What to do after the first Fermentation?

Discussion in 'Beginners Wine Making Forum' started by JoerassicPark, Mar 23, 2019.

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  1. Mar 23, 2019 #1

    JoerassicPark

    JoerassicPark

    JoerassicPark

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    I am looking to start producing my own wine from grape juice to start. I have done lots of research and only have a few questions before starting. After the first fermentation (5-7 days) and the yeast begins to die and settle. Should I pour the wine into a new container to remove the dead yeast or should I just leave it there for the second fermentation. Also, I read that certain yeasts die in cold temperatures. How do I store the wine during the weeks it is fermenting to prevent spoilage. After the fermentation should I then store it in the fridge? These are probably basic questions, however, I have never done this before and really look forward to the experience! Thank you for the help and if you have any tips for me prior to starting please let me know!
     
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  2. Mar 23, 2019 #2

    mainshipfred

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    When you refer to grape juice are you refering to kits, processed wine grape juice buckets or store bought something like Welch's? I'll try not to complicate it so fermentation should not be measured by time but rather Hydrometer readings. This varies from person to person. Some rack at 1.002 and some below 1.000. I personally let it go dry at below 1.000. The yeast doesn't necessarily die, it just goes dormant when all the sugar is used up. If you add sugar after the wine goes dry it will start to ferment again. 2nd fermentation is a misnomer, in the kit world it refers to racking the wine once you reach the 1.002 or lower number. With grapes and juice buckets it refers to malolactic fermentation. So if you are doing MLF you want to leave most of the lees otherwise you can rack it as clean as possible. Temperature is relative and depends on the yeast. With whites and depending on the yeast you want to ferment around the 50 degrees, reds 70-80 as a general rule. This will be the must temperature not the ambient since the temperature of wine is warmer then the ambient once fermentation starts. Read the information on your selected yeast for recommended temperature ranges. During fermentation your wine will be protected by the CO2 cap given off by the process. Once it is finished you will want to keep it topped up to minimize O2 exposure to the wine. It is thought higher temps will age the wine faster but 55-60 is probably preferred. What ever way you decide to go just make sure the temperature is constant. Other may think differently, good luck!

    Edit, Typo on the gravity numbers 1.002 should have been 1.020
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2019
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  3. Mar 23, 2019 #3

    cmason1957

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    There are some excellant articles you might think about reading on the Morewinemaking.com site. They give somewhat step by step guides to how to make wine. I suggest them to everyone and refer back to them myself. And when you have questions ask here on this forum, we are all glad to offer our two cents of knowledge for free.
     
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  4. Mar 23, 2019 #4

    tradowsk

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    A good way to start is with Welch's grape juice since it's cheap and preservative free. My first batch of wine ever was with welch's sangria blend. It turned out good, nothing spectacular, but it allowed me to get the hang of winemaking and the whole process with minimal risk.
     
  5. Mar 24, 2019 #5

    JoerassicPark

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    Thanks, that's how I intended to start myself and I was going to use Red Star Premier Rouge Dry Wine Yeast with the Welch's. Are there any other good juices I could use for other flavors?
     
  6. Mar 24, 2019 #6

    tradowsk

    tradowsk

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    Trader Joe's has a good selection of preservative-free fruit juices. Pretty much anything the doesn't have any sulfite or potassium sorbate listed on the ingredients can be used easily. One thing you can the to bump up the flavor is add a can of welch's grape juice concentrate. That will give it more flavor than what normal juice can do for you.

    But I think the grocery store juices should only be for your first (and maybe second) batch. After you get the hang of it, I would recommend a good wine kit or some fresh fruit. You will have much better results with those.
     

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