Unplanned sour dough starter

Discussion in 'General Chit-Chat' started by GreenEnvy22, May 23, 2019.

Wine Making Forum

Help Support Winemaking Talk by donating:

  1. May 23, 2019 #1

    GreenEnvy22

    GreenEnvy22

    GreenEnvy22

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2015
    Messages:
    388
    Likes Received:
    456
    Location:
    Niagara Region, Canada
    I was testing my wines today and one tasted like it hadn't fermented fully, so I made up a starter with orange juice, water, fermaid, and then super b and 1118 yeast I had laying around.
    Before I added to the wine, I tested sg and it was .990 so no reason to add the yeast. Didn't want to just dump it down the drain.
    We've been baking a lot of bread recently, so decided so try making a sour dough starter.
    Once the yeast was bubbling away happily, I added it to some dark rye flour. Will keep feedung it for a week or two and see how it turns out.

    Anyone else try anything similar?
     
  2. May 23, 2019 #2

    ibglowin

    ibglowin

    ibglowin

    Moderator Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2009
    Messages:
    19,694
    Likes Received:
    8,847
    Location:
    Northern Nuevo Mexico
    Have thought about making ho-made sour dough but have not gotten around to it just yet. Not sure how it will turn out since you used a wine yeast instead of a bread yeast. Keep us posted as to if it develops the right flavor profile!
     
  3. May 24, 2019 #3

    Johnd

    Johnd

    Johnd

    Large Member WMT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2015
    Messages:
    4,971
    Likes Received:
    4,445
    Location:
    S Louisiana
    44CE26FE-8734-4667-99E5-3790200A7699.png
     
  4. May 24, 2019 #4

    sour_grapes

    sour_grapes

    sour_grapes

    Victim of the Invasion of the Avatar Snatchers

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2013
    Messages:
    9,318
    Likes Received:
    6,819
    @Johnd, we know, we know. It is a running joke here!
     
    ibglowin likes this.
  5. May 24, 2019 #5

    ibglowin

    ibglowin

    ibglowin

    Moderator Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2009
    Messages:
    19,694
    Likes Received:
    8,847
    Location:
    Northern Nuevo Mexico
  6. May 24, 2019 #6

    Johnd

    Johnd

    Johnd

    Large Member WMT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2015
    Messages:
    4,971
    Likes Received:
    4,445
    Location:
    S Louisiana
    Must’ve been running before my joining, it’s kinda irked the crap out out of me for 4+ years, but I’ve always just left it alone and wondered.................
     
  7. May 24, 2019 #7

    sour_grapes

    sour_grapes

    sour_grapes

    Victim of the Invasion of the Avatar Snatchers

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2013
    Messages:
    9,318
    Likes Received:
    6,819
    I was going to say it pre-dated you, but then I found it hard to believe how long that would have had to have been! Yes, yes, it never gets old... :)
     
    Johnd likes this.
  8. May 24, 2019 #8

    BernardSmith

    BernardSmith

    BernardSmith

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2011
    Messages:
    2,808
    Likes Received:
    1,019
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Saratoga Springs
    But back to the OP. Not an expert on sourdough breads but I bake bread every week. Not sure that people realize that sourdough is not simply a bread made with wild or non bread yeast. The souring comes from bacteria in the flour (because on the grain that was milled - ask home brewers about soured mash) producing lactic and other acids from the sugars available to them. So, in reality, if you simply make a "sponge" from flour, yeast and water and allow the sponge to stand for 24 hours you will have a fairly large colony of souring bacteria.
    A while back I was experimenting with wheat berries which I allowed to sprout (AKA "malting") to which I then added water (1 C berries kept moist 3 or 4 days, and when they sprouted I added 1 gallon of spring - ie non chlorinated water) which after 3 more days tended to have a pH of about 3.50 or lower. Never tried to use this liquor for baking bread but it did make very interesting tej (both bitter and sour). This sour liquor was, by some accounts quite popular within a niche of the population here in the US in the 1960's. it was called rejuvelac.
     
  9. May 26, 2019 #9

    GreenEnvy22

    GreenEnvy22

    GreenEnvy22

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2015
    Messages:
    388
    Likes Received:
    456
    Location:
    Niagara Region, Canada
    Made a loaf of sour dough bread yesterday, turned out pretty well! Good flavour and it rose nicely.

    Will try again next week when the starter is further along (this was just 3 days old, and discard from when I fed it). 20190525_162014.jpg 20190526_174846.jpg
     
    ibglowin likes this.

Share This Page