Wine Bucket homemade

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lovethepirk

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I was in Home Depot(home improvement store in the US) and saw some orange large buckets that fit very tight! They cost $4 USD.

My bucket cost me $20.

I see wine fermentor "Grommets" (rubber pieces that go in hole that you drill) are very cheap.

Anyone here make there own?
Any here know any way to do this without buying the grommet as I am in a HURRY to start another batch, LOL :):):):):)
 

Tom

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Just make sure its food grade and has HDPE stamped on the bottom.
You need to drill a 1/2" hole in the lid and then get a rubber grommet. That will accept the airlock.
 

lovethepirk

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Tom,

THANKS for the advice on the buckets stamped HDPE, I will look into it. I do NOT want a bucket that is NOT food grade!!!!

Where did you get your rubber grommets?

Thanks...
 
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Tom

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Any home ctr of good hdwe store. Just look for ones that fit into a 1/2 " hole]
 

cpfan

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There is no reason to drill a hole in the lid and use an air lock on a primary fermenter. Just sit the lid on top.

A few years ago, one of the posters (probably at winepress) contacted one of the bucket manufacturers (Ropak, I think). As I recall, the response was that only the white buckets were food grade. Obviously, that only applies to the one manufacturer, but .....

I saw those orange buckets in Home Depot and wondered if I had a use for one. Because of the colour and the above comment, never even considered it for wine making.

If I wanted a cheap

Steve
 

BobF

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There is no reason to drill a hole in the lid and use an air lock on a primary fermenter. Just sit the lid on top.

Steve
I snap the lid on mine and plug the airlock hole with a cotton ball. I would hate to have a gnat, fruitfly or something else get in.

For this reason, I like having the hole ... but no need for a grommet if you're making one instead of buying.
 

Madriver Wines

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Just sit the lid on top. No need to drill a hole. I use a lid that does not snap down but it seals well enough to keep bugs out. I got it at Lowes, it is grey, food grade and was $2.64
 

Luc

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myakkagldwngr

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I thought I saw on a previous posting that there were #'s on the bottom of plastic products and if it was the right # then it was good to go.
I can't remember the exact numbers but the orange "Homer" buckets had the right number. I've used several for primarys. The only problem is that after snapping the lid on and then removing it several times it cracks over the gasket.
 

cpfan

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Personally, I believe that the number on the bottom is the type of plastic for the recyclers to know and has nothing to do with Food Grade or not.

For example, I believe that Food Grade products cannot be made from recycled plastic. That orange Homer bucket may be made from recycled plastic.

Steve
 

Tom

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I thought I saw on a previous posting that there were #'s on the bottom of plastic products and if it was the right # then it was good to go.
I can't remember the exact numbers but the orange "Homer" buckets had the right number. I've used several for primarys. The only problem is that after snapping the lid on and then removing it several times it cracks over the gasket.
If that # is in a triangle then that tells you if it can be recycled.
 

Tom

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Good article,
That clears things up..
Thanks
 

kiljoy

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Hi guys,

I work for a company that makes machinery for the recycling industry. I have spent much time at recycling facilities and am aware of the recycling codes. The number corresponds to the type of material. It’s kind of redundant, but PET(1), HDPE(2), PVC(3), all have a number associated with them. It is so they can hand sort easier.
That being said. Several types of plastic are food grade. Soda bottles are made of PET. HDPE is used in juice bottles. So, any type of plastic can be used in food grade products. It’s up to the manufacturer to make sure that it is actually food grade. So, if it didn’t originally hold food, or it was not sold as a food container. Don’t use it.

Here’s a good link I found. http://www.virtualweberbullet.com/plastics.html#foodgrade
 
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