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What fruit or berry plant can grow good in zone 8A?

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ed71

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Guys, I live in Virginia Beach, Virginia. I dont have massive land to grow massive amounts of fruit to make more than10 gallons of country wine. Sometimes I use frozen concentrate, flower petals, etc. All mostly having to add regular sugar to bring ABV up without reling on the fruits own natural juice.

Recently, My only tree was a crab apple tree which for several years I relied on making "crabapple wine" (had to add sugar of course since its not high in sugar)

However, its been attacked by bore worms and the tree is on its last leg. (have to cut it down eventually)

My question is, are there any other kinds of fruit trees that are resistant to "bore worms" in zone 8A that I can turn into wine? Sugar content is not a concern since I most likely would be adding sugar since I dont have the high numbers to make it naturally.

Ive got a fig tree planted, and that is doing good and doesnt seem to be effected by bore worms. But, I dont like fig wine. (well, Ive never heard or even tried it,....is there such a thing?)

I once had a peach tree in the back yard, but that too became sick and got bore worms also. It seems my whole neighborhood is effected. I assume its the soil or being in proximity to neighbors who dont take care of their own trees.

Anyone got any ideas on strong resistant trees that give fruit or berries?
 

winehomie

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I have read that dwarf cherry trees thrive in zone 8 and a also bore worm resistant, you can get them in sweet or tart, I am partial to tart myself but to each there own, and I love tart cherry wine, one of the best fruit wines out there IMHO.
 

terrymck

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Blackberries and blueberries will grow fine there. Get either rabbit eye or highbush blueberry bushes and any black berry with an indian name.
 

TonyR

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Many years ago I was stationed in Norfolk during my time in the Navy. I remember seeing a lot of Persimmon trees. They have lot of fruit that can be used for wine. Good luck. Find a local nursery, they will have everything there and know what will grow the best.
 
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Scooter68

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Only problem with fruit trees, unless you spend the money for a large one, they will take several years (4-6 at least) before they produce enough to make a decent batch of wine. Blueberries (Buy the largest plants you can find (NOT bare root) - it's worth the money) or Blackberries will be producing within 2-3 years if you buy big enough plants. I've bought most of mine at a Lowe's garden center and I buy the biggest they have (Under $25.00 each) and they are huge and producing well in 2 years time. Do take a little time to learn about the best plants in terms of the berry sizes, qty, and flavor. I have one awesome producing plant but the berries are very small and ripen over about a 6 week time. The plant drives me nuts. They are very sweet but my patience wears thin every year.
 

ed71

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Thanks guys, I actually learned something about plants. Had totally forgotten one could simply buy the grown plant somewhere and simply transplant them. (hoping they would take root and not die)

Persimmon tree, blackberry, and dwarf cherry trees I will definitely look up. Ive tried to plant blueberries but I was not impressed. But then again, I planted the blueberry from nursery and not from a larger bush already grown.

Dont get me wrong, I know that suburban areas are not places to grow high quality fruits bearing tons of sugar content. Ive come to realize for non farmers or low fruit yields areas, wine is based only for the "flavor" and not ABV content.
 

ed71

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Wait, I was wrong about the last part. I had a friend with a massive golden apple tree which was never affected by the apple variety of "bore worms" and is still doing good to this day.

He told me that it was in his family home for 3 generations and that his grandma had pruned and sprayed the tree every year for "bore worm" protection.

I had asked him once about it seeing it was nearly 20 ft tall and had good solid golden apples and had mentioned to him he could make cider out of it. After hearing my interest, he jacked the price up for buying them. Lol!
 

Scooter68

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Blueberries have on requirement that you HAVE to meet. The soil must be acidic - Between 4.5 and 5.5 or the plants will die. The vast majority of issues with blueberries all come back to that problem. Fix the soil and you will have no problems. They are low maintenance plants. We use pine needle mulch (Lots in your area) and coffee grounds get spread there as well. Fertilizing with azalea or other acidic plant fertilizer. Sulfur chips etc. Plenty of ways to get the soil right. Start now on the soil for next springs planting. Plants in pots with plenty of soil there do better because the soil their roots are in now is already correct. That give your soil adjustments time to work in better.

Pardon the gardening lesson. I've got 30 blueberry bushes in 2 patches and every time I've had an issue it comes back to soil not right.
 

Stressbaby

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Agree with Scooter on that. If your soil isn't acidic, you will have a lot of work to do to grow blueberries.
 

ed71

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Hmmmm, thats probably why my tiny tiny little blueberry bush didnt seem to grow at all. I was so unimpressed by it, I just forgot all about it.

It gives blueberries, but hasnt grown much bigger than 4 feet within 4 years.
 

TonyR

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I have blueberry bushes that are 20 years old, about 7 ft tall. For me it took a good 10 years after planting them to start getting berries. Now i get gallons of berries and have always had very acidic soil. I had fruit on my apple and pear trees I planted before the blueberries.
 

Scooter68

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Hmmmm, thats probably why my tiny tiny little blueberry bush didnt seem to grow at all. I was so unimpressed by it, I just forgot all about it.

It gives blueberries, but hasnt grown much bigger than 4 feet within 4 years.
Mu bushes are about 4 - 4.5 feet tall. Height as well as how well they produce depends on a lot of things. Late freezes have killed one years crop, this years was weak but not terrible. You have to dedicate enough area for the roots to spread as well. Like any plant the soil as well as the variety dictate how well they will do. I buy sulfur chips in 20lb bags and spread them every other year at least. I've lost some plants but most were because either I didn't water them enough during dry spells or I bought too small or bare root plants. The latter have to have perfect soil to get started. That's why I've just bitten the bullet and gone for 2 gallon or larger plants.

The key is that after you get them established there are very few bugs that bother them and maintenance is very easy. Water, Fertilize, pick, then prune in winter, repeat. IF japanese beetles hit (usually late in the picking season) a little neem oil solves that.

OH - Almost forgot - There is competition - Birds and Deer. I use netting which is a pain but have that down to routine now. (Birds hate me and tell me so when they see me go pick.) Of course nothings better than free wild blackberries and black raspberries.
 

Venatorscribe

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If you spray with 'lime sulphur' and Neem Oil, you'll inhibit any of these nasty bugs. Both products are natural biological / organic. I bought a house four years ago with a sick looking pear tree in the back yard. I've nursed the tree back into some form of health using the above products. And it rewards me by producing 70 kg of pears every year, forming the base for some lovely hard cider.
 

WAC4504

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You might also try strawberries, but keep in mind that they will reproduce and spread like crazy. The #1 problem I would have with them was slugs, but a jar lid with beer in it worked wonders on them. I also recommend blueberries, as the others have, they are maintenance free and will surprise you as to just how much they can produce. I have 2 mature bushes and 2 young bushes (that I don't count), that put out about 7 gallons of berries. Good luck.
 

gratus_fermentatio

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Guys, I live in Virginia Beach, Virginia. I dont have massive land to grow massive amounts of fruit to make more than10 gallons of country wine. Sometimes I use frozen concentrate, flower petals, etc. All mostly having to add regular sugar to bring ABV up without reling on the fruits own natural juice.

Recently, My only tree was a crab apple tree which for several years I relied on making "crabapple wine" (had to add sugar of course since its not high in sugar)

However, its been attacked by bore worms and the tree is on its last leg. (have to cut it down eventually)

My question is, are there any other kinds of fruit trees that are resistant to "bore worms" in zone 8A that I can turn into wine? Sugar content is not a concern since I most likely would be adding sugar since I dont have the high numbers to make it naturally.

Ive got a fig tree planted, and that is doing good and doesnt seem to be effected by bore worms. But, I dont like fig wine. (well, Ive never heard or even tried it,....is there such a thing?)

I once had a peach tree in the back yard, but that too became sick and got bore worms also. It seems my whole neighborhood is effected. I assume its the soil or being in proximity to neighbors who dont take care of their own trees.

Anyone got any ideas on strong resistant trees that give fruit or berries?
Not sure about "resistant" fruit trees, but you might find this useful:
http://extension.missouri.edu/p/g7190
Regards, GF.
 

WAC4504

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I don't know if you have found a solution to you problem, but I got to thinking about my pomegranate bush, and how to block the wind. If we have a mild summer with few sever thunder storms I can get 20+ pomegranates off the bush, the size of softballs or bigger. You may want to look into that option, just block the wind. By the way they are very adaptable to any soil and are self pollinating. Just a thought.
 

hounddawg

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first my heart hurts for you, beings i only do country wines i use crabapples instead of grape tannings, not as a wine but to give a killer finish to your wines, way better taste in my book, try some sergeants crab apple bushes either red or yellow i use yellow, 2nd look into haskaps from Alaska good to my zone 10A also known as honey berries, elderberries forget the whites and blues get some native blacks, reds are poison, wild blackberries, during blackberry season look some have small berries with small beads not that flavorful, look for black berries with big bunches with big beads, i notice i have two types with big beads with the big berry with big beads check one is watery no go, the other is flavorful with a good finish when you eat them raw as will your blackberry wines be, i have several tame blackberries i don't care for them for wine, triple crown , Arkansas freedom 45, and a couple others i leave them for the deer squirrels rabbits an so on. , i have trouble keeping any wild blackberry wines for my way to many friends and so called family, lol.
persimmons work as well. I've been in your neck of the woods many times in my younger days, you can grow more then you can handle on a small plot of land, come spring drive down roads that go beside train tracks look for white flower blossoms that look like umbrellas the bark will look funny with tiny black spots the leaves will have a long stem with leaves coming out each side of the stem, and later when the berries come on the stems the berries are on will turn kinda red and still look kinda like umbrellas these are elderberries, and you should do well with blueberries as well. and that's just for starters ,,
i wish you the best of luck,
Dawg








Guys, I live in Virginia Beach, Virginia. I dont have massive land to grow massive amounts of fruit to make more than10 gallons of country wine. Sometimes I use frozen concentrate, flower petals, etc. All mostly having to add regular sugar to bring ABV up without reling on the fruits own natural juice.

Recently, My only tree was a crab apple tree which for several years I relied on making "crabapple wine" (had to add sugar of course since its not high in sugar)

However, its been attacked by bore worms and the tree is on its last leg. (have to cut it down eventually)

My question is, are there any other kinds of fruit trees that are resistant to "bore worms" in zone 8A that I can turn into wine? Sugar content is not a concern since I most likely would be adding sugar since I dont have the high numbers to make it naturally.

Ive got a fig tree planted, and that is doing good and doesnt seem to be effected by bore worms. But, I dont like fig wine. (well, Ive never heard or even tried it,....is there such a thing?)

I once had a peach tree in the back yard, but that too became sick and got bore worms also. It seems my whole neighborhood is effected. I assume its the soil or being in proximity to neighbors who dont take care of their own trees.

Anyone got any ideas on strong resistant trees that give fruit or berries?
 

hounddawg

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i find your organic cure extremely interesting, i will keep this in mind.
thank you
Dawg




If you spray with 'lime sulphur' and Neem Oil, you'll inhibit any of these nasty bugs. Both products are natural biological / organic. I bought a house four years ago with a sick looking pear tree in the back yard. I've nursed the tree back into some form of health using the above products. And it rewards me by producing 70 kg of pears every year, forming the base for some lovely hard cider.
 

hounddawg

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so if i dig up just one big one will you shoot me,
have shovel,, will travel...LOL
Dawg




o
I have blueberry bushes that are 20 years old, about 7 ft tall. For me it took a good 10 years after planting them to start getting berries. Now i get gallons of berries and have always had very acidic soil. I had fruit on my apple and pear trees I planted before the blueberries.
 
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