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RedSun

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I need to set my trellis. Waited too long.

This is going to be 3 rows, each about 15 vines. So total about 45. Most are Marquette and some table grapes. The spacing is 8' and I'm thinking about high cordon trellis.

Some questions:
1. What is the best way for the end post? Deadman's anchor? Or extra post and wire?
2. How long the posts should be? 10' or longer? The high cordon should be about 7-8' tall?
3. I'm thinking of placing some 2-3 main posts in the middle and medium size post at each vine. Make sense?
4. Where is the best place to buy those posts? Do folks use treated lumbers? Or use red cedar or other natural posts?

Time to get back to this forum.... Too many hobbies.

Thx folks....
 

Rice_Guy

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You are longer, i have six per row
* each plant has an eight foot metal fence post, it started with six foot however longer will support the wire too
* end post is treated 4-4 by eight, in ten years I have had three posts break at ground level which I would attribute to poor quality posts since they feel soft when pulled out
* the system is basically self supporting, the last one was in July and I haven’t replaced it yet, the metal by each plant is carrying the end post
 

RedSun

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I just talked to one fellow who has a local vineyard. He said:

1. Only two end posts are needed. The middle posts can be smaller or use metal posts.
2. The posts can be 10' long with about 2' in ground.
3. He uses treated lumber, either round or square. He said we can get those posts at HD or Lowes.

I'm thinking I probably still need some strong mid post(s) the same size of end posts. Not sure if that is overkill. Marquette is not very strong vine. But some of the table vines like Concord and Reliance are vigorous. I only grow one each though.

Still need to know how to anchor the end posts.
 

Rice_Guy

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The round posts are the ones I have had an issue with, check what the treating is rated for
 

RedSun

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So treated lumber is just fine? I remember quite some discussions here back then.
 

Rice_Guy

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20 year old treated had arsenic but you should not find it. Modern, CC3 is copper, a guess is if it says ground contact rated it should be a decade plus.
 

VinesnBines

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I’m using 8 foot treated (round) fence posts for line posts. I’m sinking 2 feet in the ground so 6 foot tall. I don’t plan on the high cordon being over 5.5 feet. We are short people. The end posts will be 10 foot with 4 feet in the ground and either H post or angled with anchor posts. If I have a problem with line posts, I’m going to reset with concrete. I had to use metal posts for temporary trellis in my 2 year vines. My line posts are 18 feet apart. Metal posts go in faster but not as pretty. Cost is about the same. I’m getting posts at a fence company but Lowe’s or Home Depot have them at similar cost.
 

NoQuarter

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I just grow muscadine grapes. ( Pierces Disease)
I place my middle post between vines and just drill a hole through each at top. Use extra long end posts and go down deep. Pour concrete around end post unless you have heavy soil.
use secondary shorter end posts. I run cable from short stout post up through all the holes in other posts and use ratchets on each end. ( I used turnbuckles at first but kept bottoming them out )
At nearly 80lb grapes per vine I need to ratchet cable tight at least twice a year.
I grow a single trunk, two cordon down the wire and spur prune.
 

TurkeyHollow

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We used 4"x6"x8' PT timbers. 2' were buried in the ground surrounded by large flat rocks and patio blocks. We did this to help keep any water away from the timbers and to simplify replacement when they break down (hopefully not too soon). We also installed a 4"x4"x6' PT brace to help with the optimistically anticipated grape load. Our top wire is at about 65", mid wire is at about 52" and bottom wire is about 30". You can get ideas from these links: https://doubleavineyards.com/index.php/downloads/dl/file/id/83/product/0/midwirecordon.pdf https://doubleavineyards.com/index.php/downloads/dl/file/id/84/product/0/topwirecordon.pdf.End posts.jpg
 

VinesnBines

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Vines Sept 24 III.jpg

You can see the second year vines on the metal posts and the first year on the wood. First mistake; didn't dig post holes for trellis in the 2019 planting and heavy clay makes slow going by hand. We only have a support wire in so far. We have an acre planted and this is about 1/2 the planted area.
 

GrinderBoy

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Though it may not be the best solution, I used 16' x 60" cattle panels cut in half to make 8' x 60" panels for a non traditional trellis. We had, sandy, loam soil, fence staples to hold panels. 4x4" x 10' in ground 3'. One post at each end, vine root in the center.

We have sold the house and moved across the country since then. I regret not having photos beyond the first season after planting. IMG_20140417_162427_743.jpgI have no contact with the current owners to know how it worked out.

I patterned my trellis after an old couple's place in the area who used their grapes to make wine and jelly. Their's worked well.
 
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