Using flavored simple syrup to backsweeten...

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Ikeya

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I was wondering if it is possible to use flavored simple syrups to backsweeten wine to obviously help sweeten it, but also to help add a bit more flavor. I know Monin and Torani make fruit flavored ones that are high in sugar. I don't know if there are anything in the syrup that will hurt it, or if the artificial flavoring will make it taste bad. I tried for find forums on this but could not please help.
 

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BernardSmith

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Hi Ikeya, and welcome. An interesting question but the truth is I cannot answer it because I have never tried to add Torani syrups to my wines, but I have (and do) add them to vodka and other spirits to make liqueurs: my wife loves chocolate liqueur I make using 2 parts spirits to 1 part syrup. But that said, I cannot imagine there is anything in those syrups that will impart an unpleasant flavor though some of the fruit syrups do contain preservatives (benzoate, for example).
 

joeswine

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I would not recommend them at all, to artificial tasting after taste.
 

sour_grapes

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I was wondering if it is possible to use flavored simple syrups to backsweeten wine to obviously help sweeten it, but also to help add a bit more flavor. I know Monin and Torani make fruit flavored ones that are high in sugar. I don't know if there are anything in the syrup that will hurt it, or if the artificial flavoring will make it taste bad. I tried for find forums on this but could not please help.
The only taste buds that matter are yours (and your guests). I think that bench trials are in order. Pour a few glasses of your wine, and add different (controlled) amounts of the syrup to them. If you like 'em, then you found your answer!
 

Scooter68

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When in doubt I ALWAYS read the ingredients list.
For the Torani Blackberry syrup this is the list - Pure cane sugar, water, natural flavors, citric acid, sodium benzoate (to preserve freshness), FD&C Red #40, caramel color.
Note that it does NOT say what the "Natural Flavors" are - Blackberry ?? We don't know. Plus they add color dyes - For some wines that might not be an issue but...
As Sour Grapes says - I comes down to what you like.

I would suggest one thing though. Follow the KISS principle - The simpler the better for your wine making until you've done a few batches, aged them and consumed them. The more variable you introduce, the harder is to repeat a good result or fix a bad result.
 

Ikeya

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Thanks for all the feedback guys! I have a batch of strawberry mango wine with about 3 weeks left right now. I will experiment a little with it using flavored syrups and f-packs.
 

Rocky

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I would suggest back sweetening with simple syrup (two parts sugar fully dissolved in 1 part water) and flavoring with a natural extract (e.g. LorAnn brand). Check the ingredients on the extract you purchase. They should be natural flavor and alcohol. As Paul cautions above, do bench trials and start with a very small amount (a drop or two). I have used green apple extract in a Riesling successfully.
 

Rice_Guy

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I have seen it done and win best of class in contest, knock your Sox off flavor. In principle similar to using an F-pack.
Have not done shelf stable syrup but have done similar with frozen juice.
 

Ikeya

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I would suggest back sweetening with simple syrup (two parts sugar fully dissolved in 1 part water) and flavoring with a natural extract (e.g. LorAnn brand). Check the ingredients on the extract you purchase. They should be natural flavor and alcohol. As Paul cautions above, do bench trials and start with a very small amount (a drop or two). I have used green apple extract in a Riesling successfully.
Do you add the lorann to the simple syrup normally?
 

sour_grapes

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An F-pack is a "flavor pack" that is included in some wine kits. The idea is to add them AFTER you complete fermentation on the bulk of the wine juice. You then "stabilize" the wine (with potassium sorbate and potassium metabisulfite) to prevent further fermentation, than add the F-pack. This adds sweetness and flavor, rendering an off-dry (or even sweet) wine.
 

Rocky

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Do you add the lorann to the simple syrup normally?
In the Riesling that I made there was no simple syrup involved. However, I feel it would be safer to add it to the wine after the wine has been sweetened. It only takes a small amount. The flavor is very concentrated.
 

Rice_Guy

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The lab bench experience is the artificial flavors last at least as well as natural, they tend to have higher levels of active chemical so there is a lot of impact, and the main fault is some are one dimensional ie they have only one chemical.
I really love natural flavor extracts ex Virginia Dare since they are true to source concentrates of real crops and one can flavor a whole tank just by adding a gallon jug,,,, note Virginia Dare does not sell smaller than a gallon. I don’t know who the supplier for Torani is but if the label says “natural flavor” and its made in the US the odds are good that it is Virginia Dare.
I would be concerned that long term the taste may break down or lose potency somewhat, with those artificial things. but that's just me.
 

Rocky

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Virginia Dare! Boy does that bring back memories of my misspent youth.

 

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