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Wine Making & Grape Growing Forum > Wine Making > General Wine Making Forum > Total SO2 and sensory limit

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Old 01-27-2017, 10:27 AM   #11
havlikn
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I understand the fact that so2 drops over time. My question is if you keep adding and adding so2 every month to maintain the proper level, does it have adverse effects on the wine. Meaning if I add 5 grams a month for 24 months and this keeps my level at 45 ppm, is there any adverse effects

 
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Old 01-27-2017, 10:38 AM   #12
TonyR
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There are some people that can taste SO2 in wine. My palette isn't that refined but have had people ask what is that chemical taste.
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Old 01-27-2017, 11:26 AM   #13
grant675
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I suppose a good question is how do commercial wineries bulk age their wines in barrels or carboys for years, while keeping under the legal SO2 limit, or even the sensory limit, which could be as low as maybe 1/3 the legal limit (100PPM)? There's no way they can be opening up the barrels or carboys every 1 - 3 months and adding sulfites each time. I get that SO2 also helps prevent bacteria infestation, but if you're not opening the barrel or carboy, is there really much risk there? I think the bigger risk to oxidizing and infestation is when the winemaker keeps opening up the aging vessel! Why not just let it be and bring the sulfite level back up prior to the next transfer or bottling? I did read one interesting article that stated some wineries blow inert gas through the equipment (tubes, pumps, etc), and to fill headspace with the gas before closing up the vessel. Maybe that would really help to minimize alcohol to acetaldehyde transformation, which is stealing your free SO2. Maybe then you can open the vessel more often for tasting if the oxygen is removed prior to closing it back up. This is really nothing new I suppose, and there's no hard set rules. I just struggle with the idea that persistent sulfiting is a good replacement for process. It sort of becomes a crutch, but eventually the total SO2 level will be doing more harm than good.


 
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Old 01-27-2017, 11:31 AM   #14
grant675
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyR View Post
There are some people that can taste SO2 in wine. My palette isn't that refined but have had people ask what is that chemical taste.

I taste it, but have no idea at what PPM level. I think just about every fruit wine I've bought from a local commercial winery has over sulfited to the point that its noticeable. These are typically sweet winces since the sugar will bring back the base fruit flavor and help sell it as a fruit wine. Once SO2 is noticeable it's difficult to get past it when drinking, and I've dumped bottles before. That's exactly what I aim to prevent in my own fruit wines. I'm not one to beat the organic wine drum, but I think over sulfiting (total SO2) will ruin what was an otherwise great wine.


 
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Old 01-28-2017, 10:55 AM   #15
NorCal
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Taste, test, top is a standard winery cellar maintenance process. It would be nice to set it and forget it, come back a year later and have nicely aged wine, but that isn't the practice in any of the commercial wineries that I know.

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Old 01-31-2017, 04:29 PM   #16
baron4406
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Could you sterile filter your wine to get rid of the sulfates? Asking because there was a blurb on Facebook a while back about this funnel you'd pour your wine thru and it would remove sulfates(and thus no headache the day after). My wife really won't drink commercial wines anymore, they all give me a massive headache the next day

 
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Old 01-31-2017, 10:20 PM   #17
cmason1957
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Does your wife have reactions to raisins, dried apricots, other dried fruits? All of this have significantly more sulfites than wine. Generally sulfite reactions are respiratory, not headaches.

 
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Old 02-01-2017, 03:42 PM   #18
baron4406
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Not really cmason, then again she doesn't eat alot of dried fruits

 
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Old 02-02-2017, 08:12 AM   #19
Sudz
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There is a new product out there called "the Wand". It's a odd looking spoon which is used to eliminate sulfites in a glass of wine.

Have any of you tried one of these?

If so, can you describe the effect?

 
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