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Where do the notes and flavors come from?

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Kaitala

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I made a sauv blanc. I find it pretty tasty. It's super young, so I dont get any dinstinct notes, but it's not just blah alcohol.

Went to dinner tonight and ordered a sauv blanc. House quality, dont know which one. Had distinct notes of pear.

Where does that come from? Is it the yeast, the grapes, a combo? Is it flavored with stuff after fermentation? I've had others with strong citrus. Others with green notes.

With reds, sometimes cherry, or berry or licorice? How do we get those? Is it something in the grape or the yeast or the combo or what?
 

franc1969

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All of the above? Grape varieties have usual flavors, they change based on where it's growing (terroir) and the year (vintage). Spice can be in grape type, produced by yeast type, or introduced in wood aging. Mouthfeel and esters are produced by different yeasts, but fermentation could be more focused on varietal characteristics vs what yeast adds.
You can find wines with added flavors to enhance what is inherent, but that's more often found in wine kits. Like those green apple-reisling kits. Commercial wines have less added flavors, mainly because of TTB regulations and consumer expectations. At home, you can do and make what you like, add flavors at will. It's easier to do the research into types of grape and yeast, and expected flavors, then tweak if you want.
Read through WineFolly, etc, the ScottLabs manual, MoreWine! manual. Very instructive and will give you an idea of where to go based on what you like, and what you have available to ferment.
 

mainshipfred

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All of the above? Grape varieties have usual flavors, they change based on where it's growing (terroir) and the year (vintage). Spice can be in grape type, produced by yeast type, or introduced in wood aging. Mouthfeel and esters are produced by different yeasts, but fermentation could be more focused on varietal characteristics vs what yeast adds.
You can find wines with added flavors to enhance what is inherent, but that's more often found in wine kits. Like those green apple-reisling kits. Commercial wines have less added flavors, mainly because of TTB regulations and consumer expectations. At home, you can do and make what you like, add flavors at will. It's easier to do the research into types of grape and yeast, and expected flavors, then tweak if you want.
Read through WineFolly, etc, the ScottLabs manual, MoreWine! manual. Very instructive and will give you an idea of where to go based on what you like, and what you have available to ferment.
Very nicely put, I think you pretty much covered all the bases.
 

JohnT

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Just about every decision you make in winemaking will affect the notes and flavors...

Type of grape
what yeast to use.
temp of ferment
slow or fast ferment
type of nutrients
when to rack
how many times to rack
ph/acid levels
weather to oak or not
type of oak and duration
Oak barrel or oak additives
weather to undergo MLF
type of mlb to use
how long to bulk age
what type of vessel to age in
cold stabilization

above just scratches the surface. the amount of choices made by the winemaker is why winemaking is an art form.
 

Rice_Guy

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Isn’t building flavors fun , :thg
Just about every decision you make in winemaking will affect the notes and flavors...

Type of grape
what yeast to use.
temp of ferment
slow or fast ferment
type of nutrients
when to rack
how many times to rack
ph/acid levels
weather to oak or not
type of oak and duration
Oak barrel or oak additives
weather to undergo MLF
type of mlb to use
how long to bulk age
what type of vessel to age in
cold stabilization

above just scratches the surface. the amount of choices made by the winemaker is why winemaking is an art form.
 

joeswine

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The Flavor God's that's were it all comes from.
And yes citrus Zest is just one element a wine maker can use. The key is your understanding of the base.and it's profile.
 

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