Winery temps during MLF

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I use a small, cramped space as my winery. With spring in full swing, I am expecting malo to start soon. My concern is my ~200 gallons of sparkling base wine. Should I be concerned with the increased temperature from the MLF? I have an air conditioning system which I will use when it is time, but also want to encourage the malo so I periodically leave the winery doors open when it is warmer outside. So far it hasn't gotten hot enough outside to worry about it. I have nowhere else to put the sparkling base.

If instead of just waiting for malo to start on its own I inoculate, do you think I could mitigate the need of higher temps? Doesn't the process itself result in higher temps naturally? Is the time it takes to go through malo not long enough for it to be a threat to the sparkling? If I could afford to just bottle now, I would but I can't.
 
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I use a small, cramped space as my winery. With spring in full swing, I am expecting malo to start soon. My concern is my ~200 gallons of sparkling base wine. Should I be concerned with the increased temperature from the MLF? I have an air conditioning system which I will use when it is time, but also want to encourage the malo so I periodically leave the winery doors open when it is warmer outside. So far it hasn't gotten hot enough outside to worry about it. I have nowhere else to put the sparkling base.

If instead of just waiting for malo to start on its own I inoculate, do you think I could mitigate the need of higher temps? Doesn't the process itself result in higher temps naturally? Is the time it takes to go through malo not long enough for it to be a threat to the sparkling? If I could afford to just bottle now, I would but I can't.
What temperature range are you talking about? I think anything above 70*F should be fine (I wouldn't have it hang out at 85*F, oxidation happens quicker at higher temps). I have never tried a "natural" MLF, want to inoculate and get 'er done so I can protect the wine with Kmeta as soon as I can. If it was my wine I'd inoculate it.
 

Johnd

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I use a small, cramped space as my winery. With spring in full swing, I am expecting malo to start soon. My concern is my ~200 gallons of sparkling base wine. Should I be concerned with the increased temperature from the MLF? I have an air conditioning system which I will use when it is time, but also want to encourage the malo so I periodically leave the winery doors open when it is warmer outside. So far it hasn't gotten hot enough outside to worry about it. I have nowhere else to put the sparkling base.

If instead of just waiting for malo to start on its own I inoculate, do you think I could mitigate the need of higher temps? Doesn't the process itself result in higher temps naturally? Is the time it takes to go through malo not long enough for it to be a threat to the sparkling? If I could afford to just bottle now, I would but I can't.

Although alcoholic fermentation increases the temperature of the must, I’ve not ever personally seen or even heard that MLF will cause such an increase in temperature. Allowing temps to increase into the 70’s will certainly help kick off a natural or inoculated fermentation. If you keep your A/C set on temps in the low to mid 70’s, you shouldn’t have any problems.

Having said that, and knowing nothing substantial about sparkiling wines, is it typical to encourage MLF in the wine base? That’s normally desired in Chardonnays.......
 

Ajmassa

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Although alcoholic fermentation increases the temperature of the must, I’ve not ever personally seen or even heard that MLF will cause such an increase in temperature. Allowing temps to increase into the 70’s will certainly help kick off a natural or inoculated fermentation. If you keep your A/C set on temps in the low to mid 70’s, you shouldn’t have any problems.

Having said that, and knowing nothing substantial about sparkiling wines, is it typical to encourage MLF in the wine base? That’s normally desired in Chardonnays.......

I believe there’s some miscommunication going on here. Sounds like they have a wineroom with about 200gal of young sparkling wine AND a red wine about to undergo MLF. And bringing to room temp up to help the MLF asking if that will negatively affect the sparkling wine within same room.
Unfortunately clarity of the question itself is the only help I can offer here. I know 70-75° should be good for the MLF. And since still around room temp I doubt it would hurt the sparkling. But just a guess.
 

Johnd

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I believe there’s some miscommunication going on here. Sounds like they have a wineroom with about 200gal of young sparkling wine AND a red wine about to undergo MLF. And bringing to room temp up to help the MLF asking if that will negatively affect the sparkling wine within same room.
Unfortunately clarity of the question itself is the only help I can offer here. I know 70-75° should be good for the MLF. And since still around room temp I doubt it would hurt the sparkling. But just a guess.

Reading it again with the two wine scenario in mind, I think you're right, which makes my last sentence meaningless. Agree with your thought about the white base, 70 - 75 shouldn't be a problem for a short period of time.
 

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