Wine and fingers

Help Support Wine Making Talk:

Michael Vino

Member
Joined
Jan 10, 2007
Messages
67
Reaction score
0
The other day I was speaking to a friend about wine and she asked what does it mean when someone describes a wine as having fingers..... I told her I was unsure but knew of this great web site/forum that I would ask and see what that means.........


Thanks in advance.....mike
 

summersolstice

Drunken Friar Cellars
Joined
Nov 4, 2005
Messages
220
Reaction score
1
Do you think she could have meantlarger appendages such as"legs"?
 

rshosted

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 24, 2005
Messages
400
Reaction score
0
When you swirl a glass and it leaves a clear line of where the wine was swirled up to (on the sides of the glass), then it runs down in 'lines' often called "legs" or "fingers"

Some say the more you can see legs in wine the higher quality wine. I personally have tasted wine with and without legs and not noticed that much. Though I will say you can usually tell a sweeter wine from the legs. I believe it is because the sugar seems to be a little thicker on the glass and takes a little longer to run back to the bottom.

I like to swirl and look becuase it also improves the ability to notice the boquet of the wine.
 

Francie

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2006
Messages
189
Reaction score
0
One more note on "fingers/legs", the more distinct they are, the more body the wine will have. For example, a Pinot Grigio will not be as noticable as a Chard.


2 cents
 

masta

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 4, 2004
Messages
3,517
Reaction score
9
<DIV id=aCtt>The fingers or legs:


Every once in a while you will see someone swirl their glass of wine, raise it towards the light and watch with bated breath for the wine's legs to appear, a mythical indicator of wine quality. These legs, or tears as the French refer to them, are the streaks of wine forming on the side of the wine glass. The legs were once thought to be associated with a wine's quality (the more legs, the higher the quality). However, the legs have more to do with physics, the wine's surface tension and alcohol content, than perceived quality. Wine is a mixture of alcohol and water, the alcohol has a faster evaporation rate and a lower surface tension than water, effectively forcing the alcohol to evaporate at a faster rate. This dynamic allows the water's surface tension and concentration to increase, pushing the legs up the glass until the surface tension pushes the water into beads. Finally, gravity wins the battle and forces the liquid to tear down the glass in a defeated streak. Still not convinced that it's physics and not quality that drives this phenomenon? Try covering your next glass of wine and see if the legs present dramatically decrease when covered compared to when open. No evaporation, no legs. Enjoy none the less.
 

Michael Vino

Member
Joined
Jan 10, 2007
Messages
67
Reaction score
0
rshosted, northern wino, francie and masta thank you all for the information and education. I knew I came to the right place to learn...
You guys (and girls) ROCK!
 
Group Builder
Top