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Kraffty

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First go at Ciabatta from a recipe that calls for starting a Sponge 24 hours before mixing the dough. I took it a step further and used a sourdough starter to create the Sponge and followed the recipe exactly from there. Chewy crunchy crust and soft and really flavorful interior. First time using Blue Bird flour and I think it works just fine. This loaf will become garlic toast to go with steak dinner tonight.
Ciabatta.jpg
 

Chuck E

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My attempt at a sour dough starter failed. It was going good for a couple days, then it separated and smelled bad. Not sure what the problem is, but I will attempt again.
 

ceeaton

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Today's project was aimed at the KettlePizza. Beautiful day in Central PA. Made up a couple of doughs and got the grill going. Only issue was that I couldn't get my new "normal" base charcoal (B&B) and had to use some Kingsford. After two pizzas the Kingsford gave up the goat and my temps dropped. Threw a bunch of pecan and apple wood on and the only finished pizza image was what resulted. You can get the KettlePizza too hot (stone was running around 800*F using my infrared temp probe, no idea what the ambient temp was, all gauges were pegged on high). The pizza that resulted after 2 minutes was actually quite edible. I do make an extra dough (was planning on making 5 so I made 6) for times like these. All a learning process, just didn't realize there was all that much to learn about making pizza on a grill.

9-5-20_pizza-1.jpg

9-5-20_pizza-2.jpg
 

sour_grapes

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I haven't been reporting. I got in a rut -- I just keep making that super-easy focaccia over and over. I have been making it about every 3 days. Sometimes I cook it on the grill, sometimes in the oven. It turns out delicious every time (some more than others, I will admit). I am trying to decide what will make me try something different or even go back to my normal boule bread? I don't see the reason!
 

Boatboy24

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I'm overdue - haven't made anything in about a month. Time to feed the starter...
 

Chuck E

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@ceeaton I made pizza last night for the in-laws. My stone was about 600F for the first pie and went down to 500F for the second, which took longer to cook. I had TOO MUCH trouble getting the pies to slide into the grill. Some people have mentioned using semolina under the pies. I've tried corn meal.
Looking for tips to get the pies on and off the peel.
 

Boatboy24

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@Chuck E : I've found the semolina works much better than the corn meal, and doesn't burn nearly as easily. Also, in my experience, a metal peel is much easier to use than a wooden one. Once I get the dough stretched, I place it on the metal peel for assembly, but give it a quick back and forth shake to be sure it slides easily. I do the same after I assemble, but prior to putting in the oven/grill. If it isn't moving easily, I'll gently lift whatever corner(s) of the pie aren't moving and throw a little more semolina under there.
 

ceeaton

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@ChuckE, I use semolina as well. Use a wooden peel for assembly, a metal one once I get it on the stone (it's much thinner, easier to pick up the cooking pie). I only have enough semolina for a couple of more cooks, hoping my brother can sell me some more. Can't find it in the grocery stores or specialty shops, everyone must be making pasta through this covid stuff. I can get some at a restaurant supply store, but it is a 50 lb sack, enough for the rest of my life even if I'd live to 100, which I won't (history of early male passing in our family).
 

Kraffty

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@ChuckE I'm pretty much a beginner at the whole pizza thing too but the faster you top that pizza and get if off the peel the better, like really quick if possible. Cheating by putting parchment paper under the dough works also and is pretty fool proof. At least until we can get a little more experience under our belts like the guys above.
 

Boatboy24

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Two days, two loaves. Got the Levain out of the fridge on Sunday and fed it. Fed again yesterday and made this loaf with the discard - loosely the same recipe as the Pan de Campagne from Flour, Water, Salt, Yeast; with just a bit of improv/not reading directions. I over proofed and didn't get quite the oven spring I'd hoped for, but it was still better than good.

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Today's loaf was Pan de Campagne by the book. Overnight proof, very good (but not great this time) oven spring.

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This stuff is positively delicious, but I need to up my game to keep up with some of you guys and start making some focaccia or ciabatta.
 
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sour_grapes

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Oh, I don't think you are missing anything! That looks great.

I am really in a focaccia rut. I just banged one out to cook tomorrow. Just too easy!
 

Kraffty

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We have company coming next Sunday for a 5 day visit. I know bread freezes well and was thinking of baking a few types ahead of time and then using the food-saver to vacuum pac before freezing. Any thoughts on how well that would work at producing "fresh bread" without having to spend time fussing while company's here?
 

sour_grapes

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Offhand, I think the food saver is more likely to harm than help. I routinely store bread in the freezer (without vacuum packing it).
 

Kraffty

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What is your gut feeling on why it would harm rather than help? It seems to me that the less oxygen the better.
 

bstnh1

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I'm really not that keen on freezing bread. I do it quite often, but I find it tends to dry it out and get it to the "stale" stage a lot faster. Having said that, I have read that the best way to freeze bread is to remove as much air as possible form the bag and double bag it. Sounds like your idea of vacuum packing it might just do the trick!
 

Boatboy24

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