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Thin flat black grapes wine - how to correct?

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him24

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Hello,

I am a new member here. Ive been making grape wine for the last 4 years and slowly learning and getting better.

Last year in March I put 2 different batches of grapes in process. In one of the batches I purposely reduced sugar, but forgot to reduce water to the same ratio. The result is that the normal sugar/water batch has come out fine, a little dry feel with fruity flavor and a lovely deep red color. But the "problem" batch is light pink in color, tastes thin and flat. Both batches have a final SG of 0.97/0.98.

Well, :) this problem has happened for the first time, so don't know how to correct it. Any pointers, tips are welcome.

thanks,
him
 

JohnT

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Welcome to the forum!

So, If I understand you, your wine is thin and flat because you diluted with too much water??
 

him24

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That's right, John. I loosely follow Jack Keller's recipe. In this one, I forgot to reduce water after I reduced the sugar levels. Any ideas on how to improve it?
 

JohnT

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Unfortunately, I do not think that there is much you can do. Even if you decide to blend it with another wine, you will still end up with even more wine that tastes "thin".
 

him24

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Here are the ingredients I put in:

14kg black grapes
2kg sugar
5 ltr water
1 and a half packet (7.5gms) Lalvin RC 212 yeast
Papaya peel

Starting SG without sugar was 1.06. Two and a half months later, SG was 0.098.
 

grapeman

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Either you have two different batches being the nice colored flavorful one and the second thin, pink one (just leave them as is) or you could blend the two and have one larger batch which will be somewhere between the two. Personally I would do some bench trials and try to blend a small amount of the two and see how it is. That will make it easier to make a decision you can live with. If the taste is good, you will have one big batch. If you just can't make it better, at least you have one batch of really good stuff.
 

him24

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Thanks for the advice @grapeman. I tried blending a little sample of both wines but the result wasn't too exciting. Since we've already finished off 4 bottles of the nicer batch, I am going to leave that and the thin batch separate, and use it for Sangira/Mulled wine and elsewhere I can :)

thanks again!
 

Arne

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You can always use it to top up future batches when racking. Or you can try making a much stronger fruit wise batch and blend it in there. Do bench trials first before trying to mix everything together. You should be able to get a blend you like that way. Arne.
 

him24

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Thanks Arne. I guess that's what will happen eventually even after using it for Sangria and Mulled wine etc. I'm definitely not going to let it go waste, will try and make a stronger batch to blend it with, as you suggested.
 

winemanden

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You can't blend up. Quality always goes down. It should always be the best you can make it, if your first lot is really good why spoil it? Try doing as Arne says, blend it in a bit at a time with a stronger tasting full bodied brew. Having said that, Sangria or Mulled sounds good.
 

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