you ALL beat...............I am old enough to remember when there was no such thing as a computer, nor cell phones for that matter. We had to search for a pay phone to call someone, and cashiers in super markets had cash registers, and they actually "counted out" your cash............noone counts today (have you noticed?) But, Val, I can relate to one thing you said. I, too, paid $2,600 for my first computer. It was a Gateway, and I am still using its keyboard because I am used to the feel of it, kinda like the old-fashioned typewriters. Any of you have memories of those?....................Like Archie Bunker: those were the days...........................................Dizzy
And paying $100 for 512K memory so I could get to 1 gig of memory. A real speed demon after that. :D
 

NoQuarter

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To Val, KC and others commenting on the "good ole days" with early computers. I have you ALL beat...............I am old enough to remember when there was no such thing as a computer, nor cell phones for that matter. We had to search for a pay phone to call someone, and cashiers in super markets had cash registers, and they actually "counted out" your cash............noone counts today (have you noticed?) But, Val, I can relate to one thing you said. I, too, paid $2,600 for my first computer. It was a Gateway, and I am still using its keyboard because I am used to the feel of it, kinda like the old-fashioned typewriters. Any of you have memories of those?....................Like Archie Bunker: those were the days...........................................Dizzy
All our cars and trucks had a C.B. and an 8 track player, we rarely had to search for the pay phones except to call our parents. We used to hang out at the soda shop in back of the Rx drug store after school, and back in the woods at the lake on weekends. F.M. radio was what changed our world., and maybe vietnam....
 

DizzyIzzy

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The first computer was ENIAC, in 1945. (First electronic, general-purpose computer, that is.) I used to walk by it every day! (Of course, it hadn't been used since 1955, but there is kind of a "shrine" to it to this day.)
I guess I should have been specific in stating that for "everyday, personal Use"
 

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