Quantcast

Using Frozen Fruit?

Wine Making Talk

Help Support Wine Making Talk:

arcticsid

Arctic Contributor
Joined
Oct 26, 2008
Messages
4,203
Reaction score
57
Are there any general ideas on using frozen fruit? As you can well imagine, fresh fruit can be outrageously expensive here, especially berries. Has anyone else had any successes, or failures using frozen?
Troy
 

Wade E

Premium
Joined
Jul 3, 2006
Messages
33,224
Reaction score
268
Frozen fruit is fine and sometimes better then grocery store fruit as they are typically picked too early so as not to rot before they hit the stands and never develope all the sugar and flavor that a wine really needs to overpower an abv. Even if you buy fresh fruit you should freeze most fruits as it helps break up the cellular structure of the fruit and kets the pectic enzyme that you will add do a better job of extracting more color and flavor of the fruit.
 

jneureuther

Junior
Joined
Jan 2, 2009
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Troy, just a note on frozen fruit. I am lucky enough to have access to about 24 elderberry bushes and am able to get fresh berries. Trouble is, I'm usually too busy to make my wine right away, so I freeze the cleaned berries till I'm ready. I believe Wade is correct about the fruit breaking down easier and letting the pectic enzyme do it's job.

Jimmy
 

Wade E

Premium
Joined
Jul 3, 2006
Messages
33,224
Reaction score
268
Do this especially with crab apples, they are togh little critters to do anything with but once they have been frozen for a week and then thawed out, you can then squish them with you bare hands no problem. I use the Dolce Crab apples not the tiny nasty crab apples.
 

Luc

Dutch Winemaker
Joined
Nov 5, 2006
Messages
1,615
Reaction score
33
Troy,

I freeze nearly all my fruit.
I even freeze dandelions for making wine.

When harvesting there is not always enough time to
collect all the fruit you need.
So collect whatever you can, CLEAN IT FIRST and then freeze it.
Next you can use it whenever you want.

At this moment my winemaking freezer (yes I have
a separate one for winemaking) is full with rhubarb,
elderberries, blackberries, dandelion petals and some
apples and banana's.

Advantage is that the fruit will become meshy when it
thaws. That is, like the others said, from the cell-structures
breaking down. This is actually a good thing as it makes the
juice better available for us.

I wrote an essay on rhubarb 2 year ago and how to
process it you can find it here:
http://wijnmaker.blogspot.com/2007/06/scroll-down-for-english-text-al-lange.html

Now freezing has another advantage.
When processing hard fruit like apples or pears everyone
tells you to use a press. but a press is an expensive piece of equipment and just used a few times a year.
You can also use a freezer !!!!

I demonstrated how to process apples without expensive
equipment on my web-log:

http://wijnmaker.blogspot.com/2008/09/appeltje-voor-de-dorst-apple-day.html

So to summarise it all in one sentence:
Freezing fruit is actually one of the best things you can do.

Luc
 

arcticsid

Arctic Contributor
Joined
Oct 26, 2008
Messages
4,203
Reaction score
57
Appreciate the advice, makes perfect sense, was considering what was available at the store pre frozen, and if they should have some type fresh I will be sure to freeze it first, provided the price is reasonable. Not interested in anything in particular, open to any type, ready to graduate from concentrated juice to fruit. Shouldn't have any problem freezing it, temperatures here have been hovering around -40F, with -50F likely, and no end in sight. Thats not wind chill either, yikes!!!!!!!! Troy
 

Wine4Me

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2008
Messages
184
Reaction score
2
Luc
Thanks for the info about making juice from apples without expensive
equipment... I saved that to my PC for the future..
 

Wade E

Premium
Joined
Jul 3, 2006
Messages
33,224
Reaction score
268
When making a wine from apples or any other fruit that browns very fast like an apple use Ascorbic acid in the primary. It will not hinder your fermenation at all and it will keep your whires white and pinks pink instead of brown.
 

arcticsid

Arctic Contributor
Joined
Oct 26, 2008
Messages
4,203
Reaction score
57
While we are this discussion of frozen fruit, I was at the market today and the cheapest frozen fruit I could find was strawberries, 4 lbs. for 17$US, quess I'll be starting with fresh anyway. Seen some nice pears for like 90cents/pound, didnt get any cause I was hoping you might give me a simple recipe to make my transition to using real fruit. At 4$/lb i guess I could go anyway. is there such a thing as a fruit wine for beginners? Kinda wondering about bannanas, or cantelope, I can afford those. Any simple ideas?Thanks
for any suggestions, still would like to use a concentrate as a base. But would consider bottled juice of any kind and augment it with fresh fruit.
Troy
 

Wade E

Premium
Joined
Jul 3, 2006
Messages
33,224
Reaction score
268
Luc, I use both Ascorbic acid and K-Meta in my wines but Im pretty sure the small amount of K-meta we use to kill off wild yeasts before fermentation is not enough by itself to prevent browning!
articsid, I would stay away from melons as they are not a beginners fruit to play around with as they go bad very easy when making wine. If you want to try Bananas then here is a 6 gallon recipe, if you want to make a smaller batch then divide everything in the recipe by the size batch you want with the exception of yeast.

28 lbs – Ripe Bananas
1 tsp – Ascorbic Acid
2 – White Grape Concentrate
11 lbs – White Table Sugar
11 tsp – Acid Blend
3 tsp – Yeast Nutrient
1 ½ tsp – Yeast Energizer
5 ¾ Gallons – Water
1 Sachet Red Star Cotes Des Blanc Yeast

Pour 1 gallon of warm water in a 7.9 gallon primary bucket or bigger.
Add K-meta, Yeast Energizer, Yeast Nutrient, Grape Concentrate, and Ascorbic Acid and stir well. Put all fruit in fermenting bag and squeeze over primary to extract most of juices and then put bag in primary. Pour the 1 gallon of boiling water with all dissolved sugar over fruit. Fill the rest of the way with remainder of room temp water and check SG, it should have a SG of around 1.085 give or take a little, if more then add a little more water, if less then add a little more dissolved sugar in small amount of water as sugars from fruit can vary a little. Let sit for 12 hours with lid loose or with a cloth covering bucket with elastic band or string tied around so as that not to sag in must. After those 12 hours add your Pectic Enzyme and wait another 12 hours while also adjusting your must temp to around 75 degrees. After those twelve hours, pitch your yeast either by sprinkling yeast, dehydrating yeast per instructions on back of yeast Sachet, or by making a yeast starter a few hours prior to the 12 hour mark. At this point either leave primary lid off with the cloth again, place lid on loose or snap the lid shut. Punch down cap twice daily to get all fruit under the liquid level. When SG reaches 1.015, rack to 6 gallon carboy and let finish fermenting with bung and airlock attached. When wine is done fermenting, (check a few days in a row to make sure SG does not change and SG should be around .998 or less) you can stabilize by adding another ¼ tsp of k-meta and 3 tsps of Potassium Sorbate and degas your wine thoroughly. You can now sweeten your wine if you like by using simple syrup which consists of 2 cups of sugar and 1 cup of boiling water or by using a juice or frozen concentrate. I typically take 2 quarts of an alike juice and simmer on stove at medium heat with lid off until its 1/3 its original size and let it cool to room temp and then add slowly to taste. Be careful not to over sweeten. At this point you can use a fining agent or let it clear naturally. Once clear, rack into clean vessel and bulk age more adding another ¼ tsp of k-meta at 3 month intervals or add ¼ tsp k-meta and bottle age for at least 3 months and enjoy. Longer aging will give you a better wine so save a few bottles till at least 1 year mark so you can truly see what this wine can aspire to.
 

Wine4Me

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2008
Messages
184
Reaction score
2
Luc
I decided to try freezing apples to make juice for the first time.. I got the idea from your web site..
I used Winesap apples! I peeled, cored & cut into pieces & put into baggies and froze for about a week [oops, forgot about them] Now they are thawed and I do not see juice!!! They smashed in your hands very easily. Have a texture like applesauce with bits of apples in it.
My question; do I put them back into the freezer or???? :(
 

Wade E

Premium
Joined
Jul 3, 2006
Messages
33,224
Reaction score
268
Ferment them, you dont get lots of juice from apples ands that why youneed a lot moree apples per batch then any other fruit except grape and with grapes thats because thats all you use with most grapes.
 

Luc

Dutch Winemaker
Joined
Nov 5, 2006
Messages
1,615
Reaction score
33
Luc
My question; do I put them back into the freezer or???? :(
A week in the freezer should be more as sufficient.

Do they not give any juice when you squeeze them ???

Let them thaw, mash them with a potato masher and then try (test a bit) pressing them in a cheesecloth.

Better is to mash them and then treat them with pectic enzymes.
Then try pressing them in a cheesecloth or similar.

Luc
 

Wine4Me

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2008
Messages
184
Reaction score
2
Wade
Im not sure how you can ferment something with no juice??I mean just add water & a bag of mush??

Luc
There is NO juice at all. It is like applesauce.. I was a bit disappointed this morning because I left it sit out [covered with lid] over nite & thought maybe that would "help" juice come, but nothing!!
So I added pectic enzymes & will see what happens!!~
 

Luc

Dutch Winemaker
Joined
Nov 5, 2006
Messages
1,615
Reaction score
33
So after freezing it looked like apple-sauce.
That is a good start.

Have you tried filtering it through a cheesecloth or
something alike. I think you would see some juice forming then.

But now wait till the pectic enzymes have done their job.
Then use a cheesecloth to filter the solids out.

Luc
 

non-grapenut

Fruit Fears Me
Joined
Jan 7, 2009
Messages
400
Reaction score
4
Fruit wine for beginners...hmmm. Make small, 1-2 gallon batches of whatever's on sale, frozen, fresh or dried. If you blow it, your investment won't ouch as much. If you really like a batch, multiply it by 5 or 6 and invest...Here is a good starter for you:

http://brewsupplies.com/homemade_wine_recipes.htm
 

Conquistadude

Diabolical GENIUS!!!
Joined
Nov 16, 2008
Messages
175
Reaction score
1
I experienced this first hand. When we were doing the pomegranate wine. we stated by juicing the avrils, but didn't have the time to just them all, so we froze the half that we didn't use yet for the next day. it was in Just over night. (not even 24 hours) when we pulled them out and let them thaw out. the we noticed that the avrils were in a lot of juice, so we separated the avrils from the juice and from 1 lb of avrils we got 2 1/2 cups of pure, juice. and it was 99% pulp free, as apposed to the juices which was about 75% pulp free...so yeah...freezers baby!!! not just a place to store Ice Cream.
 

Wine4Me

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2008
Messages
184
Reaction score
2
Today. I checked the apples and there was some juice & I ran it through a seive.. Got much more juice. This is soooo neat that I am getting juice from it!!
I have never made applesauce or juice before so this all is new to me..
NOW if the wine just makes me as happy!! lol :cool:
 

Luc

Dutch Winemaker
Joined
Nov 5, 2006
Messages
1,615
Reaction score
33
Glad it turned out so well :)

(Told you so :p)

Did you measure the ratio of weight against juice.
That might give you a hint in the future about how many
apples to buy when you want to make a certain volume of wine.

Always goods to make as many notes as possible for
future use.

Luc
 
Top