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winemaker81

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I eventually looked up what the word meant, simply that it featured paprika.
The Wikipedia page is informative. Spanish and Portuguese chorizo is made with chopped pork and smoke paprika, and can be hot or sweet, depending on the paprika. Mexican chorizo is made with a native pepper and ground pork. Other places make it differently, so the point of origin is important.

If looking for Spanish chorizo, try Puerto Rican, which is supposedly similar.
 

ibglowin

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You can find at least half a dozen varieties of chorizo in the grocery stores in NM. They are of course all Mexican chorizo and very spicy. They are all made from the crappiest cuts of beef or pork (yes you have a choice)! It is also 85% fat. Last time I bought some and cooked it up to add into eggs for a breakfast burrito when it was cooked there was only a couple ounces of meat in the pan and the rest was red fat. Makes for a tasty BB but it is not good for your arteries by any means!

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sour_grapes

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The Wikipedia page is informative. Spanish and Portuguese chorizo is made with chopped pork and smoke paprika, and can be hot or sweet, depending on the paprika. Mexican chorizo is made with a native pepper and ground pork. Other places make it differently, so the point of origin is important.

If looking for Spanish chorizo, try Puerto Rican, which is supposedly similar.
Ahh, yes. Thanks for that link. Another key difference that page pointed out is that the chorizos from Iberia (at least the ones that I am familiar with) are smoked and ready-to-eat, while the Mexican ones I encounter are uncooked. It seems so obvious now, but I hadn't put that together.
 

winemaker81

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Ahh, yes. Thanks for that link. Another key difference that page pointed out is that the chorizos from Iberia (at least the ones that I am familiar with) are smoked and ready-to-eat, while the Mexican ones I encounter are uncooked. It seems so obvious now, but I hadn't put that together.
I had to look up a recipe for Spanish chorizo. The smoking process requires things I don't have, as I was not familiar with "cold smoking". This site has a lot of information regarding making sausages and I'll be reading through it.

I've made Italian and breakfast sausages from venison and pork. Spanish chorizo will be a new adventure.
 

heatherd

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My understanding is that chorizo indicates that the sausage is made with paprika. (I am typing all of this deliberately from memory, with no googling.) I was always confused why I would LOVE some chorizo, and then not like a different version. Usually I loved chorizo orginating on the Iberian peninsula, but not so fond of Mexican dishes made with chorizo. I eventually looked up what the word meant, simply that it featured paprika. It seemed to me that Mexican chorizo had a sweetness that I find off-putting, but Iberian chorizo is just savory.
In South Texas there are often chorizo and queso blanco dip or chorizo and egg breakfast tacos. It a spicy, uncooked, ground sausage. I didn't find it to be sweet at all.
 

sour_grapes

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In South Texas there are often chorizo and queso blanco dip or chorizo and egg breakfast tacos. It a spicy, uncooked, ground sausage. I didn't find it to be sweet at all.
Yes, I am sure you are right. Now that I have a better handle on how broad the term chorizo is, I now suspect that there are significant regional differences between versions.

Imagine a bunch of Mandarin-speaking people puzzling over what exactly is meant by the term sausage. :)
 

SLM

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Imagine a bunch of Mandarin-speaking people puzzling over what exactly is meant by the term sausage. :)
Quite similar to wine. The uneducated may speak of wine in broad terms but they are generally not aware, as we all are, that there are actually two types of wine, red and white.
 
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