The Definitive* Jaboticaba Wine Thread

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Stressbaby

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I've been collecting this fruit for several years, and today I'm starting the wine.

Because this is the Definitive* Jaboticaba Wine Thread, some background is in order. Jaboticaba is a tropical fruit from Brazil. The latin is Plinia cauliflora; it is sometimes known as Brazilian Grape or Jabuticaba but often is just shortened to "jabo." It is unique in that it flowers and fruits directly on the trunk, creating some spectacular displays.

250px-Plinia_cauliflora.jpg

Jabo wine is commercially available, mainly in Australia. It's also used for ports and liqueurs. I've never tried any.

*said with tongue firmly in cheek
 

Stressbaby

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There are some interesting Youtube videos on jaboticaba wine. This is my favorite:
 

Stressbaby

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Stressbaby

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Jaboticaba fruit is roughly the size of a grape, and the skin imparts a dark red color. But the skin is much thicker than a grape. When eaten, the taste is not unlike a grape, but to me, the skins have some bitterness if chewed. This will impact our winemaking approach. The main acid is citric. Tannins are considered to be high.

I secured my trees in 2007 and 2010. This is a tropical tree, and I live in Missouri. So they are containerized, relatively small, and relatively small producers. My trees stay in a greenhouse all winter and come outside in summer. I've been saving fruits for a long time - years in fact - all of the production goes in the deep freezer. So obviously I'm doing things differently than someone in a tropical climate with plenty of fruit. The *Definitive tag is just my attempt at a little temperate zone humor.

image2.JPG image1.JPG
 
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sour_grapes

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That is some dedication there! Very interesting.
 

Stressbaby

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I have 3.813kg (8.4#) of fruit. I've decided to make a 1 gallon batch. I don't know how much juice I'll get (and therefore how much volume loss with removal of skins/seeds). I'll assume 50% since I'm pulling the skins earlier than I would with grapes. This means the final wine will be about 50% straight jabo juice, 50% water, 8# fruit/gallon.

The general plan is:
Crush, measure the volume, then put the fruit into nylon mesh bag.
Assume 50% of the fruit volume will contribute to the final volume, then water to bring total to just over 1g (some for topping).
Sugar to ~1.075
2x KMS as with a red to account for binding, then later a hefty dose of pectic + Lallzyme EX; Opti Red and Booster Rouge, usual doses; let that work for 24hrs. No tannin additions.
Take measurements - make final adjustments in sugar to 1.090. Make final adjustments in acid with tartaric, aiming for TA 0.6-0.7, pH ~3.5.
Pitch yeast (I'm undecided on yeast right now) with GoFerm; Fermaid K for nutrients, stepfed.
Twice a day submerge the bag and stir.
Pull the bag and gently press off the skins at 72hr to try to avoid the astringent, bitter flavor of the skins.
Rack around 1.010, then usual care thereafter.

Pics and a day 1 post forthcoming.

Edited recipe from 1.5g to 1g: I didn't come this far to make thin wine.
 
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Rice_Guy

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it would be interesting to hear what the chemistry is with this fruit:
pH, gravity, TA, percent moisture, tannin, . . . flavor
my observation is that fruit wines basically follow the same chemistry as grape wines
Because this is the Definitive* Jaboticaba Wine Thread, some background is in order. Jaboticaba is a tropical fruit from Brazil. The latin is Plinia cauliflora; it is sometimes known as Brazilian Grape or Jabuticaba but often is just shortened to "jabo."
sounds like a fun thread, ,
 
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Johnd

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If the skins are as thick and high in tannin content as you suspect, have you considered just using pectic enzyme and skipping the Lallzyme EX-V? It may pull way too much out of the skins. You should get plenty tannins without it to bind your colors. The early pulling and gentle press of skins sounds like the right call given the above. Cool project, hope it comes out great!!
 

Stressbaby

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If the skins are as thick and high in tannin content as you suspect, have you considered just using pectic enzyme and skipping the Lallzyme EX-V? It may pull way too much out of the skins. You should get plenty tannins without it to bind your colors. The early pulling and gentle press of skins sounds like the right call given the above. Cool project, hope it comes out great!!
Interesting thought, John. Unfortunately I did not consider that, as I seem to chronically have trouble with color extraction with all types of reds. Using Lallzyme EX has, I'm afraid, kind of become a habit. Right now it doesn't look like much risk, as the must is just a light rosé color.

Too late now, but now you have me concerned, so I'll sample it as we go along and pull the skins earlier than 72hr if I start to pick up any bitterness.
 

Stressbaby

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IMG_2608.jpg
Here is my thawed fruit. Crushing jabo is not like crushing grapes. The skin is thick and each berry makes an audible "pop." It's more like popping bubble wrap. Here is what the "crushed" fruit looks like in the bag.

IMG_2609.jpg
These fruit haven't initially given up nearly as much juice as I thought. Here they are crushed in the bucket, and then with the bucket tilted over about 60 degrees.

IMG_2610.jpg IMG_2611.jpg
Many of the berries have split, but remain intact. This photo shows three examples of that near the back of the spoon.

IMG_2612.jpg
 

Stressbaby

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The numbers...

I added 2.2l water.
Then 3ml KMS 10%.
The initial numbers:
  • pH 3.20
  • TA 0.83%
  • SG 1.030
So much for acid additions.

I added 465g sugar to get SG to 1.070 predicted, but we'll remeasure in the morning and see how much more sugar has been extracted from the berries. Other additions: 1t pectic, 0.1g Lallzyme EX, 1g Booster Rouge, 1g Opti Red.
 

Rice_Guy

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The video from post 2 shows drawing out liquid with sugar. Was wondering how much juice there was vs is the juice bound in mucilage or gum, , , whatever the chemical it is freeze/ ice crystal stable.
Many of the berries have split, but remain intact.
 

Scooter68

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Curious... What about using a slow juicer like an Omega with the auger to press out the juice? You could still add the skins back in if desired but if the pulp is reluctant to give up it's juice the slow juicer might do that for you.
 

Stressbaby

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Curious... What about using a slow juicer like an Omega with the auger to press out the juice? You could still add the skins back in if desired but if the pulp is reluctant to give up it's juice the slow juicer might do that for you.
Not really familiar with that device, Scooter. I wonder if it wouldn't chew up the seeds leading to bitterness. But I don't know.
 

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Morning update.
SG 1.076
pH 3.04
TA 0.97%

I was aiming for more of a dry red style. You can already appreciate some sticky tannins. No bitterness. Thinking of ~7g calcium carbonate to bring those pH/TA numbers more in line with that style, that would be TA of 0.70%. Input welcome. Have not pitched the yeast yet, input welcome there too, I've got a little of everything.

IMG_2614.jpg
IMG_2613.jpg
 

Scooter68

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Juicer Auger.jpg Here's the auger part of the juicer. The process might crush the seeds depends on how big and tough they are. You have some control on how fine it will press the fruit. It turns fairly slow at 80 rpm which is pretty slow. Obviously no blades to slice anything. Just a wild thought to mention this. I core apples and run them through and peaches as well (After pitting) the pulp/skins comes out like moist cardboard when set tight.
 

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Update:
Used RC 212.
Day 3, pulled the skins and gently pressed. The wine is fairly tannic, and there might be just a bit of bitterness for the first time, so it's a good thing the skins are off.
I have just over a gallon volume.

Here is the must before yeast, and now:
IMG_2614.jpg IMG_2617.jpg

Lots of "slip skins" which leave these skinless berries:
IMG_2615.jpg

The wine:
IMG_2618.jpg
 
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Stressbaby

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1.024. This ferment is taking its time. I started a passion fruit wine the same day, and in the cold basement that wine is at 1.000 today. The jaboticaba wine is in anice warm pantry at probably 75F and it is still lagging. Still fermenting, just taking its time.
 

Stressbaby

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Update:
The jaboticaba wine even before it finished fermenting took on a disappointing brick-brown color. The picture below is the color at 1.010 when I racked to carboy. It looks oxidized, which is weird, because I treated with sulfite prior to pitching the yeast. Smells a lot like cherries. Volume-wise a little short of a gallon.

IMG_2623.jpg
 
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