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Imidacloprid vs Acetamiprid Insecticides (Neonicotinoids)

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we5inelgr

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Some information, and differences on two Neonicotinoids, used to treat grapes for sucking insects, some chewing insects and soil insects.

Neonicotinoids are a relatively new class of insecticides that share a common mode of action that affect the central nervous system of insects...They include imidacloprid, acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, nithiazine, thiacloprid and thiamethoxam.

1. Imidacloprid
Used in agriculture as foliar and seed treatments, for indoor and outdoor insect control, home gardening and pet products, imidacloprid is the most popular neonicotinoid, first registered in 1994 under the trade names Merit®, Admire®, AdvantageTM. It is moderately toxic and is linked to neurotoxic, reproductive and mutagenic effects. It has been found to be highly toxic to bees and other beneficial insects. It is also toxic to upland game birds, is generally persistent in soils and can leach to groundwater.

3. Acetamiprid
Acetamiprid has population-level effects on honeybees even though it has low acute toxicity. Certain neonicotinoids interfere with honeybee reproduction, ability to navigate, or temperature regulation, any of which can have an effect on long-term survival of honeybee colonies.
http://www.beyondpesticides.org/programs/bee-protective-pollinators-and-pesticides/chemicals-implicated


Another factor is half life in the soil. Acetamiprid is 1 - 8 days and Imidacloprid is 40 - 997 days.

http://ento.psu.edu/publications/are-neonicotinoids-killing-bees


And:

http://webdoc.agsci.colostate.edu/bspm/Garden Center Talk July 2014.pdf


Some additional articles:
Insecticides used in greenhouse and landscapes and toxicity to pollinators

Study Finds Glyphosate and Acetamiprid to Have Relatively Low Toxicity for Honey Bees


Of note: There appears to be an effort underway to get certain neonicotinoid products banned. In CA alone (2012):
The resolution urges “the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the California Department of Pesticide Regulation to act expeditiously to protect pollinators, especially honeybees, by prohibiting the use, marketing, or sale of neonicotinoid products deemed hazardous to pollinators.”The resolution specifically lists neonicotinoid products containing imidacloprid, clothianidin, and thiamethoxam, as being highly toxic to honey bees.

...

Alternatives Limited for Now
Pesticides other than imidacloprid have been used for GWSS control, however, some of the most effective alternatives are also neonicotinoids.
https://www.winesandvines.com/news/article/100138/Winegrape-Pesticide-Facing-Greater-Scrutiny


It appears that Acetamiprid might be a viable alternative, with less lethality to bee colonies and a shorter half life in the soil, to the widely used and effective Imidacloprid. Some potential options currently labeled for use with grapes:

Assail (30 & 70% available)

Ortho® Flower, Fruit & Vegetable Insect Killer Concentrate (0.5% available)
 

BlueStimulator

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Good stuff and thank you for sharing, it takes 5 half lives to completely clear a drug in the human body so that is very important data to consider when using insecticides.
 

Johny99

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Really good info. As one battling leaf hoppers that does make one think. I hit them with Naeem oil this year and it really helped.
 

we5inelgr

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Wow!!

Our little 26 vine vineyard was severely infested with leaf hoppers. A few weeks ago, I started to apply some Insect Killing Soap (as I had some on hand already), which lists Leafhoppers as one of the soft bodied pests it kills. After 2 applications as directed, it had absolutely no affect on their populations.
Earlier in the season, I had tried using the 'soap' as well as several applications of ladybugs and green lacewings. All had zero noticeable affect.

When I walked past the vines, the leaf hoppers would temporarily take to the air and create a very noticeable and tangible 'cloud' of insects.

Finally fed up with the damage, I looked for something more effective and after doing some research, ordered some Ortho Flower, Fruit & Vegetable Insect Killer Concentrate (which contains the safer, to bees, Acetamiprid), applied once as directed and waited.

5 days later, there was absolutely no trace of leaf hoppers. It appears that the 1 foliar application of Acetamiprid completely wiped out the leaf hoppers.

I now know how to knock their population down once I see them in the vineyard next year. I don't think they will be damaging my vines anymore. :b
 
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