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Kraffty

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While not the classic color and look I have to say this was about the best brisket I've ever cooked. Cut with a fork but not falling apart, fat melted and tasty. Only paired with Mac and cheese and a cab. Approx 10 hours in the smoker on chucks of hickory then a couple of hours at 350 on the gas grill wrapped in foil.
IMG_8924.jpeg
 

geek

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Wanting to cook a brisket really bad....love the point.
 

Ivywoods

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1 lb of pinto beans. Cook separately in plenty of water (my disclaimer is I don't measure much when I'm cooking)
after they have softened add up to 1/2 lb cooked bacon, half pound of chopped ham, and other pork is okay depending on what you have on hand. I used some polish sausage I had in the fridge, 1 medium onion chopped, 3 or 4 cloves of pressed garlic cloves, teaspoon each salt, pepper, chili pepper and cumin, maybe a half teaspoon of oregano. Let that simmer together with the beans. Add jalapenos to your own taste along with a couple fresh tomatoes or a can of diced tomatoes. I use a quart of my home canned tomatoes. At the end add some cilantro to your own taste. It should be in a soup form. You can also add beef or chicken broth to the beans while they are cooking.
 

ibglowin

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Looks like you added ham and sausage in the pic?

1 lb of pinto beans. Cook separately in plenty of water (my disclaimer is I don't measure much when I'm cooking)
after they have softened add up to 1/2 lb cooked bacon, half pound of chopped ham, and other pork is okay depending on what you have on hand. I used some polish sausage I had in the fridge, 1 medium onion chopped, 3 or 4 cloves of pressed garlic cloves, teaspoon each salt, pepper, chili pepper and cumin, maybe a half teaspoon of oregano. Let that simmer together with the beans. Add jalapenos to your own taste along with a couple fresh tomatoes or a can of diced tomatoes. I use a quart of my home canned tomatoes. At the end add some cilantro to your own taste. It should be in a soup form. You can also add beef or chicken broth to the beans while they are cooking.
 

Ivywoods

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ibglowin-yes ham and some polish sausage I had on hand. You can use a variety of pork in it but don't skip the bacon. I don't follow an exact recipe-kind of like some winemakers ad-lib their batches. In the authentic recipe it uses something called "chorizo" I think. It's a pork product but I don't have any and have never looked for it.
 

winemaker81

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I don't follow an exact recipe-kind of like some winemakers ad-lib their batches. In the authentic recipe it uses something called "chorizo" I think. It's a pork product but I don't have any and have never looked for it.
Ditto. When I write down a recipe, it's what I did at that time. I don't necessarily measure and may substitute ingredients, so I don't often exactly repeat a dish. But no one complains! ;)

Chorizo is a spicy sausage. I thought it was Mexican, but it originated in Spain/Portugal, so there are apparently numerous variations.
 

sour_grapes

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Ditto. When I write down a recipe, it's what I did at that time. I don't necessarily measure and may substitute ingredients, so I don't often exactly repeat a dish. But no one complains! ;)

Chorizo is a spicy sausage. I thought it was Mexican, but it originated in Spain/Portugal, so there are apparently numerous variations.
My understanding is that chorizo indicates that the sausage is made with paprika. (I am typing all of this deliberately from memory, with no googling.) I was always confused why I would LOVE some chorizo, and then not like a different version. Usually I loved chorizo orginating on the Iberian peninsula, but not so fond of Mexican dishes made with chorizo. I eventually looked up what the word meant, simply that it featured paprika. It seemed to me that Mexican chorizo had a sweetness that I find off-putting, but Iberian chorizo is just savory.
 

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