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Wine Degassing Tool?

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McSwain

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Is there a tool or instrument that can tell you when you wine is degassed enough to bottle?
 

cmason1957

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yep and you own it already. Assuming you have a tall test vessel for putting your hydrometer and a sample in. Fill that up about half-way. Cover the top with your hand. Give it a heck of a good shake or four. When you remove your hand listen for a pop and also look at the top of the sample for lots of bubbles, you almost always get some. No pop, you are probably degassed enough, pop, wait a month and try again.
 

Rice_Guy

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Tool, ,,,, no ;-(

Many wines including small commercial venues will bottle wine with residual CO2. As a diagnostic if I see some bubbles on the edge of a cylinder I will pull a vacuum on it, 5 inches with lots of bubbles is bad, ,,10 inches with bubbles showing up I consider “normal”. As a state fair judge about 25% of country wines will have this and hardly any reds (aged more?).
.05C1453A-0EC3-4293-8EA1-D863CF79850F.jpeg
The above was the local winery with a sample of Briana. I do not expect gas bubbles from a major producer, as Gallo.
 

McSwain

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yep and you own it already. Assuming you have a tall test vessel for putting your hydrometer and a sample in. Fill that up about half-way. Cover the top with your hand. Give it a heck of a good shake or four. When you remove your hand listen for a pop and also look at the top of the sample for lots of bubbles, you almost always get some. No pop, you are probably degassed enough, pop, wait a month and try again.
Very sophisticated! haha!!! I've always degassed with a drill attachment a few times a week. I think your method is spot on!
 

Fingaluna

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McSwain,
Yes there are very accurate tools. The Zahm SS-60 or Haffmans Gehaltemeter are two, but they are quite costly.
A poor-man's version of the Zahm is a closed bottle with a pressure gauge attached in the cap. Fill to almost full (same level every time), shake for 1 min, and watch the pressure gauge for changes. Using a CO2 temperature / pressure chart, you can get a close estimate to the amount of remaining CO2. Wear gloves to prevent your hands from heating the sample which would change the reading. You are looking for less than 0.25 Volumes on your Reds, less than 0.4 Volumes on your Whites.
Cheers!
 

Ajmassa

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The tool I use to degas : Time.

And time also lets your wine bulk age.

With wine, time is your friend. Best to use what time you have to your advantage. Fine wine making takes time.
Father Time and Mother Nature—
My favorite degassers and clarifiers!

@cmason1957 whenever I try the thumb ‘pop’ test I seem to always hear a pop, regardless of the co2. Even with water. I tend to default to basing on the fizz or bubbles generated after shaking. To test ph I’ll shake up a test tube a bunch of times letting fizz dissipate in between shakes.
@McSwain if I pull a vacuum ill note the bubbles. I rigged some bungs to accept VacuVin stoppers and pump it. If there’s co2 in there it’ll draw some fizz. if I can’t draw fizz then I figure there’s not enough to be a factor.

I did a kit rosè few years ago and was stubborn as hell. Killed myself trying to degas to bottle it. After that debacle I learned many commercial rosé & white have a small amount of Co2 and a little is perfectly fine.
 

cmason1957

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@Ajmassa Agreed, I get a small pop, almost no matter what, but when there is much CO2 in there, the bubbles look different and the pop is more noticable. Really, I don't ever check that way, once it is racked the normal 4 or 5 times with appropriate time between and using the vacuum system of the allinonewinepump, I know I'm not going to have any issues, so I just go with it. But I used to use the test, back before the pump
 
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Ajmassa

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@Ajmassa Agreed, I get a small pop, almost no matter what, but when there is much CO2 in there, the bubbles look different and the pop isn't as noticable. Really, I don't ever check that way, once it is racked the normal 4 or 5 times with appropriate time between and using the vacuum system of the allinonewinepump, I know I'm not going to have any issues, so I just go with it. But I used to use the test, back before the pump
Agree. I don’t ever check for co2 or manually degas normally, but I did for kits. It’s just something I take notice of whenever putting the wine under vacuum or shaking up young samples for ph. I make 99% red wine so it’s been a non issue.

but now I’ve ventured into rosé wines I’m thinking I might have to deal with it since I’d like to bottle it early. 7 or 8 months I guess. I wanna drink it next summer!
 

cmason1957

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I think your Rosé wines at 7-8 months should be just fine. Maybe it's just me (or maybe a delusion), but kit wines always seem to hold on to more CO2 than wines from grapes. I have no explanation why that might be, but it seems that way.
 

sjjan

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I think your Rosé wines at 7-8 months should be just fine. Maybe it's just me (or maybe a delusion), but kit wines always seem to hold on to more CO2 than wines from grapes. I have no explanation why that might be, but it seems that way.
I have just started out making wine from grapes: a rosé wine and two white wines. All three wines are in the SS tanks and past their primary fermentation phase.

I have just bought some juice concentrate to make red wine (from the concentrate). It is an experiment as I have no idea of the quality of the wine that can come out of it. Is degassing an issue that I would now have to take into account? or can I just age the red wine (from juice concentrate) a bit longer (6 months?) which would get rid of most CO2 naturally by time as is happening (I hope) with the rosé and white wines I am making?
 

cmason1957

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I have just started out making wine from grapes: a rosé wine and two white wines. All three wines are in the SS tanks and past their primary fermentation phase.

I have just bought some juice concentrate to make red wine (from the concentrate). It is an experiment as I have no idea of the quality of the wine that can come out of it. Is degassing an issue that I would now have to take into account? or can I just age the red wine (from juice concentrate) a bit longer (6 months?) which would get rid of most CO2 naturally by time as is happening (I hope) with the rosé and white wines I am making?
It is hard to say for sure, but probably the time will remove most of it. Some wines seem to hold on to the CO2 more than others.
 

Old Corker

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Generally my process is to use the AIO for degassing. I do strictly wine kits. Once fermentation is done, when I transfer off the lees to start clearing, I will take the transfer tube off, hold my thumb over the pipe and run the pump until I see bubbles start to rise. I do that for the next couple of rackings and can pretty much tell if there is CO2 by the bubble behavior. Of course from that point on I keep it topped up.
 

sjjan

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Generally my process is to use the AIO for degassing. I do strictly wine kits. Once fermentation is done, when I transfer off the lees to start clearing, I will take the transfer tube off, hold my thumb over the pipe and run the pump until I see bubbles start to rise. I do that for the next couple of rackings and can pretty much tell if there is CO2 by the bubble behavior. Of course from that point on I keep it topped up.
I have another pump than the All-in-One pump (thanks to reading this forum that I recognized that AIO must be that pump). So why do you keep your thumb over the the pipe and run the pump? What are you trying to do?

I can imagine that by racking the wine from one tank to another I might loose quite a bit of CO2?

See below my setup. I am planning to make 150 liter of red wine from grape concentrates in one of the empty SS tanks.

5191438A-D0B2-446A-894E-4E5C012E24B4.jpeg
6147BAB3-C364-42FA-ACFA-C4DAF99B42AD.jpeg
7ABD0BFA-D95D-404C-B2C9-06B158D48619.jpeg
 

McSwain

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I have another pump than the All-in-One pump (thanks to reading this forum that I recognized that AIO must be that pump). So why do you keep your thumb over the the pipe and run the pump? What are you trying to do?

I can imagine that by racking the wine from one tank to another I might loose quite a bit of CO2?

View attachment 67613
What brand and size are your tanks? I like them.
 

Old Corker

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The All in One uses a stopper drilled for two pipes. One to attach to the pump with draws the vacuum into the empty carboy. The other is tubed to the source vessel that is holding the must to transfer it to the empty one. Once all the wine is transferred I take that tube off. I seal it with my thumb and run the pump to pull a harder vacuum for degassing purposes.
Really liked your pictures. My setup looks quite different with 20 and 23 liter glass carboys :b
 

sjjan

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So. by drawing a vacuum, you are effectively taking out the CO2? Not sure if I can do that with my pump, which is just a straight forward pump (it does have a bypass). No features that allow it to draw a vacuum.

As for your glass carboys. The wine won’t know the difference and the proof is in the pudding, so I might have nice tanks, the result still has to show. :)
 
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