Beer to drink while waiting on wine to age?

Discussion in 'Beer Making' started by Intheswamp, Nov 9, 2019 at 4:07 PM.

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  1. Nov 9, 2019 at 4:07 PM #1

    Intheswamp

    Intheswamp

    Intheswamp

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    Ok, there's a thread going on in the beginner's winemaking subforum... "Drinkable wines while waiting for others to finish aging". But, I like beer, too, but have never brewed any. I'm thinking of brewing beer to help "span the ages". I'm a wimp and normally drink Coors Lite.:h And, I figure the best route is to go with a kit...but which one?

    What would be the most simple process to use? Anybody got a link to a cookie-cutter, generic, beginner's beer-making tutorial for the criminally mundane?

    When I start reading about malting, and mashing, and 5-row, and other aspects of homebrewing my eyes start crossing...

    So, any *really* basic pointers on where to start at?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Nov 9, 2019 at 5:54 PM #2

    bshef

    bshef

    bshef

    Highland Meadow Vineyard

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    Stay off the beer forum; people really get serious. Any pale ale kit will work for the rank beginner who drinks lite lager. Get one from Austin Homebrew. They have a mess of clones. Remember only sanitize with Star San, no Kmeta. O2 is more harmful to beer than wine. Keep it really clean and stable temps. Ales ferment at room temp but the beer will suffer if too close to heat or AC vents. I brew beer and make wine. Beer takes more time on the front end but drinkable in a month or 2.
     
  3. Nov 9, 2019 at 5:55 PM #3

    bshef

    bshef

    bshef

    Highland Meadow Vineyard

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    Also try hard cider; best of both worlds.
     
  4. Nov 9, 2019 at 6:47 PM #4

    jsbeckton

    jsbeckton

    jsbeckton

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    ‘How to Brew’ by John Palmer is the Bible of homebrewing. It’s a big read but excellent info.

    Brewing is similar to wine making in that most people start with kits and move up after they get the hang of it (all grain/all grape). The beer kits will give you pretty much everything you need but again similar to wine many people swap out the yeast.

    If you are into watery lagers (sorry ) you might want to try making a Kolsch as lagers require more time and temp control than most ales.

    Craigslist is your friend for equipment.
     
  5. Nov 10, 2019 at 6:11 PM #5

    BernardSmith

    BernardSmith

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    Here's the thing - if you plan on making a beer using all-grain and your plan is to make 5 gallons then you need to plan to make this outdoors and use a propane heater. Typically, a kitchen range is not powerful enough to bring that amount of mash or wort to the kinds of temperatures you want in a time frame that you can tolerate. If you have no access to a propane heater then either plan on making smaller volumes (say 1-3 gallons) or think about using DME or LME (dried malt extract or liquid malt extract.
    There are a number of books that focus on recipes for gallon batches and you simply increase the amount of malt and hops.
     
  6. Nov 10, 2019 at 6:49 PM #6

    bshef

    bshef

    bshef

    Highland Meadow Vineyard

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    PM me for some good extract/mini mash recipes/tips.
     

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