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kuziwk

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looking for some help on making a saskatoon berry wine (Service Berry). I have bushes growing on my property and i can likely get about 20 LBS picked which is required for more recipies. One recipe calls for simmering the berries in a pot since they didnt have a press but im trying to impart fresh flavors and not sweet or cooked flavors. I dont own a press and this is the first time i would be making wine outside of a kit. Should i buy a Press? Or a juicer or what do i need? Since i like bold and tannic wines should i throw all the fruit pulp back into the fermenting juice or just some of it?


If i get a press can i crush the fruit with a 2x4 add water and sugar than ferment...than press the must? Not sure how the whole process works.
 

Johnd

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Don’t know much about Saskatoon, other than they look like blueberries, consistency more like apple, but this process is good for fruits without using a press:

First, freeze them, they’ll break down easier once thawed. When thawed, you should be able to mush up 20# in a bucket with the end of a sanitized 2x4 or 4x4 pretty easily in just a few batches. Don’t crush the seeds. Put crushed berries in your fermenter and add water, the less the better for taste, but your call. Add some pectic enzyme and a little sulfite and let sit covered in a cool place for 12-24 hours.

Check SG and adjust to your desired starting point, same for pH. Once you’ve got a balanced must, pitch yeast and cover. Have nutrients on hand, Fermaid K and O is a good balance, K at start of fermentation, O halfway through. Punch down the cap several times a day to keep the skins in contact with the wine.

When close to 1.000, strain the must through a muslin bag to catch the skins/pulp/seeds, and squeeze the juice out of the pulp into your wine. Put wine in a carboy with airlock to finish fermenting. When it’s below .998 and unchanged for three days, rack off of the gross lees into another carboy, sulfite @ 1/4 tsp per 6 gallons, top up and airlock.

In three months, rack off of sediment, sulfite, and top up again. Repeat the 3 month process (but skip the racking if you have no sediment) until the wine is crystal clear and free of CO2.

Do bench trials, adjusting pH and / or sweetness to your taste, adjust the whole batch based upon your taste (add sorbate if you’re adding sugar) and bottle one week later.
 

M38A1

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.....rack off of the gross lees into another carboy, sulfite @ 1/4 tsp per 6 gallons, top up and airlock.
Quick question..... Are you taking the junky sediment out and racking that to another carboy or are you taking the product out and moving that to another carboy? In other words, if using a racking cane, are you placing the pickup on the bottom of the sediment and bottom of the carboy and pulling out that stuff, or are you leaving the pickup just higher than the sediment and pulling out wine? The other thread there was a comment about the gross lees being on the sides and not in the center so this got me wondering what is preferred.
 

Johnd

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Quick question..... Are you taking the junky sediment out and racking that to another carboy or are you taking the product out and moving that to another carboy? In other words, if using a racking cane, are you placing the pickup on the bottom of the sediment and bottom of the carboy and pulling out that stuff, or are you leaving the pickup just higher than the sediment and pulling out wine? The other thread there was a comment about the gross lees being on the sides and not in the center so this got me wondering what is preferred.
Generally, when you rack, you want to take advantage of the opportunity to rid your wine of lees, but not leave any wine behind. How you do it depends upon what you are doing in your winemaking process. In wine from grapes with the grapes present in the ferment, when you rack the free run out of the fermenter, you pretty much get everything that the cane sucks up, you cant typically see what you are racking, and when pressing the skins, you get even more of the solids in the press run. Hence, in wines with grapes in it, much gets transferred. A few days after this transfer, when AF is done, or nearly so, the wine is racked off the sediment, which are the gross lees. If everything has gone right, the deposits in your future rackings are mostly just the fine lees.

In white wines or rose' wines, the process is different. Generally these grapes are pressed prior to fermentation and the juice is allowed to settle, then the clear juice is racked off of the sediments prior to starting fermentation. In this case, the gross lees are much less at the end of fermentation, and consist mostly of spent yeast cells and finer particulates that have settled out.

In your specific case (your rose' ish Muscadine), you pressed your grapes, but didn't settle out the solids prior to fermentation, so you have more gross lees at the end of fermentation than a pressed / settled wine would, but much less than one that was fermented with the skins, seeds, pulp, etc.

Please realize that I'm typing in generalities, and folks do things differently in different scenarios. I have been known to run my free run juice through a strainer lined with cheesecloth on its way to the carboy, and sometimes do the same with press run, sometimes just a strainer alone, really depends upon the wine at the time. If you've used a particularly active enzyme like EX-V to break down your grapes, these extra measures make more sense, as there is a lot more suspended particulate matter.
 

Ajmassa

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. I have bushes growing on my property and i can likely get about 20 LBS picked Should i buy a Press? Or a juicer or what do i need?
20lbs is small enough to be able to squeeze by hand or use a homemade bucket press.
Like John said, at the end of fermentation you can use a muslin bag. I’ve even used a large brew bag and lined a 7.9gal bucket with it for the whole ferment. At press time I just lifted the bag out, tie in a knot, and dropped right in my press bucket. Probably could hand squeeze too.
The amount of wine coming from pressing is minimal anyway. Sometimes it feels like the hassle of pressing isn’t worth that extra 10% or so. Here’s a pic of the brew bag and press bucket. IMG_4700.jpgIMG_4699.jpgIMG_4698.jpg
 

Scooter68

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Agree with mesh bag from the start. Many berries break down quite well, and especially if frozen before use.
I would personally never use heat for fear of 1) "Boiling off" any essences, or flavor and 2) Setting pectin into the juice. Pectin can really can really cloud up a wine for months and months, and months. I know it's a common practice with some folks and certain types or forms (Dried fruit). I just want to keep or preserve everything I can.
 
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Venatorscribe

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20lbs is small enough to be able to squeeze by hand or use a homemade bucket press.
Like John said, at the end of fermentation you can use a muslin bag. I’ve even used a large brew bag and lined a 7.9gal bucket with it for the whole ferment. At press time I just lifted the bag out, tie in a knot, and dropped right in my press bucket. Probably could hand squeeze too.
The amount of wine coming from pressing is minimal anyway. Sometimes it feels like the hassle of pressing isn’t worth that extra 10% or so. Here’s a pic of the brew bag and press bucket. View attachment 49929View attachment 49930View attachment 49931
I follow a similar method. Brew bags are wonderful in this technique. I don't press afterwards - just a few squeezes and extract all the free run juice.
 
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