What's in my wine?

Discussion in 'Forum Comments, Suggestions & Help' started by Radman68, Apr 30, 2016.

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  1. Radman68

    Radman68 Junior

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    ImageUploadedByWine Making1461983328.694769.jpg

    This is a pear wine I made last year. I racked it several times, stored it in a carboy for a few weeks after my last racking. I back sweetened it and added potassium Sorbate. I bottled it and left it alone until I recently noticed this (see pic). What can this sediment be? Surely not lees as I racked it a few times after secondary fermentation.
     
  2. PhilDarby

    PhilDarby Member

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    If that's the bottom of the container I would guess either pear particles or yeast dropping out of suspension, due to colour im going to guess its probably pear, if it smells and tastes ok, I wouldn't worry about it and would drink it anyway, if you fancy racking again, it might help. Wines can drop sediment for prolonged periods of time and to me that doesn't look a significant amount.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2016
  3. Smokin_Paul

    Smokin_Paul Junior

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    Even if you take out all the gunk the tiny chains of chemicals/molecules in the wine can connect and form longer chains that eventually get big enough to drop out of suspension. Things precipitate out on their own time.

    If it tastes good it is good. If it tastes bad, well then you might have a problem.
     
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  4. barbiek

    barbiek barbiek

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    When last year did you make it? I make fresh pear all the time and leave it in carboy, racking every 3 mos and adding k meta. At 9 mos it's amazingly clear and it has came around pretty much so I sorbate and add sweetener if needed. I then let it sit another 6 mos before Bottleing adding kmeta to it every 3 mos I found that making fresh pear and racking every 3 months you still get a thin layer of sediment at about a year. Did you add k meta to it at every racking? And you mentioned you back sweetened and added sorbate hopefully you added the sorbate befor you sweetened? Hope this helps with your next batch!:ib
     
  5. Radman68

    Radman68 Junior

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    Thanks everyone. Barbiek, this helps and confuses me a little. I always add potassium Sorbate at the same time I sweeten. Does this matter? If so, how long before I should add it before I backsweeten? I usually bottle within 4 months. I guess I need to learn more patience. Clearing agents are a new thing to me and I just used some on a muscadine wine I just made. I will start using them every time though.
     
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  6. barbiek

    barbiek barbiek

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    Yes the clearing agents work great but still keep the rackings going. I don't use the clearing agent mostly cuz time and rackings take care of all sediment. As far as the sorbate goes I don't usually back sweeten my wine and the kit manufacter have you add it and stir it in then proceed to add sweetener. But when I sweetened homemade wine I waited 24 hrs to add sweetener after adding sorbate. Just as a precaution. I had read it years ago. Don't ask me where lol But just to ensure there's no yeast activity going on. Cheers
     
  7. hounddawg

    hounddawg dawg

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    PEAR IS A BUGGER, I age mine at least 2 years, toward the end I run it thru a 1 micron filter using vaccumpumpmans ALLINONGVACCUMPUMP.COM
    ALSO WENT I FERMENT MY PEAR I START BY USING PEAR PECTIN IN MY FERMITTING BARREL. MY KNLOGNEGE IS LIMITED BUT PEAR TAKES LONGER THEN READS, 2 YEAR MINUMUM BLUK AGING TIME. YOU WANT A QUICK DRINKER WHILE WAITING FOR YOUR PEAR, GO TO DALLOR STORE BUY CHEEP APPLE JUICE, IT WILL BE YOUR QUICKEST DRINKER THAT I KNOW OF, BUT PEARS AND REDS TAKE MUCH TIME SAME AS YOUR REDS,,, BUT I CAN TELL YOU THIS TWO YEARS ARE WELL WORTH THE WAIT,,,
    DAWG::
    RICHARD::




     
  8. Elizabeth G.

    Elizabeth G. Junior

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    There can be two main reasons of pear sediment in your wine. The first is that it’s just present during most of a wine’s life. Dead yeast cells, bits of pears, tartrates and polymers settle to the bottom of a tank or barrel. I know that some winemakers like to remove most traces of this sediment before bottling. On the other hand, leaving sediment adds to both the flavor and texture of a wine. I’m guessing the wine you had wasn’t filtered or fined on purpose.
    The second reason for sediment is that it’s a byproduct of aging. As a wine ages, phenolic molecules combine to form tannin polymers that fall to the bottom of the bottle. I generally start thinking about sediment with wines about 10 years older than their vintage date, so I’m not surprised to hear about your wine with marked sediment if it is old enough let's say. What's the age of your wine, by the way?
    After all, I think that the reason of your sediment is connected with the pear consistency. From my own experience, I once received the wine gift from one gift delivery company (It was DrinkableGifts.com, it seems to me) and the wine they offered had sediments-though basing on the sort of grape for the wine, no sediment was supposed to be there. However, as I discovered after that, the wine was 11-12-year-old so I didn't hesitate to drink it. Perhaps, the taste will explain the reason for that greenish sediment in your wine.
     

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