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When is PH too low?

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JRM850

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I have a white muscadine that has fermented dry and has been racked twice. The PH is 3.0-2.99 but I really like it. What are the consequences from being lower than the the recommended range?

Thanks.
 

Johnd

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I have a white muscadine that has fermented dry and has been racked twice. The PH is 3.0-2.99 but I really like it. What are the consequences from being lower than the the recommended range?

Thanks.
With a pH at 3.0 and completed fermentation, you have a wine that is quite microbially stable, there are no consequences if it doesn’t taste tart or sharp from the acidity. It’ll take very little sulfite to protect it, and if it’s good, then all is well, because that’s what really matters.
 

JRM850

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... if it doesn’t taste tart or sharp from the acidity. It’ll take very little sulfite to protect it, and if it’s good, then all is well, because that’s what really matters.
There is some sharpness; if I had to compare with a well known commercial wine, I would say it is similar to the sharpness of a New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc like a Kim Crawford. I was kind of hoping that part would tone down a bit with age, but I have zero experience with what to expect from acid levels with age.
 

Johnd

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It may tone down a tad. I’m like you, like some acid zing in a white wine.
 

Scooter68

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Depending on how much CO2 remains in the wine from fermentation that pH might be skewed a little. How long since fermentation finished?
The real key of course is if you like it... then it's not a problem. If you intend to age remember to recheck the pH before bottling to see if it changes.

(By the way once the fermentation finishes, I don't take a pH reading until just before bottling. I take one last reading so I know what to put on the label. Since I don't sell my wine it's just for my personal information later on along with the ABV and final SG reading.)
 
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Johnd

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This is something I forget to do about 90% of the time. Curious- how much can co2 really affect the results ? Are we talking .1 or is it all over the place?
I find that it varies, just put it in a small test tube, warm, shake and release a few times, and you’re good to go.
 

JRM850

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Depending on how much CO2 remains in the wine from fermentation that pH might be skewed a little.
This I did not know. I've taken PH readings during full blown ferment. Haha.

How long since fermentation finished?
Fermentation on this one finished about two weeks ago. I aired it out pretty well when I racked it on Saturday by spraying it on the side of the carboy as it filled. (Somewhat unintentional)

I haven't designed a label yet, or even came up with a clever name yet for that matter, but I do intent to add spots for the details like you do.
 

Scooter68

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Gas in new wines can vary - I'm not aware of any specific rule-of-thumb that would give you an idea of how much gas is present and how much it actually affect readings. But I would just suggest that since the wine is certainly at a safe level (Plenty of acid present to help prevent spoiling) just let it age fully and don't worry with measuring the pH again until you get closer to bottling time. You can always adjust the acidity downward a few weeks before bottling.
 

garymc

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Muscadines are known for being acidic. There are 2 reasons that I know of to be concerned about the pH. One is that the yeast will only work in a certain pH range. You've passed that concern. The other is that the taste is affected by the acidity. Metrics like pH are nice, but you've tasted it and it tastes good. What more do you want?
 

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