Using dried fruit.

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Cosyden

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I’ve found a recipe that uses dried bilberries which I plan to start next week. I’ve found a source of organic, no sugar, no oil fruit so that should avoid most of the problems I’ve read about, but is there any other issues to consider using dried over fresh/frozen fruit?
The recipe suggests you can take a second and third brew off the fruit giving a total of about 50 ltrs off 2kg or dried berries. Has anyone got experience of taking additional brews off one batch of fruit? What’s your experience?
Thanks.
 

Gilmango

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I’ve found a recipe that uses dried bilberries which I plan to start next week. I’ve found a source of organic, no sugar, no oil fruit so that should avoid most of the problems I’ve read about, but is there any other issues to consider using dried over fresh/frozen fruit?
The recipe suggests you can take a second and third brew off the fruit giving a total of about 50 ltrs off 2kg or dried berries. Has anyone got experience of taking additional brews off one batch of fruit? What’s your experience?
Thanks.
I guess I am kind of dubious about the 2nd and especially 3rd runs off of dried fruit, sounds more like sugar wine (prison hooch) to me. By which I mean it is probably fine to use them without issues, but if you do not have any other new fruit or juice then I don't think you will get too much out of 2nd (or 3rd) use.

I have definitely given dried grape skins a 2nd run in newer grape kit ferments, I figure it cannot hurt even if most of the skins (and seeds) flavor, tannins, phenols, etc. was already captured in the first ferment. I have also done a 2nd run wine the only time I picked fresh grapes. So that time I only did add sugar water, but I had only done a 6 or 7 day ferment and then barely even squeezed the must there, so there was more un-squeezed wine mixed in with the sugar water and skins/seeds so to speak.

So basically if your sanitation is solid it cannot hurt but I would not bank on getting too much out of the skins after they go through one active ferment, much less two. So fine to use but add other fruit/flavor in the 2nd and 3rd go around. Or just do a really low abv quick drinker with these 'used tea bags'.

Again
 

Cosyden

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Thanks for that. I’ll give it a shot. Worse that can happen is it costs me a few pounds of sugar.
The recipe says 5 gallon (imperial) on the first batch, 3 gallon on the second and 3 gallon on the third with 750ml of red grape concentrate added. All 7 day ferments.
It’s worth doing just to know.
 

Cosyden

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I managed to get my hands on a few more demijohns over the last couple of days so made a start on this. The original recipe makes around 18 or 19 imperial gallons so I’ve pared it back a bit to suit the equipment I have.
The first batch is cooling in the bucket just now and I’ll pitch the yeast tonight.
The basic recipe is 1.56kg dried bilberries, 6.25kg sugar and 25 ltrs of boiling water.
Fingers crossed!
 

Cosyden

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Yikes! Out of curiosity I checked dried bilberries here (US) and they average $25 per 8 oz. Won't be on my Wine To Do list.
Crikey! I thought they were dear here. I found an organic supplies place in London. It works out about £12 per kg (US$6/lb ish) delivered. The recipe states that dried bilberries are equivalent to 4x fresh. So, I’ve used roughly equivalent to 6kg fresh bilberries. I can’t get fresh bilberries here unless I forage them myself. I haven’t picked wild bilberries for years but I remember it taking forever and most of them went straight in my mouth!
 

VinesnBines

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I tried a second run with the fruit from one of my country wines. I got almost no flavor from the re-used fruit.
Fresh grapes are about the only "fruit" I've found that can make a 2nd run, that includes dried fruit. Everything else gives up the flavor and substance on the first run.
 

BigDaveK

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Crikey! I thought they were dear here. I found an organic supplies place in London. It works out about £12 per kg (US$6/lb ish) delivered. The recipe states that dried bilberries are equivalent to 4x fresh. So, I’ve used roughly equivalent to 6kg fresh bilberries. I can’t get fresh bilberries here unless I forage them myself. I haven’t picked wild bilberries for years but I remember it taking forever and most of them went straight in my mouth!
Crikey is right!!! Also hard to find plants for sale. Not that popular in the states for some reason.
 

Cosyden

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Crikey is right!!! Also hard to find plants for sale. Not that popular in the states for some reason.
It’s probably due to growing conditions. They like heathland beyond the tree line. I would guess that the blueberry is a better bet for the home grower. Come to think of it, I don’t think I have seen bilberry plants for sale. They are pretty close to a blueberry. Smaller, more tart and stronger flavour. The dried bilberries I bought are actually imported from Turkey.
 

Cosyden

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My only worry about using dried fruit in general is that they tend to high levels of sulfite, higher than fresh or frozen.
That’s a very good point which I hadn’t considered. Luckily a bit of Googling tells me that sulfites aren’t added to organic dried fruit so it’s all good in that front. I was going to make a raisin wine next from the big bag of raisins in the baking cupboard but I think I’ll hold out until I can find some organic ones.
 

Ty520

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That’s a very good point which I hadn’t considered. Luckily a bit of Googling tells me that sulfites aren’t added to organic dried fruit so it’s all good in that front. I was going to make a raisin wine next from the big bag of raisins in the baking cupboard but I think I’ll hold out until I can find some organic ones.

I've only used dried fruits in a mead - They impart a jammy, stewed flavor. And regarding sulfites, it is often added as a preservative; organic produce will not add it - but as a result, they often will oxidize and go brown if they're lighter colored fruit (e.g., apricots). IMHO, they also taste a bit different
 

Ty520

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I did a craisin (dried cranberries) and raisin wine last year. I used a 4 lb bag of craisins and a 15oz box of raisins, intending to make one gallon. However, the sg was through the roof with all the sugar and so it ended up being a 2 gallon batch and is still above 13% abv.

FYI, sugars are often added to dried fruit - especially raisins and cranberries
 

Ty520

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Cranberries need quite a bit of sugar to be edible. I buy fresh cranberries every Nov. and freeze them. They don't have any added sugar.

true - i was just alluding to why Jovimaples' wine probably had such a high OG
 

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