Wine Juice Question

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pete1325

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Hi, I ordered two (23L) pails of (Chilean) wine juice (Malbec & Grenache) and have a quick question. If the juice starts to ferment from wild yeast do I add potassium metabisulfite or potassium-sorbate to stop the activity before pitching yeast? If so how much of which one? Thanks
 

stickman

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Don't add potassium sorbate. If the temperature of the juice pail is still cold 45 to 55F then adding potassium metabisulfite is ok, it should reduce the activity for certain cold fermenting wild yeast, but if the temperature is higher, the sulfite may not do much good. In fact, adding sulfite to a fermenting bucket causes the yeast to generate excess acetaldehyde.
 

Julie

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do not add sorbate! Go ahead and add the k-meta, 1/4 tsp per 6 gallon wait a day and then add your yeast. Also, if you have any tannins add that, it improves the mouth feel.
 

salcoco

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I would not add anything. just pitch your yeast. the competition between the cultured yeast and the "wild" yeast will always lean toward the cultured yeast.It will take over the fermentation. adding sulfur will only stress the new yeast with off odors as a result.
 

pete1325

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Thanks for the advise......

Julie; I know everybody's taste is different but do you have a "rule of thumb" on how much tannin to start with?
 

kevinlfifer

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I would add oak chips to the primary. For me one cup to start, then oak sticks if needed during clearing and bulk aging.

NO Sorbate! (picking up on a theme) Since you are going to make a dry wine you will not need the sorbate at all.
 

Stevelaz

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Hi, any thoughts on adding nutrients prior to or at the same time I pitch my yeast?
Pete, Last year i did 3 buckets (18 gallon) of Chilean Merlot and fermented in a 30 gallon barrrel I used go firm to rehydrate the yeast and then fermaid k nutrient during the primary. Worked very well and im very pleased with my wine this year. Im going to use them again and i recommend using them. I found an old thread about them i will paste here, or just google it.....

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Although not included with any kits, nor even mentioned in the instructions that come with kits, I always use these products when rehydrating my yeast. Must be due to the fact I started with meads, and have made more than a few high-gravity (1.125+) batches and have NEVER had any issues with fermentations. Here is some information that very clearly demonstrates the 'hows' and 'whys' relative to these nutrients:


A Recommended Guide to Yeast Nutrient dosages:
The following is a recommended nutrient schedule based on the latest research from Lallemand. It has been conceived to ensure the maximum viability of yeast throughout the entire course of a fermentation, and it is comprised of two, separate additions: "Go Ferm", and "Fermaid-K".
-The first nutrient addition is done by adding "Go Ferm" directly into the water used to hydrate the yeast. This represents a new approach and is important because by making this first nutrient dosage outside of the must, you are able to eliminate potential problems early-on: namely the binding-up of certain nutrients by SO2 (thus making them unavailable to the yeast), and the possible, partial depletion of the nutrient addition due to the early feeding of other organisms that may have gotten into the must before the yeast have had a chance to reach the cell-density needed to begin the fermentation (again, lowering the level of nutrients ultimately available to the yeast). It is this "Go Ferm" addition, therefore, that will ensure that the yeast will receive the whole of the nutrient addition without any interference, -and this in turn translates to the start of a clean and healthy fermentation.
-However, your work is not done…As the fermentation progresses, the must becomes a more difficult place to work in for the yeast: the alcohol level starts to rise (slowly becoming more and more toxic) and all of the nutrients that were present at the beginning of the fermentation start to become depleted. "Fermaid-K" is then used at 1/3 sugar depletion (usually an 8-10 brix drop) so that the nutrients required by the yeast to maintain a healthy metabolism all the way through to the end of fermentation are available to them before they become stressed and you start to see signs of a stuck or sluggish fermentation (not to mention excessive VA and Hydrogen-Sulphide production!).
*It may be helpful to think of the following analogy: "Go Ferm" is the complete breakfast that is eaten on the morning of the 20-mile race, and "Fermaid-K" is the energy bars and sports drinks that are consumed at the mid-way point to help get you to the finish line!

Dosage- Rates:
"Go Ferm": Rate is 1.25 grams of "Go Ferm" / 1 gram of yeast / 17mls of water.
"Fermaid-K": Rate is 1 gram per 1 gallon of must.
How to Hydrate Dry Wine Yeast using "Go Ferm" (A Recommended Nutrient Regimen):
1) Using clean water (filtered or distilled is best), calculate the amount needed and heat it to 110 degrees F (43 degree C).
2) Add the required amount of "Go Ferm" to the heated water. Mix it in well so that there are no clumps, and let it stand until the temp of the mixture falls to 102 degrees F (39 degrees C).
3) Add the required amount of yeast to the mixture. Stir it to break-up any clumps and wait 15-30 minutes.
4) At this point you will want to add a portion of the must/juice into the yeast mixture that is ½ to equal the volume of the yeast starter. This helps the yeast become accustomed to the pH, TA%, brix level (sugar), and the temperature of the must they will ultimately be fermenting, and is done to avoid shocking them.
5) After a 10-15 minute wait, the yeast should now be ready introduce into the must!
6) *Once the fermentation is underway, it is highly recommended to add "Fermaid-K" at a rate of 1 gram per gallon at 1/3 sugar depletion (after an 8-10 brix drop).
Example of volumes needed:
-Say you are inoculating 6 gallons of must. This would mean that you would be using:
A) 6 grams of yeast
B) 7.5 grams of "Go Ferm"
C) 100mls of water
D) 50-100mls of must/juice


E) 6 grams of "Fermaid-K" at 1/3 sugar depletion




Hope you find this helpful,

- GL63
 
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