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Your Next Glass of Wine Might Be a Fake—and You'll Love It

Wine Making Talk

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Venatorscribe

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JohnT

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Why actually go and see the Mona Lisa when you could just dial up the image on your computer?

Sorry, but I see this as circumventing the trade and craft of winemaking.
 

Ajmassa

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Why actually go and see the Mona Lisa when you could just dial up the image on your computer?

Sorry, but I see this as circumventing the trade and craft of winemaking.
Its like my knock-off Ray Bans. They’re the good knock-offs tho. So good that you’re asked “are you a cop?” when purchasing.
They look identical to the real thing. Even when holding a real and a fake in each hand it’s so difficult to distinguish. When I’m wearing them nobody else knows they’re $15 knock-offs——but I still know. And no matter how perfect of a match......I would still prefer the real thing.

Very cool article ibglowin, thanks for posting it.
 

Johnd

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Perhaps it would be a good opportunity to taste a wine that's "just as good" as the real thing, without having to spend the money. I'd pay a little flash to drink a bottle of the nearly perfect knockoff of the 100 point 2010 Screaming Eagle ($4,000) or the 1982 Mouton-Rothschild ($2,000). Granted, it's not the same, but I'd sure love to know what it tastes like without spending some serious jack....................
 

balatonwine

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One can lab grow flawless emeralds, rubies and diamonds. So with enough lab work, lab made wine I would not find unexpected.

Which makes it all rather ironic. Such innovating technologies are simply duplicating an already massed produced wine, and thus further reducing total market wine diversity (i.e. yearly varietals, varieties, and all those little idiosyncrasies that make each bottle of wine so unique and wonderful), and ergo reducing wine making innovation. Again -- always ironic when tech, which always talks about the "innovations" in their methods, really ends up doing the opposite elsewhere in the industry and to the product.

But, there are enough niches in the wine consumer pool to satisfy both only those that want consistency and don't care if the wine was made in vat, and those that want something of a more traditional source. To each their own.
 
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