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how many have used or tried using ZESTING


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joeswine

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The good, the bad and ugly

Sulfur compounds
Sulfur is used as an additive throughout the wine making process, primarily to stop oxidation as mentioned above but also as antimicrobial agent. When managed properly in wine, its presence there is often undetected, however when used recklessly it can contribute to flavor and aroma taints which are very volatile and potent. Sulfur compounds typically have low sensory thresholds.
Sulfur dioxide


Sulfur dioxide is a common wine additive, used for its antioxidant and preservative properties. When its use is not managed well it can be over added, with its perception in wine reminiscent of matchsticks, burnt rubber, or mothballs. Wines such as these are often termed sulfitic.
Hydrogen sulfide


Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is generally thought to be a metabolic by-product of yeast fermentation in nitrogen limited environments. It is formed when yeast ferments via the sulfate reduction pathway. Fermenting wine is often supplemented with diammonium phosphate (DAP) as a nitrogen source to prevent H2S formation. The sensory threshold for hydrogen sulfide is 8-10 μg/L, with levels above this imparting a distinct rotten egg aroma to the wine. Hydrogen sulfide can further react with wine compounds to form mercaptans and disulfides.
[ Mercaptans


ethyl mercaptan


Mercaptans (thiols) are produced in wine by the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with other wine components such as ethanol or sulfur containing amino acids, such as methionine. They can be formed if finished wine is allowed prolonged contact with the lees. This can be prevented by racking the wine. Mercaptans have a very low sensory threshold, around 1.5 µg/L,[6] with levels above causing onion, rubber, and skunk type odours.
] Dimethyl sulfide


Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is naturally present in most wines, probably from the breakdown of sulfur containing amino acids. Like ethyl acetate, levels of DMS below the sensory threshold can have a positive effect on flavour, contributing to fruitiness, fullness, and complexity. Levels above the sensory threshold of >30 µg/L in white wines and >50 µg/L for red wines, give the wine characteristics of cooked cabbage, canned corn, asparagus or truffles. Note that dimethyl sulfide is not formed from the oxidation of mercaptans, but dimethyl disulfide is.

Sulfur in the wine is always present and if you are not careful it could be the good, the bad and the ugly, it may not show up in the beginning , or it may show up in the beginning, the things to do with sulfur problems tibial-is , and sometimes to no avail, sanitation stay with the process and vigilance are the key . I keep reading, threads of how I have rotten eggs smell and so forth and so on this is all due to sulfur by products and it's relationship with the wine/ for the good and the bad . , trying read the above try and understand was telling you to hard chemistry lesson to try and learn I know that , that is why most cases kids do not have a problem it usually deal with fresh juice and are are homemade concoctions that we end up having a problem is also a problem with fresh grapes as opposed to kit . the wine defects and faults listed above are some of the most common from heat related oxygen oxidation to Cork taint and the rest . what I would do is print out this page posted somewhere in your wine area or in a book something to go back to for refer, - you will run into these problems no doubt sooner or later- you will run into the good, the bad and the ugly :slp
 
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joeswine

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Our new topic here is going to be called "Extracts, Fpacks, and Simple Syrup, Oh My!" =-)


 

joeswine

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Zesting is the process of the removal of the color of most citrus fruits and other entities that are extracted (for their essence). We use a micro plane zester to accomplish our end. See pictures. (If you do not have a micro plane zester you can use a fine cheese grater (Your goal is to get the color off the fruit, not the pitch,which is the “white stuff” underneath the very top layer of the fruit.)
Here are some of my recipes that I use for making extracts. It takes at least 1 month to exract the essentials from the fruit,longer would always be better.



All recipes aremeasured out with one quart Ball Jar.


Citrus Extract:Consists of The zest of 2 limes, the zest of 2 lemons, and the zest of 2grapefruits, and the remainder is ever Kleer.

Coffee Extract:fill Ball jar up with roasted coffee beans (your choice), fill the balance ofthe Ball jar with Ever Kleer.

Cinnemon Extract-~approx. 12 sticks per Ball jar, top up with Ever Kleer

Lemon extract- The Zest of 12 lemons per jar, top up withEver Kleer

Orange extract:The zest of approx.. 8 oranges per jar. Valenzia oranges work best but any typewill do.

Key Lime Extract:1 bag of key limes with the limes cut in half.

Vanilla Extract: 6Madagascar Vanilla Beans, sliced length wise. Put all 6 in a ball jar and topoff with Ever Kleer.

At the end of one full year its best to pour the extractthrough some sort of filter (I strain mine through a coffee filter) and addsome additional zest of the same type back to it and top it off with EverKleer.

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Runningwolf

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That awesome Joe. I assume you just add a small amount say to a five gallon carboy?
 

Sacalait

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I zested 12 grapefruit as you did and used a pint jar filled with ever clear. I only had to add 5cc to a 2 gallon batch of grapefruit wine to make a astonishing difference. I've also done tangerines but haven't used any yet.
 

joeswine

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Additions

Wolfman, if you are going to do a 5 gallon batch, let us say you want to make an Orange Seville sangria .and I would use the zest of three oranges Valencia will be my first choice ,or any thick skinned orange at least three, then let your taste buds be your guide. Like the pics, Kate and I will do some real fun things with wine picks this year. Hope to be as informative as they are fun to do.


Always think outside the box :wy
 

hocke230

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Joe - what do you think about adding some Zest to that zinfandel batch I have going... It really needs to be spiced up a bit.
 

joeswine

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zinfandel

I'll tell you what goes good with Zin,pomegranate if you could work that in some how either juice or extracted juice from fresh fruit thats ths way I would go and have gone








.....:HB GOING OF LINE FOR A WEEK....................
 

joeswine

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zesting another way to go

the addition of fruit into wine has been around since wine making began,the zest is the outer covering of the fruit in most all cases it's citrus of some sort,review the PICS AND ,,this week coming up I'll do a demo on making a espresso extract and turning that extract into a



EXPRESSO COFFEE CELLO...............:wy
 

robie

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the addition of fruit into wine has been around since wine making began,the zest is the outer covering of the fruit in most all cases it's citrus of some sort,review the PICS AND ,,this week coming up I'll do a demo on making a espresso extract and turning that extract into a



EXPRESSO COFFEE CELLO...............:wy
Looking forward to it, Joe!!!
 

joeswine

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Extracts – f-pack – simple syrup

These are the basic elements that we add to our wines . Some of the purest in our group never think of doing this and that is okay that is their way is the way they believe in nothing wrong with that ,. However
.there those of us. WHO do not mind experimentation. Ad that is with this next. Thread is all about. Making and adding. Aditives to our wine, and this is what. When good wines on bad was all about . .Since sake. Stay tune. Ad be ready to think outside the box,. O the six local. I my are. O which. I personally know for. I do not know any of the four. .Have not had to think outside the box............................ stay tune...........:wy

go back and review the pictorials............................yours jp
 

joeswine

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How to make Simple syrup

To make Simple Syrup By Joe and Pictures by Kate (Neviawen)

We use Pure Can Sugar Only.

Simple syrup is a 2 to 1 blend (2 parts sugar, 1 part water)

We use ball jars as a measuring device because that is what I store it in.

So, this batch was 4-to-2 blend. (4 ball jars sugar, 2 ball jars water)
which equates to 4 full ball jars of simple syrup ready to use anytime.

First:
Measure out sugar to water ratio.

Next, add sugar to a large metal pot.

Now is a good time to take the ball jars and place them in the sink in a
tray and have your lids ready and your hot mittens (cooking gloves,
whatever you call them!)

Make a well in the center, then dump the water into the well and stir until
blended (not disolved yet.)

Next, turn the heat up to high. Stirring frequently until you see it start
to clear a little with a light foam on top. Once you see this, you want to
stir it constantly. It will go from simmer to rapid boil almost instantly
when it's ready to go. Continue to stir, being careful to NOT GET ANY ON
YOU! It will take your skin off, it's very HOT!

With a metal spoon you should see through the simple syrup just like water,
it will be clear. You will know you are done when this happens. (It will be
at a hard boil when this happens.)

You should already have your ball jars clean and ready to go. I place mine
in a tin tray in the sink and fill the tray half way up w/ water. I place a
wide mouth funnel inside the jars and take the boiling hot simple syrup and
CAREFULLY fill the ball jars. Use your mitten and put the lids and rings on
the jars and tighten them up. Turn the cold water on them and allow it to
run in the tray. The process of the water cooling down the simple syrup
will cause a vacuum in the jars and you will hear a "POP!". This will seal
your ball jars and by the morning they will be cool and ready for you to
handle. This simple syrup will stay good indefinitely.

This is how I make simple syrup. Another tool in the toolbox.

1 sugar.jpg

2 our 2 to 1 ratio.jpg

3 dump water into well.jpg

4 stir frequently not yet dissolved.jpg

5 put jars in sink.jpg

6 it will boil and clear.jpg

7 hard boil.jpg

8 carefully fill jars.jpg

9 all filled.jpg

10 add lids and tighten.jpg
 
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joeswine

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Simple syrup

How I use it, the main purpose of simple syrup in the way I use it are twofold first in the primary adding simple syrup in a liquid format raises the specific gravity of the wine, this helps overcome some of the party kits sweetness and lack of alcohol become defined that most F pack can handle their own flavor package ,but simply lack alcohol, with the flavor you get the wine from the fermentation after all is not drink wine for.


Simple syrup, it also you be used as a back sweetening agent, at the end of fermentation and prior to bottling the proper amount of chemicals communalization to stop re-fermentation. It can also lend a finishing touch , or smoothing effect in some circumstances. Simple syrup as I make it is a2 to 1 mix.. Go back and review how I did it. Nubees you should always have simple syrup prepared in your toolbox. I am assuming forecourts of the time always have on hand.............:i
 

joeswine

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Review

GO BACK AND REVIEW THE SIMPLE SYURP
PROCESS.........:u
 

thunder

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I just finished a white wine kit and don't like the taste it taste like vinegar
I did ever thing right.Should i ad zest at this stage
thanks Bob.
 

CoastalEmpireWine

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Joeswine, I made an apple wine before I left for deployment to Afghanistan (roughly 8.5 months ago). My wife tried a little sample of it about 2 weeks ago and said that it turned out really good but with not much of an apple taste to it. She added Old Orchard apple juice concentrate for a f-pack. No sugar has been added yet. She wants to wait til I get home. Do you think it would benefit more by adding your simple syrup recipe or grain sugar? Also, I was looking into the idea of adding some zest to it. What citrus zest would complement the apple wine the most? After figuring this out I plan to run this wine through my Buon Mini Jet Filter.I also just purchased a Vinmetrica SC-300 which I plan to test all the factors.

Bulk age.jpg

Apple wine in glass.jpg
 

joeswine

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Coastal

The base wine looks great, she added the concentrate this in it's own self should have given the apple wine a flavor boost, let's go backward for a moment and review what your making ,in my oppion APPLE WINE, is a flavor unto it's self, nothing but the sweet to tart taste of APPLES.GOT IT!.....with that in mind lets move forward, the color looks great, but you stated not much on flavor ,we added the concentrate ,that's the first step, let it set for a week and then we can proceed down the wine trail don't go any farther at this op-pion,would like to work with you on this one, if that's OK........:HB
 

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