Yet another K-meta question

Winemaking Talk - Winemaking Forum

Help Support Winemaking Talk - Winemaking Forum:

BigDaveK

Supporting Members
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2022
Messages
1,081
Reaction score
1,868
Location
Hocking Hills, OH
First, as a canner and fermenter I can certainly appreciate sanitation and sterilization. I've fortunately had very few fails over the years but also fortunately failure is a GREAT teacher.
Now, I started the wine making adventure just a couple months ago. To keep it fun and simple at first I just wanted to follow a recipe and go by the book. That book, mostly, was Mary's Recipes. It doesn't mention k-meta at every, every other, or whatever racking. Stabilizing if backsweetening seems to be the only later chemical addition.
My question, out of curiosity and as a learning tool, does anyone have a horror story that they can attribute to NOT adding k-meta?
 
Joined
Nov 5, 2006
Messages
5,544
Reaction score
14,132
Location
Raleigh, NC, USA
I have a couple of stories, but they are not proof positive.

Twice I purchased wines from "organic" wineries that didn't use sulfite. Each wine was opened 6-9 months after purchase, and both were badly in decline and exhibiting oxidation.

Early in my winemaking career, I tried going light on sulfite, and in each case the wines declined faster than I expected.

There is no definite proof that low/no sulfite is the cause in the above situations. However, based upon my understanding of how sulfite works in wine, I believe it to be the cause.

When was your book written?
 
Last edited:

BigDaveK

Supporting Members
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2022
Messages
1,081
Reaction score
1,868
Location
Hocking Hills, OH
I have a couple of stories, but they are not proof positive.

Twice I purchased wines from "organic" wineries that didn't use sulfite. Each wine was opened 6-9 months after purchase, and both were badly in decline and exhibiting oxidation.

Early in my winemaking career, I tried going light on sulfite, and in each case the wines declined fast dinner than I expected.

There is no definite proof that low/no sulfite is the cause in the above situations. However, based upon my understanding of how sulfite works in wine, I believe it to be the cause.

When was your book written?

Book was copyrighted 2000. Probably about 95% recipes. I think it's a great little book for beginners (me!) because it's simple, not intimidating, and right away I thought "I can do this!" I have a couple other books I bought at book sales (for less than a buck each) that seem to be half wine making and half chemistry. If those were the only ones I was exposed to I never would have tried. Maybe I'll revisit them after I have a couple years experience under my belt.

Thank you for your stories!!!!
 

salcoco

Veteran Wine Maker
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2007
Messages
3,163
Reaction score
1,570
Location
Kansas
at a dosage of 1/4 tsp for 5 gallons this is only 50ppm a fair cry from the commercial standard of 250ppm. certainly not a cause for alarm considering the risk of not using k-meta. not only is it a oxygen scavenger but also a bacterial inhibiter.
 

Rice_Guy

Supporting Members
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2014
Messages
2,834
Reaction score
3,666
Location
Food Industry - - Retired
As a produce canner you know that pH is the main protectant in water bath canning. This is also the case in wine, the food poisoning risk is basically zero below pH 4.
Not a horror, but my quality went up/ shelf life improved when I started to assume free SO2 was at zero and add 50ppm every time I moved a wine. Prior to that I had acetaldehyde flavor issues. If you are doing red grape there are enough phenolics that they last better. White grape and country wines are at risk of off flavors unless you start adding something to bind oxygen. , , , I ignore the add every three months guidance, I never open a carboy just to add oxygen and meta to fight oxygen.
My question, out of curiosity and as a learning tool, does anyone have a horror story that they can attribute to NOT adding k-meta?
 

Mike Parisi

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2019
Messages
183
Reaction score
111
Not wanting to start a new thread, but have a question:

I have had my Mosti Mondiale Nero D'Avola kit (6 gallons) clearing for just over a month. I will rack into another carboy in a few days, and bottle about a week after that. Per the instructions, I added K-meta after degassing, along with keiselsol, chitosan, and sorbate. I know folks her say to add K-meta every 3 months (if carboy aging) and at bottling. So, my question is -- should I add K-meta (and how much) when I rack, or just before bottling, or skip it?
 
Joined
Aug 10, 2020
Messages
31
Reaction score
56
Location
Contra Costa County
To chime in on the thread, I think a lot of beginners are taught that SO2 is to keep out the bugs, but it is also important to stress the impact of keeping wine from oxidizing (as also mentioned).
if you have ever opened an older bottle of wine and tasted oxidization, you know it. Oxidization naturally occurs as phenols and anthocyanins break down and bind with oxygen. SO2 will slow down this process. It does NOT cause headaches unless you have an allergy to it. If you like dried fruit or raisons, you are consuming much more SO2 than what is in a bottle of wine.
 

BigDaveK

Supporting Members
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2022
Messages
1,081
Reaction score
1,868
Location
Hocking Hills, OH
As a produce canner you know that pH is the main protectant in water bath canning. This is also the case in wine, the food poisoning risk is basically zero below pH 4.
Not a horror, but my quality went up/ shelf life improved when I started to assume free SO2 was at zero and add 50ppm every time I moved a wine. Prior to that I had acetaldehyde flavor issues. If you are doing red grape there are enough phenolics that they last better. White grape and country wines are at risk of off flavors unless you start adding something to bind oxygen. , , , I ignore the add every three months guidance, I never open a carboy just to add oxygen and meta to fight oxygen.

Thanks so much! Shelf life is important to me. Part of me can get thirsty and doesn't think shelf life will be an issue. (!!!) Another part wants to taste the changes a year or so out. Just starting, much to learn. Thanks again!!
 
Top