Accidentally put stabilizer(E223,E202) instead of wine yeast into 33L fermenting bucket and I'm wondering is there anyway to save the wine?

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espengler84

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So I bought a wine making kit(33 liters fermenting buckets etc) with the Solomon Grundy Classic Red Wine 22L kit.

I prepared everything last night (sanitized everything, made sure I was following the instructions closely) and I thought I had done everything right but I discovered just now that instead of putting wine yeast and wine nutrient into the bucket I accidentally put the stablizer with the nutrient. I'm very angry at myself because I was quite consciousness with the other instructions.


I put the packet of yeast into the bucket just now (after the stabilizer had been put into the bucket since last night with the electric heating pad underneath it) hoping that possibly the yeast might still work? I've had a look on Google and some other people have made the same mistake as I and it seems a possible solution could be to buy yeast packets from the supermarket and add it to apple juice until it ferments and then add it to the wine?

However I just thought I'd ask on this forum before I do anything. Any helpful advice would be very much appreciated! Thanks
 
So I bought a wine making kit(33 liters fermenting buckets etc) with the Solomon Grundy Classic Red Wine 22L kit.

I prepared everything last night (sanitized everything, made sure I was following the instructions closely) and I thought I had done everything right but I discovered just now that instead of putting wine yeast and wine nutrient into the bucket I accidentally put the stablizer with the nutrient. I'm very angry at myself because I was quite consciousness with the other instructions.


I put the packet of yeast into the bucket just now (after the stabilizer had been put into the bucket since last night with the electric heating pad underneath it) hoping that possibly the yeast might still work? I've had a look on Google and some other people have made the same mistake as I and it seems a possible solution could be to buy yeast packets from the supermarket and add it to apple juice until it ferments and then add it to the wine?

However I just thought I'd ask on this forum before I do anything. Any helpful advice would be very much appreciated! Thanks

Wow. Well we’re here to help, if we can. The stabilizer is probably potassium sorbate, which prevents the yeast from multiplying. So we have to get past that hurdle. Supermarket yeast, I’m assuming is bread yeast, at least in the US. That won’t work. You need a wine yeast. The best yeast for getting through difficult conditions is EC1118. I would make a starter yeast solution of table sugar, nutrients, and the EC1118. Let that brew for 12 or so hours.

Then get another 33L bucket and put a liter or two of your wine in that bucket and add your yeast starter, every couple of hours add another 2 liters of your wine. Judge whether the new must is going, by looking for foam, or fizziness, anything to indicate active fermentation. You may need to get several packets of EC1118 to get you through. Good luck, nothing is ruined yet, but it may take some time to get to success.
 
Wow. Well we’re here to help, if we can. The stabilizer is probably potassium sorbate, which prevents the yeast from multiplying. So we have to get past that hurdle. Supermarket yeast, I’m assuming is bread yeast, at least in the US. That won’t work. You need a wine yeast. The best yeast for getting through difficult conditions is EC1118. I would make a starter yeast solution of table sugar, nutrients, and the EC1118. Let that brew for 12 or so hours.

Then get another 33L bucket and put a liter or two of your wine in that bucket and add your yeast starter, every couple of hours add another 2 liters of your wine. Judge whether the new must is going, by looking for foam, or fizziness, anything to indicate active fermentation. You may need to get several packets of EC1118 to get you through. Good luck, nothing is ruined yet, but it may take some time to get to success.
Thanks so much for the very helpful reply.

I've just got to say firstly before addressing your helpful answer that since this morning about 10 hours ago when I actually put in the wine yeast into the bucket the airlock has been making bubbling noises and just now it actually forced the yellow cap that was lightly resting on top off the airlock completely. Also there's a slight bump on the lip of the bucket itself indicating pressure from within.

I'm wondering if this is a good sign that CO2 is being created and the yeast is eating the sugar or could there be another reason for this? I assume it's a good sign?
 
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Also there's a slight bump on the lip of the bucket itself indicating pressure from within.

I doubt if the bump means anything. The bucket is not pressurized. Pressure is being relieved through the airlock. Pressing on the bump to force bubbles also means nothing, except your lid is sealed to the bucket. I guess that by itself is a good thing. If you’re seeing bubbles without out any touching then I would say you are fermenting. Keep an eye on the SG as this will tell you if the yeast are propagating, or if they have succumbed to the sorbate and have stopped multiplying.
 
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I doubt if the bump means anything. The bucket is not pressurized. Pressure is being relieved through the airlock. Pressing on the bump to force bubbles also means nothing, except your lid is sealed to the bucket. I guess that by itself is a good thing. If you’re seeing bubbles without out any touching then I would say you are fermenting. Keep an eye on the SG as this will tell you if the yeast are propagating, or if they have succumbed to the sorbate and have stopped multiplying.
So I found out the stabiliser I accidentally added contains "Sodium metabisulfite" and "Potassium sorbate". Interestingly this sachet was not the only thing I was meant to add at the very end that contains "sulphites".

The airlock has been steadily making noises since yesterday when I added the yeast. So I assume fermentation is occurring. I'm just worried even though it seems to be fermenting will the sorbate inhibit the amount it should be fermenting. In other words will I end up with wine that has a low alcohol content?

If I take a gravity reading a few days from now can I put the wine I took out in order to conduct the reading back into the bucket or would that be unsafe? I don't want to waste wine.
 
The stabilizer should contain potassium metabisulfite and sorbate. They work well together and it is recommended.

Metabisulfite by itself will kill most bacteria, but most good quality wine yeasts won’t be affected. Especially if you make a yeast starter ahead of time, to greatly increase the size of the yeast colony. Since the ferment is really just beginning I would get rid of the airlock and leave the lid on loose. The yeast need oxygen now. If you have a refractometer, it just requires a drop to get a Brix reading. As long as you sanitize the hydrometer and tube, you can return the sample to the wine.

If the yeast colony dies out because it cannot reproduce, then your wine will be low in alcohol and very sweet. This leaves the wine vulnerable to infection. That is why I’m recommending adding additional yeast via a yeast starter and blasting that must with viable yeast.

Just a note on using a refractometer, the readings get skewed the more that alcohol is in the wine. In the early stages of fermentation it’s very quick to use, so a useful tool if you have one.
 
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