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ThreeSheetsToTheWind

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I've got a chardonnay kit going . I followed the instructions for primary, and in secondary, I added 16 ounces of dried apricots that I had rinsed, then covered with water. I boiled them then added then to the carboy inside a cleaned and sanitized nylon stocking. About two weeks, after fermentation died down and the wine started to clear, I stole a sample.

It smells and tastes exactly like a house fire. Burnt vinyl siding to be exact. At first I thought the grapes might actually have been picked after a huge fire had raged nearby.

But another identical kit that came in the same box ( these kits come two to a box) sans apricots in secondary tastes great for its age.

I suspect mercaptans, but I've never dealt with these before so not sure. The smell and taste seems to dissipate with time in the glass, and a copper penny ( impeccably cleaned with vinegar to a nice bright shine) may have helped as well.

I'm open to any advice, input or words of wisdom you guys might have. If I can fix this, great, but I'm not drinking something that tastes like it was literally filtered through the ashes of a house fire

Have any of you dealt with this and what have you done about it?
 

salcoco

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I would guess the apricots were heavily sulphited and the burn match you sense is from them. I would splash rack and see if it helps. also a bench trial with hydrogen peroxide might do some good. other wise wait patiently it will dissipate.
 

ThreeSheetsToTheWind

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I would guess the apricots were heavily sulphited and the burn match you sense is from them. I would splash rack and see if it helps. also a bench trial with hydrogen peroxide might do some good. other wise wait patiently it will dissipate.
I did a few Google searches for removal of mercaptans using hydrogen peroxide and came up with very little information.

Could you explain the process, or point the way to some reading material please?
 

Ajmassa

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I did a few Google searches for removal of mercaptans using hydrogen peroxide and came up with very little information.

Could you explain the process, or point the way to some reading material please?
There’s a product sold to remove the sulphites from your wine. Small bottle. Something like 3-4 drops per glass of wine

There’s actually 2 very similar products. One removes the sulphites and the other removes the sulphites and the tannins somehow. (For the headaches) The main active ingredient in both is hydrogen peroxide. I’m totally spacing on the names of them tho. One of em was something tacky like “Sulphite-B-Gone”
 

ThreeSheetsToTheWind

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Ok so were talking about a few drops peroxide/glass then? I'll give it a try later when I rack.

Mixing up a batch of mead right now. Off to learn about staggered nutrient additions
 

Ajmassa

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Ok so were talking about a few drops peroxide/glass then? I'll give it a try later when I rack.

Mixing up a batch of mead right now. Off to learn about staggered nutrient additions
I didn’t mean to suggest doing that. I’ve got zero experience with that.
Was just passing along info.

If the copper helped then a you could try a product called Reduless. Helps you remove some nasty smells while having some control over the amount of copper your adding
 

ThreeSheetsToTheWind

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Seriously though 3 drops in a couple ounces of wine brought the smell and taste down considerably, but also left a new, unpleasant flavor that wasn't there before, and I can't really put my finger on what it tastes like.

Almost a metallic sort of taste.

I did rack it and let the wine flow down the neck of the carboy and do that cool thing where it coats the walls of the carboy. I figured that would expose it to more air. There was a strong smell coming from the mouth of the carboy as I was doing this. Going to give it some time now, see what happens.

This is like being a kid again and getting a chemistry set for christmas, but with booze lol.
 

Rice_Guy

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Seriously though 3 drops in a couple ounces of wine brought the smell and taste down considerably, but also left a new, unpleasant flavor that wasn't there before, and I can't really put my finger on what it tastes like.

Almost a metallic sort of taste.
lol.
If you used drug store peroxide, it is stabilized in a solution of sodium hydroxide. Yes it does have a unique flavor.:s Sodium is a metal.
There also is an industrial version at 85 or 90% peroxide, but you probably couldn’t buy it.
 

LouisCKpasteur

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I could be wrong, but I'm pretty sure there's more sulphite in one apricot than there is in a bottle of wine.
 

G259

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Lol, see my 'Apricot wine' thread! I have been fighting with it, and am near the 'dump/save' point- One Last Attempt!
 

Swedeman

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I'm surprised since soaking and boiling the fruit is an effective way of removing sulphite. I have used dried apricots (in beer), but I used organic ones since they are not preserved with sulphite.
 

ThreeSheetsToTheWind

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Yeah, I bought them in bulk and the only ingredient listed was dried apricots. Not likely lol. Either way, I dont think I'll be using apricots in any future brews.

Live and learn I guess
 

Chuck E

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I've got a chardonnay kit going . I followed the instructions for primary, and in secondary, I added 16 ounces of dried apricots that I had rinsed, then covered with water. I boiled them then added then to the carboy inside a cleaned and sanitized nylon stocking. About two weeks, after fermentation died down and the wine started to clear, I stole a sample.

It smells and tastes exactly like a house fire. Burnt vinyl siding to be exact. At first I thought the grapes might actually have been picked after a huge fire had raged nearby.

But another identical kit that came in the same box ( these kits come two to a box) sans apricots in secondary tastes great for its age.

I suspect mercaptans, but I've never dealt with these before so not sure. The smell and taste seems to dissipate with time in the glass, and a copper penny ( impeccably cleaned with vinegar to a nice bright shine) may have helped as well.

I'm open to any advice, input or words of wisdom you guys might have. If I can fix this, great, but I'm not drinking something that tastes like it was literally filtered through the ashes of a house fire

Have any of you dealt with this and what have you done about it?
Did you try pumping through a copper scrubbing pad? Also MoreWine has a kit to remove H2S
 

LouisCKpasteur

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Pretty sure there is a threshold at which they have to list sulphur content on the label for even organic apricots. Dried apricots and raisons are raisons are typically high in sulfites. I know a guy who likes to debunk people claiming sulfite sensitivity by asking if they eat dried fruit if they try to blame their hangover on the wine, because it's going to contain more than the wine typically.
 

sour_grapes

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Did you try pumping through a copper scrubbing pad? Also MoreWine has a kit to remove H2S
I think you are confusing sulfides (like H2S) and sulfites (k-meta).

Edit: see next messages. I missed/forgot the earlier info about copper.
 
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