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Teamsterjohn

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Here goes, Is ph and acid the same thing? Im looking to pick up an acid or ph kit, and an SO2 kit. Are there any one type that you like?
 

arcticsid

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John, I just got a new Northern Brewer beer catalog the other day, they offer a couple kinds of electronic PH testers. I wanted to ask if anyone is familiar with these. The cheaper one is like 27 skins. I don't have a link to that page in the catalog, but there website is, www.nortnernbrewer.com the product is "pH600 Economy pH Meter" product # 40421 on page 40.

Take a look at this. I hope someone can chime in what tey tink of these electronic ones. I am curious to join your thread, I too am interested in the answer.

Troy
 

Green Mountains

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I used to have a test kit but only used it once and forget for the most part how it works.

HOWEVER, I believe that Ph and Acid are opposites and what you're looking for is a balance between the two. Higher the Ph, the lower the acid level and vice versa.

Now I'm part of the thread and am looking for a better (or even correct) answer.

Hi Troy, Hi John :dg
 

Teamsterjohn

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The more I read it here, the more I want to know. That electric tester I thing I seen it. Is that the one that you need to keep the tip damp at all times? And GM, I read in here thats it's best to test for SO2, instead of just added that 1/4 teaspoon every 3 month's. If im going to get into this hobby ( lifestyle) I might as well be doing it the right way, and learn a thing or two at it.
 

arcticsid

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I have NEVER used one, but now that I realize the importance myself, I hope we can all come up with an answer together.
 

deboard

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pH is just a measure of how acidic or basic something is, with lower numbers indicating acidic, and higher numbers basic. Pure water is neither acidic or basic, and has a pH of 7. Higher than 7 is considered basic, and lower is considered acidic. (the lower the number, the more acidic a liquid is)

So it's a bit analogous to the SG scale, where we measure it against the SG of water of 1.000. Alcohol has a lower SG than water, and sugar solution has a higher SG than water.
 

Teamsterjohn

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OK, so what number's would we be looking at for a red wine, in eather ph or acidic?
 

NSwiner

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Troy you make all your wines from scratch right ? Since I'm thinking of giving that a try with 100% juices do I really need to worry about that on my first try or just go by taste for now ? The only PH tester I have in my house is for the fish tank lol .
 

rawlus

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IMHO, if you are making kit wines, there is no practical reason to test Ph or TA other than for curiosity's sake. manuf balance these kits during manufacture and buffer them so that making any changes (or errors) is made more difficult.

Sterile juices are also usually pre-balanced and ameliorated.

fresh juices or grapes, then it makes sense to begin to get into Ph and TA adjustment among other things.

for kit winemakers, i think monitoring SO2 is a good habit to get into, even if only at a rudimentary level with a quick-test kit or titrets. setting up a proper A/O setup for testing SO2 for kits seems to me a bit overkill. but if you are into juices and grapes, it makes more sense to have the lab setup as you can then have an area dedicated to testing - SO2 by A/O, a good Ph meter, titration stand and burettes and pipettes and whatnot to also test for TA via Ph and so on. this introduces alot more complexity to the process (in addition to record-keeping and expense) than i think the whole "kit" process intended. again, makes more sense to me for those advancing to fresh grapes and/or advanced winemaking.

and even with grapes or fresh juices - if you are purchasing from a local source/distributor - many offer testing services very affordably (many also offer crushing/destemming/pressing as well) which can carry you until you decide to make the larger investment into a testing lab setup.
 

BobF

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Here goes, Is ph and acid the same thing? Im looking to pick up an acid or ph kit, and an SO2 kit. Are there any one type that you like?
pH and TA don't always track exactly together. Think of TA as the quantity of acid and pH as the strength of the acid.

There are different ranges of each given by different sources. In general, 3.2 - 3.6 should be good for pH. The pH level isn't as important for taste as it is for anti-microbial/oxidation as pH directly impacts the effectiveness of so2.

TA ranges are more subjective and relate more directly to taste. Or, more accurately, the overall balance with other characteristics of the wine; tannin, sweetness, body ... obviously you'll impact pH if you get too far off with TA.

so2 testing isn't something I do. I'm not yet willing to pay $2 a shot to check free so2 levels.

Acid I've been testing/adjusting for a while. Results indicate this is worthwhile to do. pH I've only done with strips, so I basically haven't really done pH testing. I intend to purchase an electronic pH meter Some Day.
 

arcticsid

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Darlene, I have never tested for acid. I know you should, but am willing to bet, most don't. For the most part I am following the quidelines of a tried and true recipes so I haven't really been that concerned. I really haven't "made up" any recipes. This whole pH thing, although important, by no means is imparative.,....I quess!

Troy
 

BobF

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Darlene, I have never tested for acid. I know you should, but am willing to bet, most don't. For the most part I am following the quidelines of a tried and true recipes so I haven't really been that concerned. I really haven't "made up" any recipes. This whole pH thing, although important, by no means is imparative.,....I quess!

Troy
To me, the whole testing thing comes down to risk. T&T recipes are great, BUT there are variables involved.

I figure if I'm making a gallon and the pH is too high resulting in spoilage - well, it's only a gallon!

OTOH, the larger the batch the more important it is to me. When I pick 30# of something to make a larger batch with, the risk is greater. This is the reason I intend to get myself a pH tester sooner rather than later.

Right now there are a lot of things I need to acquire to be more consistent. Every expenditure, though, comes down to a choice between higher production capacity, ease and improved results.

Some day I'll have all three covered - but it will be a while!
 

arcticsid

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I'm waiting in the same line with you bro' ! "all in due time", thats what I keep saying. LOL
 

Wade E

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I think Bob put that in words that every one can understand. All tyreee of those tests make a wine worthy or not worthy of aging. I use the Accuvin testkits but like Bob would like to get a PH tester eventually.
 
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